Gardening Gold

Seed sales are up nationwide. At the White House, Michelle Obama has broken ground on a vegetable plot. The first lady knows nothing is more sustainable — or more delicious — than growing your own food. And your food can’t get more local than when it comes from your own yard. One cloud in this sunny scenario: Many vegetables like rich soil, but putting chemical fertilizer on your garden isn’t healthy for the environment or your family. Grommet friend George Jonah told us about a better way to nourish plants — vermicomposting. Vermicomposting is the process of recycling organic waste, like food scraps, cardboard, and even junk mail, using extremely hungry worms called “Red Wigglers.” Microbes break down the waste. The worms eat the microbes and create worm castings. You can put the castings into your vegetable patch to produce lovely green leafies that would make an organic farmer beam with pride. One month after setting up his vermicomposting bin, George has a thriving community of worms that gobble up two pounds of kitchen waste each week. His garden is benefiting from the richest organic fertilizer possible and he has a steady supply of fishing worms. The best part? His grand kids love their thousands of new “pets.” Maybe the Obama’s need more than an adorable puppy. A bin of “First Worms” would really help Michelle’s vegetables – and her beautiful daughters — thrive.

Worm Composting System

Cascade Manufacturing

Gardening Gold

Seed sales are up nationwide. At the White House, Michelle Obama has broken ground on a vegetable plot. The first lady knows nothing is more sustainable — or more delicious — than growing your own food. And your food can’t get more local than when it comes from your own yard. One cloud in this sunny scenario: Many vegetables like rich soil, but putting chemical fertilizer on your garden isn’t healthy for the environment or your family. Grommet friend George Jonah told us about a better way to nourish plants — vermicomposting. Vermicomposting is the process of recycling organic waste, like food scraps, cardboard, and even junk mail, using extremely hungry worms called “Red Wigglers.” Microbes break down the waste. The worms eat the microbes and create worm castings. You can put the castings into your vegetable patch to produce lovely green leafies that would make an organic farmer beam with pride. One month after setting up his vermicomposting bin, George has a thriving community of worms that gobble up two pounds of kitchen waste each week. His garden is benefiting from the richest organic fertilizer possible and he has a steady supply of fishing worms. The best part? His grand kids love their thousands of new “pets.” Maybe the Obama’s need more than an adorable puppy. A bin of “First Worms” would really help Michelle’s vegetables – and her beautiful daughters — thrive.

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Christina
    Christina

    Hi everyone! Worm composting is an incredibly efficient

    way to convert kitchen scraps, junk mail and cardboard into nutrient-rich compost for your garden. The Worm Factory’s® unique

    design makes it the most efficient worm composter around! Cascade Manufacturing Sales believes that composting is the most

    efficient way to recycle and minimize waste. The company's goal is to

    inform and integrate this form of recycling and waste minimization into

    households both nationally and internationally. I

    look forward to reading your comments and am happy to answer

    questions.

  • Lisa
    Lisa
    6/17/2009 12:28 PM

    I used to throw my kitchen scraps in a big black plastic drum that--theoretically-made them into compost. I guess I never had enough sun to heat it up and the scraps took FOREVER to biodegrade. This sounds much more efficient. And it doesn't take up much space. What about temperature, sun, etc. Where should we put the worm bin?

  • Brenda
    Brenda
    6/17/2009 12:30 PM

    Is there any odor associated with this. Usually whenever i tried to compost anything, it takes on a very awful aroma.

  • Nancy
    Nancy
    6/17/2009 12:30 PM

    I just heard about worm composting on NPR the other day and wanted to look into it a bit more. Thanks so much for delivering it to my inbox!

  • Christina
    Christina – Special Guest
    6/17/2009 12:49 PM

    The Worm Factory® operates best between 40-80 degrees. If you are one of the many that live in hot climates, we recommend putting your unit under an eve or porch or in a potting shed. The goal is to protect your worms from the hottest part of the day. The great thing about The Worm Factory® is that our design allows the proper ventilation throughout the unit, eliminating the odor associated with most composting projects.

