Quick Fix for Rips

One bright side of the lousy economy is that we’re all a little less wasteful and more apt to fix, rather than replace, damaged goods. During the 1930s, Val “the Bish” Cismoski came up with a way to quickly repair canvas belts on steam-powered machinery, so farmers wouldn’t have to lose precious harvesting time to replace a torn belt. Fast-forward 75 years, and we’re putting the same formula to use mending ripped clothes, torn seat cushions and frayed shoelaces. Tear Mender is a natural and non-toxic liquid adhesive that bonds fabric upon contact. You can apply it like glue on a tear, or spread it on a fabric patch, and it bonds in minutes. Repaired fabrics stay flexible and soft even after washing, says Jerry Cismoski, (on the left) who is the Bish’s son and runs the third-generation company. So if you’ve got a dropped hem, a broken belt loop, or a run in the carpet, give Tear Mender a try. It also works great on tears in the seat of your car, damaged sports gear, or rips in a tent (it’s waterproof and UV-resistant). Why throw out something that you can easily repair with Tear Mender?

Tear Mender

Liquid Fabric Repair Adhesive

Quick Fix for Rips

One bright side of the lousy economy is that we’re all a little less wasteful and more apt to fix, rather than replace, damaged goods. During the 1930s, Val “the Bish” Cismoski came up with a way to quickly repair canvas belts on steam-powered machinery, so farmers wouldn’t have to lose precious harvesting time to replace a torn belt. Fast-forward 75 years, and we’re putting the same formula to use mending ripped clothes, torn seat cushions and frayed shoelaces. Tear Mender is a natural and non-toxic liquid adhesive that bonds fabric upon contact. You can apply it like glue on a tear, or spread it on a fabric patch, and it bonds in minutes. Repaired fabrics stay flexible and soft even after washing, says Jerry Cismoski, (on the left) who is the Bish’s son and runs the third-generation company. So if you’ve got a dropped hem, a broken belt loop, or a run in the carpet, give Tear Mender a try. It also works great on tears in the seat of your car, damaged sports gear, or rips in a tent (it’s waterproof and UV-resistant). Why throw out something that you can easily repair with Tear Mender?
Sustainable Living

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Jeff
    Jeff

    Hi Everyone! I’m excited to have Bish's Original Tear Mender featured as today’s Grommet. Tear Mender is a natural, non-toxic, fabric adhesive that has been giving customers permanent, washproof, flexible bonds for over 77 years. Developed by my grandfather (aka 'The Bish') in 1932, Tear Mender is ideal for repairing anything from dropped hems, to attaching scout patches, to fixing leather furniture, to patching acrylic patio umbrellas! It's fast, easy, and best of all it's permanent so once you make that repair, you won't have to worry about it every again. Bish's Original Tear Mender bonds are wearable in 3 minutes and machine washable in 15 minutes.

    I'm online to answer any questions you may have on types of repairs or any general questions about Tear Mender.

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 12:12 PM

    My mind is on a "tear" now. Jeff...I don't how this can work on a car seat...do you put a backing fabric under the rip, or literally bond the torn edges back together?

  • Mary
    Mary
    9/23/2009 12:14 PM

    My favorite use for Tear Mender is for hemming bedskirts/dust ruffles. They are never the right length. I hem them right on the bed - takes just a few minutes!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 12:18 PM

    I'm blown away by this simple product.

    I priced this out at a local chain store and Daily Grommet is offering 6.5 oz at a price that is LESS THAN what they are selling a 2 oz bottle for. Add in free shipping and this is a deal not to be missed!

    In the video Joanne remarks that she "can think of 101 uses" for this product. I think that would be a fun challenge! Let's see if we can come up with 101 uses for this product. If you have used, will use, could use, or heard of using TearMender for a task...let us know. Mary - yours is #1!

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 12:19 PM

    Jules - for a tear in a car seat or other upholstery, insert a patch or other backing fabric into the hole/tear/etc, then apply the Tear Mender into the hole and spread the adhesive with your finger or applicator wand (included in the 1/2oz bottle) then press the upholstery fabric down onto the backing fabric. If it's leather or other less-breathable fabric, it may take upto 30 minutes to fully dry. I hope that helps

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 12:21 PM

    Okay - #2 is repairing a tear in a car seat.

