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Clean Plate

Ever feel like it’s impossible to really change the way you eat? Clean Food can help you get over that hurdle. More than just a cookbook, Clean Food is a guide to making healthy choices. Terry Walters teaches readers about the benefits of choosing living plants, not processed food, and eating close to the source — meaning food travels fewer steps to get from where it was grown to your table. She’s passionate about making a commitment to naturally grown foods, not only for ourselves but also for the environment. With Clean Food, Terry provides a road map to preparing delicious, nourishing meals.The cookbook is organized by season, which makes it easy to choose recipes that feature fruits and vegetables in their prime and readily available — mango salsa for summertime, for instance, or roasted squash with fennel and asparagus for fall. Clean Food also shares year-round recipes, like Terry’s decadent peanut butter chocolate chip cookies. (Most of the recipes are vegan, but you can add a little protein if you want.) It’s not easy to break the habit of eating processed foods — let’s face it, they’re convenient. Fresh foods can seem harder to find and more daunting to prepare, but Terry makes it easy to enjoy the rewards of better eating.

Clean Food

by Terry Walters

Clean Plate

Ever feel like it’s impossible to really change the way you eat? Clean Food can help you get over that hurdle. More than just a cookbook, Clean Food is a guide to making healthy choices. Terry Walters teaches readers about the benefits of choosing living plants, not processed food, and eating close to the source — meaning food travels fewer steps to get from where it was grown to your table. She’s passionate about making a commitment to naturally grown foods, not only for ourselves but also for the environment. With Clean Food, Terry provides a road map to preparing delicious, nourishing meals.The cookbook is organized by season, which makes it easy to choose recipes that feature fruits and vegetables in their prime and readily available — mango salsa for summertime, for instance, or roasted squash with fennel and asparagus for fall. Clean Food also shares year-round recipes, like Terry’s decadent peanut butter chocolate chip cookies. (Most of the recipes are vegan, but you can add a little protein if you want.) It’s not easy to break the habit of eating processed foods — let’s face it, they’re convenient. Fresh foods can seem harder to find and more daunting to prepare, but Terry makes it easy to enjoy the rewards of better eating.

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Terry
    Terry

    Thanks Daily Grommet for the great review of my book. For the past nine years, I¹ve been teaching people to make delicious, healthy foods to nourish themselves and their families. I¹ve seen first-hand the improvement it makes in their lives and I believe can make in everyone¹s lives. If you¹re already making healthy food choices, this book will give you 223 new recipes to try! If you need to change your eating habits, this book will deliciously guide you to a healthier lifestyle. Your quality of life will forever be affected by the healthy choices you make today! I look forward to reading your comments!

  • Don McNeill
    Don McNeill
    9/25/2009 12:24 PM

    Although I am not a vegan I could not agree more with Terry's concept. This summer I had my kids help me plant, maintain and harvest vegetables and fresh herbs from our garden. The freshness of the flavors really comes through the closer you can get to the source. But I always need more recipes!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/25/2009 1:16 PM

    I don't know if I'm getting wiser with age or if I'm just reacting to a societal emphasis on eating better but I find myself searching out and craving healthier foods. It simply makes sense to me that our bodies were designed for, and therefore run best when, eating foods in their natural state. Of course habits and acquired tastes are hard to change! I love that it sounds like this book gives you baby steps like the Oatmeal example in the video. Can you share with us any other easy 'small change in the right direction' examples?

  • Jane
    Jane
    9/25/2009 3:22 PM

    How would you rate the guide and recipes on the "kid friendly" scale? I love the idea, but always feel like I'm cooking for the world's toughest critics!

  • claudia
    claudia
    9/25/2009 3:49 PM

    One of my biggest challenges in eating "clean" is the preparation time (cleaning, chopping, etc). Your time-saving tips are appreciated!

  • joanne domeniconi
    joanne domeniconi
    9/25/2009 4:41 PM

    I really like the way Terry addresses some pretty exotic ingredients with easy, straight forward recipes. I'm adventurous but never know what to do with all those wonderful looking green leafy vegetables, whole grains and legumes. A great guide.

  • Jennifer
    Jennifer – Grommet Team
    9/25/2009 4:52 PM

    @JGL I feel your pain. My kids are not so keen on dark leafy greens but I keep trying. There are plenty of kid friendly recipes. Terry used her two children as testers for the cook book. Here are some examples of kid friendly recipes including Banana Coconut Chocolate Chip Cookies, Spiced Sweet Potato Fries, Mexican Layer Dip and plenty of grain and pasta recipes that hide the good stuff. All of the above recipes have a little twist!