  • Stan
    Stan
    6/17/2009 1:06 PM

    sounds great. two questions:

    1. What happens to the worms if you don't have scraps/enough scraps for a few weeks (e.g. go on vacation?)

    2. What happens if you have more output than you need? (e.g. lots of scraps, but not as much need for the volume of fertilizer?)

  • Christina
    Christina – Special Guest
    6/17/2009 1:25 PM

    Great questions. 1) Worms do not need to be fed everyday. They can keep working on the food you have put in there for weeks. So, don't worry about them starving to death.2) If you have more compost than you can use, share with a neighbor or sell it to a local nursery or farm.

  • Marynell
    Marynell
    6/17/2009 2:07 PM

    Wow - so I first thought I'd be laughing when I checked out this Grommet, but I am convinced that this is one very cool -- and seriously beneficial -- idea. Who knew?

  • Mary S.
    Mary S.
    6/17/2009 3:46 PM

    I've got what's probably a crazy question ... but what happens to these worms eventually? How long do you leave them in there ... do you rotate them? Will they try to escape? Grow to be HUGE?? (can you tell I'm intrigued but a little scared at the thought of all those worms so close to my house?)

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    6/17/2009 4:04 PM

    @MN and @Mary S. I am laughing out loud at your two comments. I love them. I'll let Christina address the "attack of the killer worms" question. Now I want to know too!

  • Christina
    Christina – Special Guest
    6/17/2009 4:15 PM

    Let me put your minds at ease. Many people, when they think of worms, have a negative connotation in their minds right off the bat. That is what we are working to change. The worms that you put into the Worm Factory® regulate their own population. About every three months, their population will double in size. But, if they start to run out of room, they will stop reproducing. When worms reach the end of their life, they will be replaced by more babies. You don't have to worry about a big roiling mess of worms waiting to eat your cat or anything else they can get their mouths on. This won't happen. They can live in your unit for their whole lives, and be completely happy. Most people don't know, but worms operate mostly on instinct. As long as they have food, they are happy campers.

  • Mary S.
    Mary S.
    6/17/2009 8:22 PM

    LOL!! I love your reply Christina. You knew just where I was coming from and I am absolutely amazed and fascinated by your knowledge of worms, their reproductive habits, etc., etc. I appreciate the fact you didn't just laugh at my craziness but actually answered me in such detail. And I think you might just accomplish your goal and change people's minds about this. I'm with you, MN ... who knew???

  • Kevin
    Kevin
    6/17/2009 10:05 PM

    Years ago when I first heard of keeping worms and garbage in your house, I thought it was pretty ridiculous.

    Then I tried it. I've since tried a few different worm containers. We bought a Worm Factory about a year ago. They are expensive, but GREAT! I've got a zillion very happy and well fed worms in our basement, and have made plenty of great compost.

  • Katherine
    Katherine
    6/17/2009 11:05 PM

    This is fabulous! To get the best compost, do you have to have a certain blend of input? Does junk mail give you as good of compost as food scraps?

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    6/18/2009 8:16 AM

    @Kevin....putting it in the basement. I would never have thought of that. Great idea!

  • Liz
    Liz
    6/18/2009 8:34 AM

    I am sending this link to my friends who are gardeners. (Maybe one day I will be too as the cost of organic produce keeps climbing.) This worm thing is pretty funky.

  • Tim
    Tim
    6/18/2009 10:15 AM

    A previous comment says, "The Worm Factory® operates best between 40-80 degrees. " What happens when the temp is over 90 degrees for many days in summer.....even in the shade...and consistantly between 0 and 15 degrees for most of the winter? Whatever is in there in the winter will be frozen solid.

  • Christina
    Christina – Special Guest
    6/18/2009 11:23 AM

    You can feed your worms what you have at home. The goal is to recycle what you would normally throw away. The worms don't have to have a special diet. THEY WILL EAT ALMOST ANYTHING.

  • Christina
    Christina – Special Guest
    6/18/2009 11:26 AM

    Many people who are concerned about how hot it gets during the summer, either pull their unit into their garage. If you have to have it outside, prop the lid up a little bit to get some extra airflow. This unit is not made to be outside all winter long. We did design it to be used indoors. It is odor free, self contained, and clean. These worms are living things, we take them out of the ground to help us recycle our waste. The best thing we can do in return for them, is to protect them from the extreme weather.