  • Wendy
    Wendy – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 12:22 PM

    #3 -- ripped ski pants/jacket. Those are an expensive replacement item -- thanks for getting us through the winter!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 12:23 PM

    #4 - I am absolutely, positively, using this to reinforce my son's jeans that always split open on the same knee within the first month - and unlike Sara's daughter, he doesn't like the holes!

    #5 - Boy Scout patches - no more hand-sewing for me...that was tough on the fingers!

  • Desmond
    Desmond
    9/23/2009 12:39 PM

    Perfect timing. While sitting at my son's soccer match just yesterday, I realized I have a quite-visible hole in my most comfortable pair of jeans in just the wrong place. I've been thinking today about how to fix them w/o having one of those bulky patches that would not feel comfortable. Then today's Grommet comes in and "problem solved." Going to buy a bottle now. P.S. I love the idea of fixing car seats as I have a tear in one and I had no clue how to fix it. Thanks!

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 12:42 PM

    Has anyone had that pair of shoes that irks them because the lace has frayed at the end and you know its going to be a bear to re-lace? Put a drop of Tear Mender on the end and roll the lace tip between your fingers and voila! a new lace tip. Sometimes the little repairs are the most gratifying.

  • Catherine
    Catherine
    9/23/2009 12:47 PM

    Wow--DG was reading my mind...I have qty 14 (augh) horse blankets to ready for the coming fall/winter. Each has various rips, tears and fraying straps needing repair.

    Replacing the blankets=appx $1500..gulp...

    Pro cleaning & repair=appx $500...gulp...

    I'd been pricing out fabric repair kits online, and it was starting to look like it would cost several hundred dollars for the amount I would need...gulp and quivery lower lip.

    Daily Grommet and the "Bish" to the rescue!! I think I'm in love....Thank you! And the horses also thank you! Off to place my order now....

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 12:51 PM

    Okay so:

    #6 is @DJP's fixing a hole in favorite jeans

    #7 is @Jeff's fix for fraying laces

    #8 is @Catherine's fixing horse blankets

  • Jess
    Jess
    9/23/2009 1:13 PM

    I will be making a Halloween Costume using polarfleece. I will be cutting out circles for spots and attaching them to the costume, will this fabric glue work on this type of fabric, too? It would be great if I didn't have to sew them on.

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 1:29 PM

    Jess - Most likely yes. Tear Mender works on most fleece and only has issues with the highly exploded fleece (very thick; significant space between fabric core and surface) where the Tear Mender does not have the ability to penetrate the fabric core.

  • Barbara
    Barbara – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 2:01 PM

    #9 We just got a new puppy. Yogi is so adorable but definitely in the nippy stage. This will be great to repair all the little cuff snags we're expecting during puppy training days.

  • Joe
    Joe
    9/23/2009 2:40 PM

    This product is amazing! I am accident prone and ripped my new leather jacket...you can't even tell the difference. BUY THIS PRODUCT!

  • Lynn
    Lynn
    9/23/2009 2:45 PM

    I've used it to repair my pants hem while I work. Accidentally caught the hem on a heel and had no way to fix it. A co-worker gave me this glue to fix it. Worked like a charm!

  • Shannon
    Shannon
    9/23/2009 2:56 PM

    #10 - ripped leather jacket (from Joe)

    #11 - repair hem in pants (from Lynn)

    #12 - this is mine...I used it today on a button that was starting to loosen on my shirt. It was starting to unravel so I put a little tear mender on the thread behind the button and it won't unravel any more! I won't have to get out the needle & thread!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 3:02 PM

    #13 @Jess - Halloween costumes!

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 3:05 PM

    #14 and #15 I have two shoe repairs in mind. One is a cloth eyelet on a favorite summer shoe, and the other is to fasten down a piece of flapping trim on my "take no prisoners" lace-up leather boots.

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 3:23 PM

    Fringe use: Because Tear Mender is natural and non-toxic, many show dog owners use it to 'train' the dogs ears while they are puppies so they will stay formed properly. It is easily removable from the dogs hair with dish soap or baby oil. Who knew?

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 3:25 PM

    Phyllis in our office uses Tear Mender to decorate flower pots with fabric pieces.

  • Mary Jo, as told to Facebook fan page
    Mary Jo, as told to Facebook fan page
    9/23/2009 3:27 PM

    #16 Jeff's dog ear forming! and #17 My husband sliced the couch arm swinging a golf club in the family room (I know those of you that know Kelly can't believe he was swinging a golf club). I placed my order and can't wait to use this!!! Thanks Daily Grommet!