  • Terry Walters
    Terry Walters
    9/25/2009 5:02 PM

    Hi Katherine,

    If you don't know where to begin, try bringing home one new produce item a week, look in the back of the book at the index and pick a recipe to start with. If you select something green, chances are you can toss it in with your green leaf salad or saute it with garlic and olive oil and you've got a hit! Another trick is to put your grains in a bowl and cover them with water. You can do this at night before you go to bed. In the morning, they'll need less water and less time to cook and will be easier to digest. Most of all, have fun!

  • Linda
    Linda
    9/25/2009 6:12 PM

    Another good Grommet idea!

    Terry, in the winter months when its hard to get fresh produce, do you use frozen veggies? I think some of the frozen vegetables taste very good when fresh is not available.

  • Jennifer
    Jennifer – Grommet Team
    9/25/2009 7:06 PM

    @Claudia I picked up a great tip on cooking with legumes from CLEAN FOOD. You can freeze already soaked legumes. I like this because I can soak beans over the weekend and then use them later.

  • terry Walters
    terry Walters
    9/25/2009 7:31 PM

    I often wonder what it means to be "kid friendly." Everyone in my family has different tastes and preferences - sometimes they overlap, other times they don't. Instead of trying to get my children to eat certain foods, I concentrate on setting a good example, talking about the choices I'm making for myself, helping them understand how to make choices (like eating a rainbow of colors), and involving them in the process (from shopping to cooking and even serving). Like everything else in parenthood, the rest is just a matter of praying that they embrace what you're trying to teach them, and apply it when it counts!

    That said, I must have put collards and kale on the table for dinner 5 nights a week for over a year before they realized, "this is what dinner is" and started to eat them. Now, they are among their favorites.

    I'd give CLEAN FOOD a 10 on the kid friendly scale - not because they're going to devour every recipe (although they might), but because by sharing the CLEAN FOOD adventure, the whole family will be nourished.

  • terry Walters
    terry Walters
    9/25/2009 7:38 PM

    Frozen veggies, canned beans, dried herbs... These are all great time saving tricks that I keep on hand in my kitchen. Eating clean is about eating close to the source and making healthy choices, but sometime we simply don't have access to fresh produce or the time to make them. I'd much rather saute an onion with celery and carrots, add frozen corn, rice milk, simmer and puree for a quick and easy corn chowder, than grab something even more processed and less nutritional. Add a healthy dose of love in the pot with your frozen vegetables to make them even more nourishing!

  • terry Walters
    terry Walters
    9/25/2009 7:42 PM

    My children started most of the seeds for our garden this year and my youngest planted an entire flat of arugula. When it was finally time to enjoy the fruits of their labors, she took one bite and hated it! The outcome? First, she didn't hesitate for a second to taste it. And second, as soon as it got rejected she immediately started talking about what she was going to plant next year! Not all of our experiments will be successes, but you have to play the game to win!

  • Terry Walters
    Terry Walters
    9/25/2009 7:55 PM

    PS: To JGL - my experience is that we, as moms, are much tougher on ourselves than our children are. Granted, nobody likes the "disgusting" response to something they've prepared with love and good intention, but while we hold onto that rejection, our children are quickly on to the next thing! Serve something that's a sure bet at every meal, have fun experimenting and be kind to yourself along the way.

  • terry Walters
    terry Walters
    9/25/2009 8:01 PM

    Hi Claudia,

    A couple of new tricks that have helped me recently. I love the golden beets at the farmers market, but if I put them in the refrigerator when I get home, they sit there until they go bad. Instead, before I unpack any of my produce, I put a pot of water on the stove to boil, add the beets and cover. I don't even wash them first! While I unpack, the beets cook and when they're soft I turn off the heat. Eventually, once they're cool enough to touch, I hold them under running water and push off the outer skins (sometimes I do this immediately, sometimes hours later)! Then you can cut them however you desire or even just place them whole in a covered bowl in your refrigerator. Now they're ready to go, whether you want to toss them will dressing, other vegetables or simply add them to a green salad.

  • terry Walters
    terry Walters
    9/25/2009 8:04 PM

    Another trick that comes in handy during the fall when I'm harvesting the herbs from my garden is to puree them in a food processor with olive oil and then transfer your creation into ice-cube trays and freeze it for a quick and easy taste of summer all winter long!