  • Melissa J White
    Melissa J White
    8/24/2009 6:29 AM

    A couple things my husband taught me about red wigglers.

    1. Worms "dive" when it is too hot or too cold. They need 12-inches of worm bed or insulation.

    2. Worms don't "eat food", they actually eat the microbes that are breaking down all your waste.

    3. You don't need to turn your compost when you have worms--they do the turning for you! And,

    4. Worms are hermaphroditic; they include both male and female reproductive organs, but need another worm to make seeds. If your worms stop reproducing, just feed them some more and they will be born again.

    Worms are amazing! We sell worm "starter" for your compost: www.milagrocompost.com. Thanks for "spreading" the news about worms!

  • Karen
    Karen
    11/5/2009 12:58 PM

    Your link to purchase doesn't work anymore

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/5/2009 4:18 PM

    Karen - thank you for letting us know! It has been fixed.

  • Kristine
    Kristine
    7/29/2010 6:39 PM

    If a person wants to get the soil for their garden, how do you get the dirt out without taking the worms out too?

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    7/29/2010 10:30 PM

    @Kristine - there are multiple trays and when the worms have composted one tray, they move up to the next tray.

  • Amanda P.
    Amanda P.
    8/9/2010 1:34 PM

    I live in AZ and it is really warm year round, but if this really is odor free could we keep it in the laundry room? I do not have a garage. Are there instruction of what to put in and what not to put in? I have been researching online and there is very conflicting information out there. Can you put just about anything that is biodegradable in it?

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    8/9/2010 1:45 PM

    Amanda P. this is what Cascade Manufacturing says about your questions:

    We recommend feeding your worms a diet of 50% food scraps and 50% fiber and paper scraps. This will give your finished compost balanced nutrient levels. But worms will eat virtually anything, so don't worry too much about what you feed them. If you have more food scraps than fiber, they will be fine. You do not have to follow an exact recipe. Give them what you have on hand but, do not give them meat or dairy, these items may kill you worms. The goal is to recycle what you would usually throw away. You don't have to buy food for your worms.

    If maintained properly, your worm bin will not smell. The keys to maintaining an odorless composter is moisture control and ventilation. Anaerobic bacteria is the main cause of odor. If you don't allow proper ventilation these bacteria will grow inside your unit, bringing odor with them.

  • Melinda
    Melinda
    12/7/2010 9:46 PM

    I am planning on getting this for my father as a Christmas gift. How is it shipped? What are the worms shipped in? We will have it shipped to Georgia and then transport it to Ohio.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    12/8/2010 12:29 AM

    @Melinda Lahmers: That sounds like a wonderful gift. The bin will ship UPS Ground. It does not come with the worms. You will need to purchase them locally.

  • Pamela
    Pamela
    12/8/2010 2:21 PM

    ....really like this idea....but where does one go to get worms exactly? A co op? Is there some kind of worm vendor we can use?

    Thanks!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    12/10/2010 9:53 AM

    @Pamela: You can check locally at a garden center or do an online search.

  • Monika
    Monika
    1/18/2011 10:06 AM

    I'm very interested,but my concern I dont have any room in my House,but I do have a small Shed outside.We live in Washington State and the Weather here is very wet,will that still work?And you say the worms will eat also junkmail and Cardboard,how does that work,dont they choke on that?Thanks for any help!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    1/18/2011 11:17 AM

    @Monika: According to the manufacturers, worms need to be between 40 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit to survive and are most comfortable at about room temperature. Moisture is an important factor in a worm bin. Since worms breath through their skin the bin cannot be too wet or the worms may drown. Careful attention must be paid to ensure the bedding and compost doesn't get too moist.

    No the worms don't choke on the fiber, worms have no teeth so they eat food by coating it with their saliva making it soft and easy to digest.

  • Steve Smith
    Steve Smith
    2/18/2011 2:17 PM

    Please understand that these worms cannot live in garden soil. They aren't your garden variety earthworms. If you keep the composter outside, you may get infested with earwigs. I made that mistake. The composted castings (worm poop) smell wonderful.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    2/18/2011 2:47 PM

    @Steve Smith: Thanks for stopping by and sharing your insight. That's intriguing that worm poop would smell good when they are feeding on trash. It must agree with their system!