  • LINDA
    LINDA
    9/23/2009 3:32 PM

    I HAVE USED TEAR MENDER FOR YEARS, A FRIEND TURNED ME ON TO IT. I USE IT TO MEND MY COMFORTER WHEN THE SEAMS COME APART FROM TO MANY WASHINGS. ONE TIME DOES IT. I HAVE ALSO USED IT TO HEM PANTS, I AM SHORT AND MUST HEM ALL PANTS. THE BELT LOOP REPAIR IS THE BEST.

  • Sara
    Sara – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 4:22 PM

    A few years ago I had repaired a pair of very soft expensive suede pants. There was a small tear in the backside and I thought they were goners. I found a specialty seamstress that did fine repair work like that. I was so happy to get them back and they looked great, even though it cost $40. You could not see the repair at all from the outside but when I looked closely on the inside, I could tell it had been glued somehow. I think she used a couple drops of TearMender! She did very well on that repair job!

  • Kathy Good
    Kathy Good
    9/23/2009 4:24 PM

    I use Tear Mender to put up the kids drawings on the window....no muss, no fuss! Can also decorate the window....just use food coloring!

  • Kathy
    Kathy
    9/23/2009 4:28 PM

    Gramma Phyllis mends all the boys jeans with this product! What would we do without her or tear mender?

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 4:29 PM

    Sara - Your story is more common than you'd think. To put it in perspective, the Daily Grommet kit would do 150+ of your suede pant repairs! Save time AND money!

  • MARTY
    MARTY
    9/23/2009 4:35 PM

    Jeff, can you use Tearmender to repair small moth holes in wool clothes? Thank you.

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 4:36 PM

    This is great! I think we're up to 23 uses! (#18 decorating pots, #19 comforter seams, #20 belt loop, #21 suede pants, #22 hanging drawings on window, #23 mending jeans) I love the ideas and the energy! Keep them coming!

  • Tanya
    Tanya
    9/23/2009 5:09 PM

    Ha! Train dog ears!! LOL This sounds like a miracle solution. I always wished I had learned to sew as a kid, but now I can just get this TearMender. We have a rip in the cover to our barbeque grill that I will use it on as soon as it arrives.

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 5:10 PM

    I have two good ones! How about all those bindings on area rugs that unravel or come unstitched, and the same for the trims on on lamp shades? #24 and #25. And Marty gets #26 for the wool clothes...conditional on Jeff's response.

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 5:11 PM

    Marty - Tear Mender is ideal for repair wool! Depending on the location of the holes, and what you are looking for in the aesthetics of the repair, you may not need a backing material (patch). If the hole is small you can put a drop of Tear Mender on your finger and just pinch the hole closed. The Tear Mender will bond the fabric together permanently. For a more aesthetic repair, I recommend you repair it inside-out to have the repair on the inside as it will be less visible. If the hole is dime-size or larger, you may want to use a patch or backing material.

  • Ginny
    Ginny
    9/23/2009 5:14 PM

    I volunteer at the Salvation Army clothes dropoff box in our town and we get alot of clothes that have tears and holes. There are a few of us who try to mend them as best we can, but its timing consuming and some of us aren't as young as we used to be! Thank you for telling me about this and for making it affordable.

    (Does this count as one of your numbers?)

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 5:16 PM

    Tanya - you get #27! Tear Mender is weather proof so you won't have to worry about the durability of the grill cover.

    Key piece of info that was covered in the video and I want to reiterate - Tear Mender only sticks to things it can penetrate so it will permanently bond to the fabric material on the inside of your grill cover, but will rub right off (without harming the surface) the non-porous surface on the outside of the grill cover. The same concept applies for leather, vinyl, etc.

  • joanne
    joanne – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 6:23 PM

    One piece of advice. Use Tear Mender sparingly as instructed. A little goes a long way. I used too much on the first project I did and I saturated some fleece through to the other side. On my second attempt I used a piece of paper to create a barrier and less Tear Mender for an invisible - perfect result.

  • Shannon
    Shannon
    9/23/2009 6:25 PM

    #28 - Repairing the vinyl top on our poker table. Somehow my husband and/or one of his buddies managed to put a tear in our vinyl topped poker table. I was able to put Tear Mender on the underneath side of the tear and it sealed it right up. Now if Tear Mender could just solve my problem of my husband hosting his annual Fantasy Football Draft at our house every year!!!