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    9/27/2009 5:18 PM

    Terry....I really agree with your advice that the best way to get the weird foods into a person's diet (kids in particular) is to always have a sure bet food on the table too (rice, bread, whatever works for your family) alongside the adventurous ones. It's too upsetting to face a total adventure for every component of a dinner, and the goal is just to get some trial and error going Having a familiar dish helps stave off the fear factor.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    12/8/2009 2:11 PM

    A huge congratulations to Clean Food for these two wonderful recognitions:

    1. The World Gourmand Awards has named CLEAN FOOD the "Best Vegetarian Cuisine Cookbook" for the USA and will go on to compete for "Best in the World" at the Paris Cookbook Fair in February 2010!

    2. CLEAN FOOD was selected by NPR (National Public Radio) as one of their "Top Ten Cookbooks of 2009!"

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

Clean Food

by Terry Walters

Clean Plate

Ever feel like it’s impossible to really change the way you eat? Clean Food can help you get over that hurdle.

More than just a cookbook, Clean Food is a guide to making healthy choices. Terry Walters teaches readers about the benefits of choosing living plants, not processed food, and eating close to the source — meaning food travels fewer steps to get from where it was grown to your table. She’s passionate about making a commitment to naturally grown foods, not only for ourselves but also for the environment.


With Clean Food, Terry provides a road map to preparing delicious, nourishing meals.The cookbook is organized by season, which makes it easy to choose recipes that feature fruits and vegetables in their prime and readily available — mango salsa for summertime, for instance, or roasted squash with fennel and asparagus for fall. Clean Food also shares year-round recipes, like Terry’s decadent peanut butter chocolate chip cookies. (Most of the recipes are vegan, but you can add a little protein if you want.)

It’s not easy to break the habit of eating processed foods — let’s face it, they’re convenient. Fresh foods can seem harder to find and more daunting to prepare, but Terry makes it easy to enjoy the rewards of better eating.
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Clean Food: Eat Clean, Live Well by Terry Walters
No longer available

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Terry
    Terry

    Thanks Daily Grommet for the great review of my book. For the past nine years, I¹ve been teaching people to make delicious, healthy foods to nourish themselves and their families. I¹ve seen first-hand the improvement it makes in their lives and I believe can make in everyone¹s lives. If you¹re already making healthy food choices, this book will give you 223 new recipes to try! If you need to change your eating habits, this book will deliciously guide you to a healthier lifestyle. Your quality of life will forever be affected by the healthy choices you make today! I look forward to reading your comments!

  • Don McNeill
    Don McNeill
    9/25/2009 12:24 PM

    Although I am not a vegan I could not agree more with Terry's concept. This summer I had my kids help me plant, maintain and harvest vegetables and fresh herbs from our garden. The freshness of the flavors really comes through the closer you can get to the source. But I always need more recipes!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/25/2009 1:16 PM

    I don't know if I'm getting wiser with age or if I'm just reacting to a societal emphasis on eating better but I find myself searching out and craving healthier foods. It simply makes sense to me that our bodies were designed for, and therefore run best when, eating foods in their natural state. Of course habits and acquired tastes are hard to change! I love that it sounds like this book gives you baby steps like the Oatmeal example in the video. Can you share with us any other easy 'small change in the right direction' examples?

  • Jane
    Jane
    9/25/2009 3:22 PM

    How would you rate the guide and recipes on the "kid friendly" scale? I love the idea, but always feel like I'm cooking for the world's toughest critics!

  • claudia
    claudia
    9/25/2009 3:49 PM

    One of my biggest challenges in eating "clean" is the preparation time (cleaning, chopping, etc). Your time-saving tips are appreciated!

  • joanne domeniconi
    joanne domeniconi
    9/25/2009 4:41 PM

    I really like the way Terry addresses some pretty exotic ingredients with easy, straight forward recipes. I'm adventurous but never know what to do with all those wonderful looking green leafy vegetables, whole grains and legumes. A great guide.

  • Jennifer
    Jennifer – Grommet Team
    9/25/2009 4:52 PM

    @JGL I feel your pain. My kids are not so keen on dark leafy greens but I keep trying. There are plenty of kid friendly recipes. Terry used her two children as testers for the cook book. Here are some examples of kid friendly recipes including Banana Coconut Chocolate Chip Cookies, Spiced Sweet Potato Fries, Mexican Layer Dip and plenty of grain and pasta recipes that hide the good stuff. All of the above recipes have a little twist!

  • Terry Walters
    Terry Walters
    9/25/2009 5:02 PM

    Hi Katherine,

    If you don't know where to begin, try bringing home one new produce item a week, look in the back of the book at the index and pick a recipe to start with. If you select something green, chances are you can toss it in with your green leaf salad or saute it with garlic and olive oil and you've got a hit! Another trick is to put your grains in a bowl and cover them with water. You can do this at night before you go to bed. In the morning, they'll need less water and less time to cook and will be easier to digest. Most of all, have fun!