  • Joycedee
    Joycedee
    3/14/2011 1:26 PM

    Maybe the Obamas need one for their garden...Mrs. Obama is a gardener! I am going to consider getting one this year. My daughter is starting a farm from scratch (organic) and this would be a great gift.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    3/14/2011 1:57 PM

    @Joycedee: A great gift for your daughter, and the Obamas too!

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

Worm Composting System

Cascade Manufacturing

Gardening Gold

Seed sales are up nationwide. At the White House, Michelle Obama has broken ground on a vegetable plot. The first lady knows nothing is more sustainable — or more delicious — than growing your own food. And your food can’t get more local than when it comes from your own yard.

One cloud in this sunny scenario: Many vegetables like rich soil, but putting chemical fertilizer on your garden isn’t healthy for the environment or your family.

Grommet friend George Jonah told us about a better way to nourish plants —
vermicomposting. Vermicomposting is the process of recycling organic waste, like food scraps, cardboard, and even junk mail, using extremely hungry worms called “Red Wigglers.” Microbes break down the waste. The worms eat the microbes and create worm castings. You can put the castings into your vegetable patch to produce lovely green leafies that would make an organic farmer beam with pride.

One month after setting up his vermicomposting bin, George has a thriving community of worms that gobble up two pounds of kitchen waste each week. His garden is benefiting from the richest organic fertilizer possible and he has a steady supply of fishing worms. The best part? His grand kids love their thousands of new “pets.”

Maybe the Obama’s need more than an adorable puppy. A bin of “First Worms” would really help Michelle’s vegetables – and her beautiful daughters — thrive.
Read More Read Less
No longer available

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Christina
    Christina

    Hi everyone! Worm composting is an incredibly efficient

    way to convert kitchen scraps, junk mail and cardboard into nutrient-rich compost for your garden. The Worm Factory’s® unique

    design makes it the most efficient worm composter around! Cascade Manufacturing Sales believes that composting is the most

    efficient way to recycle and minimize waste. The company's goal is to

    inform and integrate this form of recycling and waste minimization into

    households both nationally and internationally. I

    look forward to reading your comments and am happy to answer

    questions.

  • Lisa
    Lisa
    6/17/2009 12:28 PM

    I used to throw my kitchen scraps in a big black plastic drum that--theoretically-made them into compost. I guess I never had enough sun to heat it up and the scraps took FOREVER to biodegrade. This sounds much more efficient. And it doesn't take up much space. What about temperature, sun, etc. Where should we put the worm bin?

  • Brenda
    Brenda
    6/17/2009 12:30 PM

    Is there any odor associated with this. Usually whenever i tried to compost anything, it takes on a very awful aroma.

  • Nancy
    Nancy
    6/17/2009 12:30 PM

    I just heard about worm composting on NPR the other day and wanted to look into it a bit more. Thanks so much for delivering it to my inbox!

  • Christina
    Christina – Special Guest
    6/17/2009 12:49 PM

    The Worm Factory® operates best between 40-80 degrees. If you are one of the many that live in hot climates, we recommend putting your unit under an eve or porch or in a potting shed. The goal is to protect your worms from the hottest part of the day. The great thing about The Worm Factory® is that our design allows the proper ventilation throughout the unit, eliminating the odor associated with most composting projects.

  • Stan
    Stan
    6/17/2009 1:06 PM

    sounds great. two questions:

    1. What happens to the worms if you don't have scraps/enough scraps for a few weeks (e.g. go on vacation?)

    2. What happens if you have more output than you need? (e.g. lots of scraps, but not as much need for the volume of fertilizer?)

  • Christina
    Christina – Special Guest
    6/17/2009 1:25 PM

    Great questions. 1) Worms do not need to be fed everyday. They can keep working on the food you have put in there for weeks. So, don't worry about them starving to death.2) If you have more compost than you can use, share with a neighbor or sell it to a local nursery or farm.