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 8:18 PM

    Ginny--OH man that is so #29. I love the idea of saving your Army of volunteers hours and hours of time. People need your donations deployed as fast as possible, and hopefully we can save some eyesight too. WOW. OK I think I have #30. The steering wheel on our used "grandpa" car has a tear in its cover. Fixed!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 8:19 PM

    @Shannon ...hmmm if all the guys went home with fabric hearts glued to the back of their pants, they might think twice about coming back next year!

    #31 - I bet this would work to repair a hole in a favorite pair of socks

    #32 - We can't forget the use in the video of stabilizing a perfectly fashionable hole in a pair of jeans so that it doesn't get bigger.

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 8:32 PM

    #33 along the lines of Kathy hanging pictures on the window; hang things (pictures, lists, artwork, etc) on the refrigerator. While Tear Mender is permanent in fabric, it will hold things to non-porous surfaces and wipe off if you want to remove. Ideal for all the new, stainless appliances that don't like magnets.

  • Jeff from WI
    Jeff from WI
    9/23/2009 10:46 PM

    We have been using Tear Mender for about a year and it really works! Great Stuff!

  • David
    David
    9/23/2009 10:46 PM

    # 34 repairing laundered+shrunken fitted sheets that rip near the corners when they're being stretched back onto the mattress.

  • Ann
    Ann
    9/24/2009 8:24 AM

    I use Tear Mender to fix all of my sons jeans & pants. Works like a charm!!!

  • Amy
    Amy
    9/24/2009 9:05 AM

    I use Tear Mender to join skeins of yarn when I'm knitting. You just put a dab on your finger and roll the two ends together. Since Tear Mender is washproof, (and strong you can see in the video) I don't ever have to worry about it coming undone!

  • Kim
    Kim
    9/24/2009 9:22 AM

    Hello!!, I really like your idea about using the tearmender to glue things onto my new stainless steel refrigerator. Would it harm the surface of the stainless steel at all? I miss all my kids drawings hung up there.

    another idea is winter ski glove repairs... they are always getting rips and we used to toss them.

  • JJ
    JJ
    9/24/2009 9:25 AM

    I use tear mender to close the holes I get in the same spot on all my socks. Buys me another year of wear!

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/24/2009 10:18 AM

    Kim - Tear Mender will not harm the surface of the refrigerator. Tear Mender is unique in that it does not contain any harmful chemicals or solvents and therefore will not damage the surface of anything it cannot penetrate (steel, varnished wood, leather, vinyl, etc) and will simply peel off the surface without leaving any residue.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/24/2009 10:29 AM

    #35 @Amy joins skeins of yarn while knitting,

    #36 @Kim repairing ski gloves

    @JJ confirms #31 that this does work on socks and @Ann confirms that it's wonderful for jeans. Thank you!

    #37 I had the pleasure of speaking to Jerry from TearMender and he told me about another interesting use. Those who are required to work out in wet fields/areas spread Tear Mender on the bottom 6-7 inches of their jeans. This stops the water from wicking up the pant leg keeping them drier! That makes me think there's somehow an opportunity to use this with kids winter gloves/clothes as an extra barrier against the wetness of playing in the snow.

  • Shannon
    Shannon
    9/24/2009 11:32 AM

    #38 - @Kathy's suggestion of decorating windows - I don't think we gave that one a number. I tried it last night and found out that you can dip a sponge in Tear Mender then dab it all over a window. I used it on a window in the front of our house and it is still clear but nobody can see in my windows! If you goof up, it peels right off!

    #39 - Scrapbooking! I glue pictures, etc into a scrapbook for my kids. It is much faster than tape and it just takes a little. Once again, if you goof then you can peel it off!

  • Hannah
    Hannah
    9/24/2009 1:03 PM

    I know I'm late to the party, but my husband and I came up with a few potential uses for the bottle I ordered. I hope we won't be fighting over it!

    He makes furniture and he needs it for a few things also.

    Holding chair spindles in place so they don't come loose.

    Using it to secure ceiling and baseboard moldings.

    Joining wood edge-to-edge more securely when making tables.

    Helping to keep hinges on doorframes tight.

    Keeping older glass window panes from rattling.