  • Linda
    Linda
    9/25/2009 6:12 PM

    Another good Grommet idea!

    Terry, in the winter months when its hard to get fresh produce, do you use frozen veggies? I think some of the frozen vegetables taste very good when fresh is not available.

  • Jennifer
    Jennifer – Grommet Team
    9/25/2009 7:06 PM

    @Claudia I picked up a great tip on cooking with legumes from CLEAN FOOD. You can freeze already soaked legumes. I like this because I can soak beans over the weekend and then use them later.

  • terry Walters
    terry Walters
    9/25/2009 7:31 PM

    I often wonder what it means to be "kid friendly." Everyone in my family has different tastes and preferences - sometimes they overlap, other times they don't. Instead of trying to get my children to eat certain foods, I concentrate on setting a good example, talking about the choices I'm making for myself, helping them understand how to make choices (like eating a rainbow of colors), and involving them in the process (from shopping to cooking and even serving). Like everything else in parenthood, the rest is just a matter of praying that they embrace what you're trying to teach them, and apply it when it counts!

    That said, I must have put collards and kale on the table for dinner 5 nights a week for over a year before they realized, "this is what dinner is" and started to eat them. Now, they are among their favorites.

    I'd give CLEAN FOOD a 10 on the kid friendly scale - not because they're going to devour every recipe (although they might), but because by sharing the CLEAN FOOD adventure, the whole family will be nourished.

  • terry Walters
    terry Walters
    9/25/2009 7:38 PM

    Frozen veggies, canned beans, dried herbs... These are all great time saving tricks that I keep on hand in my kitchen. Eating clean is about eating close to the source and making healthy choices, but sometime we simply don't have access to fresh produce or the time to make them. I'd much rather saute an onion with celery and carrots, add frozen corn, rice milk, simmer and puree for a quick and easy corn chowder, than grab something even more processed and less nutritional. Add a healthy dose of love in the pot with your frozen vegetables to make them even more nourishing!

  • terry Walters
    terry Walters
    9/25/2009 7:42 PM

    My children started most of the seeds for our garden this year and my youngest planted an entire flat of arugula. When it was finally time to enjoy the fruits of their labors, she took one bite and hated it! The outcome? First, she didn't hesitate for a second to taste it. And second, as soon as it got rejected she immediately started talking about what she was going to plant next year! Not all of our experiments will be successes, but you have to play the game to win!

  • Terry Walters
    Terry Walters
    9/25/2009 7:55 PM

    PS: To JGL - my experience is that we, as moms, are much tougher on ourselves than our children are. Granted, nobody likes the "disgusting" response to something they've prepared with love and good intention, but while we hold onto that rejection, our children are quickly on to the next thing! Serve something that's a sure bet at every meal, have fun experimenting and be kind to yourself along the way.

  • terry Walters
    terry Walters
    9/25/2009 8:01 PM

    Hi Claudia,

    A couple of new tricks that have helped me recently. I love the golden beets at the farmers market, but if I put them in the refrigerator when I get home, they sit there until they go bad. Instead, before I unpack any of my produce, I put a pot of water on the stove to boil, add the beets and cover. I don't even wash them first! While I unpack, the beets cook and when they're soft I turn off the heat. Eventually, once they're cool enough to touch, I hold them under running water and push off the outer skins (sometimes I do this immediately, sometimes hours later)! Then you can cut them however you desire or even just place them whole in a covered bowl in your refrigerator. Now they're ready to go, whether you want to toss them will dressing, other vegetables or simply add them to a green salad.

  • terry Walters
    terry Walters
    9/25/2009 8:04 PM

    Another trick that comes in handy during the fall when I'm harvesting the herbs from my garden is to puree them in a food processor with olive oil and then transfer your creation into ice-cube trays and freeze it for a quick and easy taste of summer all winter long!

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    9/27/2009 5:18 PM

    Terry....I really agree with your advice that the best way to get the weird foods into a person's diet (kids in particular) is to always have a sure bet food on the table too (rice, bread, whatever works for your family) alongside the adventurous ones. It's too upsetting to face a total adventure for every component of a dinner, and the goal is just to get some trial and error going Having a familiar dish helps stave off the fear factor.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    12/8/2009 2:11 PM

    A huge congratulations to Clean Food for these two wonderful recognitions:

    1. The World Gourmand Awards has named CLEAN FOOD the "Best Vegetarian Cuisine Cookbook" for the USA and will go on to compete for "Best in the World" at the Paris Cookbook Fair in February 2010!

    2. CLEAN FOOD was selected by NPR (National Public Radio) as one of their "Top Ten Cookbooks of 2009!"

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.