  • Marynell
    Marynell
    6/17/2009 2:07 PM

    Wow - so I first thought I'd be laughing when I checked out this Grommet, but I am convinced that this is one very cool -- and seriously beneficial -- idea. Who knew?

  • Mary S.
    Mary S.
    6/17/2009 3:46 PM

    I've got what's probably a crazy question ... but what happens to these worms eventually? How long do you leave them in there ... do you rotate them? Will they try to escape? Grow to be HUGE?? (can you tell I'm intrigued but a little scared at the thought of all those worms so close to my house?)

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    6/17/2009 4:04 PM

    @MN and @Mary S. I am laughing out loud at your two comments. I love them. I'll let Christina address the "attack of the killer worms" question. Now I want to know too!

  • Christina
    Christina – Special Guest
    6/17/2009 4:15 PM

    Let me put your minds at ease. Many people, when they think of worms, have a negative connotation in their minds right off the bat. That is what we are working to change. The worms that you put into the Worm Factory® regulate their own population. About every three months, their population will double in size. But, if they start to run out of room, they will stop reproducing. When worms reach the end of their life, they will be replaced by more babies. You don't have to worry about a big roiling mess of worms waiting to eat your cat or anything else they can get their mouths on. This won't happen. They can live in your unit for their whole lives, and be completely happy. Most people don't know, but worms operate mostly on instinct. As long as they have food, they are happy campers.

  • Mary S.
    Mary S.
    6/17/2009 8:22 PM

    LOL!! I love your reply Christina. You knew just where I was coming from and I am absolutely amazed and fascinated by your knowledge of worms, their reproductive habits, etc., etc. I appreciate the fact you didn't just laugh at my craziness but actually answered me in such detail. And I think you might just accomplish your goal and change people's minds about this. I'm with you, MN ... who knew???

  • Kevin
    Kevin
    6/17/2009 10:05 PM

    Years ago when I first heard of keeping worms and garbage in your house, I thought it was pretty ridiculous.

    Then I tried it. I've since tried a few different worm containers. We bought a Worm Factory about a year ago. They are expensive, but GREAT! I've got a zillion very happy and well fed worms in our basement, and have made plenty of great compost.

  • Katherine
    Katherine
    6/17/2009 11:05 PM

    This is fabulous! To get the best compost, do you have to have a certain blend of input? Does junk mail give you as good of compost as food scraps?

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    6/18/2009 8:16 AM

    @Kevin....putting it in the basement. I would never have thought of that. Great idea!

  • Liz
    Liz
    6/18/2009 8:34 AM

    I am sending this link to my friends who are gardeners. (Maybe one day I will be too as the cost of organic produce keeps climbing.) This worm thing is pretty funky.

  • Tim
    Tim
    6/18/2009 10:15 AM

    A previous comment says, "The Worm Factory® operates best between 40-80 degrees. " What happens when the temp is over 90 degrees for many days in summer.....even in the shade...and consistantly between 0 and 15 degrees for most of the winter? Whatever is in there in the winter will be frozen solid.

  • Christina
    Christina – Special Guest
    6/18/2009 11:23 AM

    You can feed your worms what you have at home. The goal is to recycle what you would normally throw away. The worms don't have to have a special diet. THEY WILL EAT ALMOST ANYTHING.

  • Christina
    Christina – Special Guest
    6/18/2009 11:26 AM

    Many people who are concerned about how hot it gets during the summer, either pull their unit into their garage. If you have to have it outside, prop the lid up a little bit to get some extra airflow. This unit is not made to be outside all winter long. We did design it to be used indoors. It is odor free, self contained, and clean. These worms are living things, we take them out of the ground to help us recycle our waste. The best thing we can do in return for them, is to protect them from the extreme weather.

  • Melissa J White
    Melissa J White
    8/24/2009 6:29 AM

    A couple things my husband taught me about red wigglers.

    1. Worms "dive" when it is too hot or too cold. They need 12-inches of worm bed or insulation.

    2. Worms don't "eat food", they actually eat the microbes that are breaking down all your waste.

    3. You don't need to turn your compost when you have worms--they do the turning for you! And,

    4. Worms are hermaphroditic; they include both male and female reproductive organs, but need another worm to make seeds. If your worms stop reproducing, just feed them some more and they will be born again.