    Patching torn linoleum or sheet vinyl so the edges don't curl up.

    Holding letter or number stick-ons on house or mailbox more securely without having to make holes in them.

    Securing candles on a dish or holder so they don't tip over.

    Securing labels to canning jars. The ones you buy usually don't stay on for very long.

    Mending (finally, I hope) our dog's favorite toy. She loves her plush soccer ball to death but the seams are no match for her teeth. I've sewn them time after time but the stuffing keeps coming out. I've even bought her replacements but they all wind up the same. I'm hoping that this will solve our biggest problem! lol

    I'm sure we'll think of many more!

  • Drew
    Drew
    9/24/2009 1:53 PM

    I have used this for years! I don't have any idea how to sew. This is my 911 in a bottle! Recent repairs: scuffed top layer of leather on pair of dress shoes. It fixed the underside without hurting the finished (shiny) surface. Dab of glue on my dress shirt button string that came loose. Fallen cuff on 2 pairs of dress pants. Hole in dress pants pocket. Also- took a pair of my son’s jeans that he out grew and made jean shorts out of them. I used Tear Mender along the cut end to keep the jeans from fraying, but keeping the integrity of the cut look. THANK YOU TEAR MENDER!

  • Don Coltman
    Don Coltman
    9/24/2009 4:22 PM

    I have known about TEAR MENDER for over 40 years but never took the time to test it out. About 4 years ago I found the need to mend my mooring cover on my speed boat because of mil-dew spots. TEAR MENDER worked on over 30 of the effected areas which extended the life of my $900.00 mooring cover for an additional 2 plus years.

    I still have 2/3s of the bottle left. Why did I wait 40 years to use it? Don Coltman.

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/24/2009 5:33 PM

    Hannah - Great list of ideas. While Tear Mender is ideal for many of the ideas you share (labels on jars, mending dog toys, etc), I wanted to clarify with some not so familiar with the product, that some of the ideas provide the result you describe but are not structural bonds. For example Tear Mender will take the wiggle out of a dowel, it is not a permanent, structural repairs meaning you can pull the dowel out. This same concept goes for the door hinge, window rattle, and house number idea. Again, great ideas, but not a permanent solution.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/24/2009 11:54 PM

    @Hannah - you can never be late to a party that doesn't end! Thanks for adding # 40 - #49!

    @Drew "911 in a bottle" is great. Thanks for #50-54

    @Don #55 - mending a mooring cover.

    Wow.

  • William
    William
    9/28/2009 5:17 PM

    I gladly join the chorus of praisers but have nonetheless one problem:

    is it possible to get the Bish's latex OUT of a jean's cuff (accidently put the latex on the wrong side of the fabric....100% cotton) or a favorite shirt (half cotton, half polyester--accidently brushed against repair in-progress)?

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/28/2009 7:20 PM

    @William we've alerted Jeff to stop back and let us all know the answer!

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/29/2009 8:31 AM

    William - One of the great things of Tear Mender is that it is permanent, and likewise, one of the challenges is that it is permanent! If you do happen to spill some or brush against something, the Tear Mender can be removed while still liquid by saturating the area with water and working the adhesive out of the material. In the event that the Tear Mender has cured, we have learned over the years from a few of our customers that a product named Detachol will soften the cured Tear Mender and allow it to be scraped out. Detachol is an adhesive remover used in the medical industry and is safe for use on most fabrics. We do not have an affiliation with Detachol, but I am happy to recommend it as a remover that has worked for many of our customers in the unfortunate circumstance where Tear Mender gets in the wrong place. I hope that helps and thanks to all for using Bish's Original Tear Mender.

  • william
    william
    10/1/2009 12:56 AM

    Thanks, Jeff, for the Detachol lead. I will check it out. Meanwhile, following the lead in another of the notes in this series, I tried Baby Oil and was amazed to see that within a very few minutes it turns the hardened latex into a substance like melted gum. It's still tricky to remove but it can be done with patience. Then, of course, there's the oil stain to deal with. I blotted it several times with paper towels then mixed Dawn (another miracle product) with other Grease remover solvents and rubbed etc then put in the washer. The shirt came out latex free but with a slight dark stain where it was and a larger fainter halo from the Baby Oil, but it's wearable again and I suspect repeated washings will mute the remnant stains too. Thank you!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    10/1/2009 11:45 AM

    @William - We sincerely appreciate that you stopped back to share your experience with all of us. Thank you!

  • gloria tenore
    gloria tenore
    10/7/2009 9:29 PM

    I have been using tear mender & loving it for years. However the last bottle I purchased, has all dried up. 16 fl. oz. It was tightly covered. Is there anything I can do? Thank You

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    10/7/2009 11:12 PM

    @Gloria if there's anything that can be done, Jeff will know the answer!

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    10/9/2009 7:42 AM

    Gloria - Thank you for your note. Tear Mender is a natural adhesive and does have a shelf life. Typical usable life of our product is 18 months from purchase although some last much longer than that. It sounds from your description, that the product has exceeded its usable life. Once the adhesive begins to solidify, nothing can be added to bring it back to usable form. If you have purchased the product within the last 12 months, you can send us a copy of your receipt and we will replace the product for you. Thanks for using Tear Mender - the only natural, non-toxic, instant fabric adhesive - since 1932.

  • Lyn
    Lyn
    11/20/2009 10:09 AM

    Please help! I spilled the tear mender on my cream colored sofa and don't know how to get out the stain.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/20/2009 11:10 AM

    Lyn, William (above) had a similar situation happen. Please refer to Jeff's response for his advice.

    We hope that you have a successful outcome.

  • nancy
    nancy
    10/9/2010 2:44 PM

    Tear mender arrived promptly but no fabric swatch or small additional container as advertized.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    10/9/2010 5:14 PM

    @nancy - when I ordered mine it came with both of these extra items, thank you for letting us know that yours didn't. We will look into this and contact you directly.

  • c. vogel
    c. vogel
    3/2/2011 7:39 PM

    I still have not received my tear mender and it was ordered at least a month ago. This is the second time I have sent you an email. Please respond.!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    3/3/2011 12:32 AM

    @c. vogel: Thanks for posting. We will look into it and let you know.

  • Tina
    Tina
    4/27/2011 4:08 PM

    I am a girl scout leader and we use this glue to attach all our patches. All the girls in my troop love this project and we passed it on to other troops. It's both permanent and washable.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    4/27/2011 4:17 PM

    @Tina: Great use for the TearMender. Sewing on those patches is a chore!

  • Lori
    Lori
    5/10/2011 12:25 PM

    i was wondering... will it work on leather?? my leather seats in my car has started to tear and saw this and wondered if it would work.

    thanks

    lori

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    5/10/2011 12:40 PM

    @Lori Jones: Yes! Jeff says for a tear in a car seat or other upholstery, insert a patch or other backing fabric into the hole/tear/etc, then apply the Tear Mender into the hole and spread the adhesive with your finger then press the upholstery fabric down onto the backing fabric. If it's leather or other less-breathable fabric, it may take upto 30 minutes to fully dry.

  • R
    R
    9/13/2011 9:18 PM

    I have a thin fabric cotton cardi that apparently got snagged on something and has little puncture holes. Would this do the trick without looking trashy? I love the cardi and I'm looking for an unnoticable fabric repair solution

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/13/2011 11:22 PM

    @R: This will help to stop the holes from getting worse, but it probably won't be able to close the hole up so that it isn't noticeable.

  • Tyf
    Tyf
    10/8/2011 4:12 AM

    This comment section doesn't mention the color: does tearmender have a selection of shades or is it clear?

    To repair a nylon black down shrug (it's dancer), I need a liquid to paint over some minor freying on the sleeves--to prevent holes/tears from developing--and a black color is preferred.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    10/8/2011 9:24 AM

    @Tyf: The liquid is white and it dries clear. However, one of the fabrics it is not recommended for is nylon.

  • Robbie Cornelius
    Robbie Cornelius
    11/1/2011 6:23 PM

    I have a seam rip in the upper back section of a leather jacket,along a vertical back seam. I do not have access to the rip from behind because of the lining. Can I use this product, with a piece of material under the rip to fix it?

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/2/2011 8:20 AM

    @Robbie Cornelius: This might work, but in this case your best solution would be to cut through some of the stitching in the lining so that you can access that rip and stitch it up. Then stitch the lining back up.

  • Malia
    Malia
    11/7/2011 12:15 AM

    My car seat ('leather') seam, vertical, is splitting. Would Tear Mender work? I won't be able to put a patch underneath, so am looking for something to put on the split to stop it.