    Worms are amazing! We sell worm "starter" for your compost: www.milagrocompost.com. Thanks for "spreading" the news about worms!

  • Karen
    Karen
    11/5/2009 12:58 PM

    Your link to purchase doesn't work anymore

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/5/2009 4:18 PM

    Karen - thank you for letting us know! It has been fixed.

  • Kristine
    Kristine
    7/29/2010 6:39 PM

    If a person wants to get the soil for their garden, how do you get the dirt out without taking the worms out too?

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    7/29/2010 10:30 PM

    @Kristine - there are multiple trays and when the worms have composted one tray, they move up to the next tray.

  • Amanda P.
    Amanda P.
    8/9/2010 1:34 PM

    I live in AZ and it is really warm year round, but if this really is odor free could we keep it in the laundry room? I do not have a garage. Are there instruction of what to put in and what not to put in? I have been researching online and there is very conflicting information out there. Can you put just about anything that is biodegradable in it?

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    8/9/2010 1:45 PM

    Amanda P. this is what Cascade Manufacturing says about your questions:

    We recommend feeding your worms a diet of 50% food scraps and 50% fiber and paper scraps. This will give your finished compost balanced nutrient levels. But worms will eat virtually anything, so don't worry too much about what you feed them. If you have more food scraps than fiber, they will be fine. You do not have to follow an exact recipe. Give them what you have on hand but, do not give them meat or dairy, these items may kill you worms. The goal is to recycle what you would usually throw away. You don't have to buy food for your worms.

    If maintained properly, your worm bin will not smell. The keys to maintaining an odorless composter is moisture control and ventilation. Anaerobic bacteria is the main cause of odor. If you don't allow proper ventilation these bacteria will grow inside your unit, bringing odor with them.

  • Melinda
    Melinda
    12/7/2010 9:46 PM

    I am planning on getting this for my father as a Christmas gift. How is it shipped? What are the worms shipped in? We will have it shipped to Georgia and then transport it to Ohio.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    12/8/2010 12:29 AM

    @Melinda Lahmers: That sounds like a wonderful gift. The bin will ship UPS Ground. It does not come with the worms. You will need to purchase them locally.

  • Pamela
    Pamela
    12/8/2010 2:21 PM

    ....really like this idea....but where does one go to get worms exactly? A co op? Is there some kind of worm vendor we can use?

    Thanks!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    12/10/2010 9:53 AM

    @Pamela: You can check locally at a garden center or do an online search.

  • Monika
    Monika
    1/18/2011 10:06 AM

    I'm very interested,but my concern I dont have any room in my House,but I do have a small Shed outside.We live in Washington State and the Weather here is very wet,will that still work?And you say the worms will eat also junkmail and Cardboard,how does that work,dont they choke on that?Thanks for any help!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    1/18/2011 11:17 AM

    @Monika: According to the manufacturers, worms need to be between 40 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit to survive and are most comfortable at about room temperature. Moisture is an important factor in a worm bin. Since worms breath through their skin the bin cannot be too wet or the worms may drown. Careful attention must be paid to ensure the bedding and compost doesn't get too moist.

    No the worms don't choke on the fiber, worms have no teeth so they eat food by coating it with their saliva making it soft and easy to digest.

  • Steve Smith
    Steve Smith
    2/18/2011 2:17 PM

    Please understand that these worms cannot live in garden soil. They aren't your garden variety earthworms. If you keep the composter outside, you may get infested with earwigs. I made that mistake. The composted castings (worm poop) smell wonderful.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    2/18/2011 2:47 PM

    @Steve Smith: Thanks for stopping by and sharing your insight. That's intriguing that worm poop would smell good when they are feeding on trash. It must agree with their system!

  • Joycedee
    Joycedee
    3/14/2011 1:26 PM

    Maybe the Obamas need one for their garden...Mrs. Obama is a gardener! I am going to consider getting one this year. My daughter is starting a farm from scratch (organic) and this would be a great gift.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    3/14/2011 1:57 PM

    @Joycedee: A great gift for your daughter, and the Obamas too!

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.