    Thanks!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/21/2011 3:04 PM

    @Malia: It should help reinforce the weak area where your seam is splitting.

  • deborah
    deborah
    4/11/2012 7:04 PM

    Would it work with that green vinyl-y stuff you cover your outdoor furniture with? And will it hold? It gets very windy up here.

  • Chew-Hoong
    Chew-Hoong – Grommet Team
    4/14/2012 3:29 PM

    @Deb: Tear Mender does repair things made of vinyl. Check this video out to see how to apply the Tear Mender on vinyl materials. It's known to be durable, permanent and long lasting. Thank you for your interest.

  •  Lee Ann
    Lee Ann
    10/6/2012 5:27 PM

    Our pool cover is coming apart at the seams! Any chance we could use Tear Minder to keep it together? The material is a sort of plastic/canvas, I would guess.

  •  Lee Ann
    Lee Ann
    10/6/2012 5:31 PM

    @ Lee Ann sorry, I meant Tear Mender!

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

Tear Mender

Liquid Fabric Repair Adhesive

Quick Fix for Rips

One bright side of the lousy economy is that we’re all a little less wasteful and more apt to fix, rather than replace, damaged goods.

During the 1930s, Val “the Bish” Cismoski came up with a way to quickly repair canvas belts on steam-powered machinery, so farmers wouldn’t have to lose precious harvesting time to replace a torn
belt. Fast-forward 75 years, and we’re putting the same formula to use mending ripped clothes, torn seat cushions and frayed shoelaces.

Tear Mender is a natural and non-toxic liquid adhesive that bonds fabric upon contact. You can apply it like glue on a tear, or spread it on a fabric patch, and it bonds in minutes. Repaired fabrics stay flexible and soft even after washing, says Jerry Cismoski, (on the left) who is the Bish’s son and runs the third-generation company.

So if you’ve got a dropped hem, a broken belt loop, or a run in the carpet, give Tear Mender a try. It also works great on tears in the seat of your car, damaged sports gear, or rips in a tent (it’s waterproof and UV-resistant). Why throw out something that you can easily repair with Tear Mender?
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Tear Mender - Liquid Fabric Adhesive

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Jeff
    Jeff

    Hi Everyone! I’m excited to have Bish's Original Tear Mender featured as today’s Grommet. Tear Mender is a natural, non-toxic, fabric adhesive that has been giving customers permanent, washproof, flexible bonds for over 77 years. Developed by my grandfather (aka 'The Bish') in 1932, Tear Mender is ideal for repairing anything from dropped hems, to attaching scout patches, to fixing leather furniture, to patching acrylic patio umbrellas! It's fast, easy, and best of all it's permanent so once you make that repair, you won't have to worry about it every again. Bish's Original Tear Mender bonds are wearable in 3 minutes and machine washable in 15 minutes.

    I'm online to answer any questions you may have on types of repairs or any general questions about Tear Mender.

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 12:12 PM

    My mind is on a "tear" now. Jeff...I don't how this can work on a car seat...do you put a backing fabric under the rip, or literally bond the torn edges back together?

  • Mary
    Mary
    9/23/2009 12:14 PM

    My favorite use for Tear Mender is for hemming bedskirts/dust ruffles. They are never the right length. I hem them right on the bed - takes just a few minutes!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 12:18 PM

    I'm blown away by this simple product.

    I priced this out at a local chain store and Daily Grommet is offering 6.5 oz at a price that is LESS THAN what they are selling a 2 oz bottle for. Add in free shipping and this is a deal not to be missed!

    In the video Joanne remarks that she "can think of 101 uses" for this product. I think that would be a fun challenge! Let's see if we can come up with 101 uses for this product. If you have used, will use, could use, or heard of using TearMender for a task...let us know. Mary - yours is #1!

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 12:19 PM

    Jules - for a tear in a car seat or other upholstery, insert a patch or other backing fabric into the hole/tear/etc, then apply the Tear Mender into the hole and spread the adhesive with your finger or applicator wand (included in the 1/2oz bottle) then press the upholstery fabric down onto the backing fabric. If it's leather or other less-breathable fabric, it may take upto 30 minutes to fully dry. I hope that helps

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 12:21 PM

    Okay - #2 is repairing a tear in a car seat.

  • Wendy
    Wendy – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 12:22 PM

    #3 -- ripped ski pants/jacket. Those are an expensive replacement item -- thanks for getting us through the winter!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 12:23 PM

    #4 - I am absolutely, positively, using this to reinforce my son's jeans that always split open on the same knee within the first month - and unlike Sara's daughter, he doesn't like the holes!

    #5 - Boy Scout patches - no more hand-sewing for me...that was tough on the fingers!

  • Desmond
    Desmond
    9/23/2009 12:39 PM

    Perfect timing. While sitting at my son's soccer match just yesterday, I realized I have a quite-visible hole in my most comfortable pair of jeans in just the wrong place. I've been thinking today about how to fix them w/o having one of those bulky patches that would not feel comfortable. Then today's Grommet comes in and "problem solved." Going to buy a bottle now. P.S. I love the idea of fixing car seats as I have a tear in one and I had no clue how to fix it. Thanks!

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 12:42 PM

    Has anyone had that pair of shoes that irks them because the lace has frayed at the end and you know its going to be a bear to re-lace? Put a drop of Tear Mender on the end and roll the lace tip between your fingers and voila! a new lace tip. Sometimes the little repairs are the most gratifying.

  • Catherine
    Catherine
    9/23/2009 12:47 PM

    Wow--DG was reading my mind...I have qty 14 (augh) horse blankets to ready for the coming fall/winter. Each has various rips, tears and fraying straps needing repair.

    Replacing the blankets=appx $1500..gulp...

    Pro cleaning & repair=appx $500...gulp...

    I'd been pricing out fabric repair kits online, and it was starting to look like it would cost several hundred dollars for the amount I would need...gulp and quivery lower lip.

    Daily Grommet and the "Bish" to the rescue!! I think I'm in love....Thank you! And the horses also thank you! Off to place my order now....

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 12:51 PM

    Okay so:

    #6 is @DJP's fixing a hole in favorite jeans

    #7 is @Jeff's fix for fraying laces

    #8 is @Catherine's fixing horse blankets

  • Jess
    Jess
    9/23/2009 1:13 PM

    I will be making a Halloween Costume using polarfleece. I will be cutting out circles for spots and attaching them to the costume, will this fabric glue work on this type of fabric, too? It would be great if I didn't have to sew them on.

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 1:29 PM

    Jess - Most likely yes. Tear Mender works on most fleece and only has issues with the highly exploded fleece (very thick; significant space between fabric core and surface) where the Tear Mender does not have the ability to penetrate the fabric core.

  • Barbara
    Barbara – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 2:01 PM

    #9 We just got a new puppy. Yogi is so adorable but definitely in the nippy stage. This will be great to repair all the little cuff snags we're expecting during puppy training days.

  • Joe
    Joe
    9/23/2009 2:40 PM

    This product is amazing! I am accident prone and ripped my new leather jacket...you can't even tell the difference. BUY THIS PRODUCT!

  • Lynn
    Lynn
    9/23/2009 2:45 PM

    I've used it to repair my pants hem while I work. Accidentally caught the hem on a heel and had no way to fix it. A co-worker gave me this glue to fix it. Worked like a charm!

  • Shannon
    Shannon
    9/23/2009 2:56 PM

    #10 - ripped leather jacket (from Joe)

    #11 - repair hem in pants (from Lynn)

    #12 - this is mine...I used it today on a button that was starting to loosen on my shirt. It was starting to unravel so I put a little tear mender on the thread behind the button and it won't unravel any more! I won't have to get out the needle & thread!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 3:02 PM

    #13 @Jess - Halloween costumes!

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 3:05 PM

    #14 and #15 I have two shoe repairs in mind. One is a cloth eyelet on a favorite summer shoe, and the other is to fasten down a piece of flapping trim on my "take no prisoners" lace-up leather boots.

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 3:23 PM

    Fringe use: Because Tear Mender is natural and non-toxic, many show dog owners use it to 'train' the dogs ears while they are puppies so they will stay formed properly. It is easily removable from the dogs hair with dish soap or baby oil. Who knew?

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 3:25 PM

    Phyllis in our office uses Tear Mender to decorate flower pots with fabric pieces.

  • Mary Jo, as told to Facebook fan page
    Mary Jo, as told to Facebook fan page
    9/23/2009 3:27 PM

    #16 Jeff's dog ear forming! and #17 My husband sliced the couch arm swinging a golf club in the family room (I know those of you that know Kelly can't believe he was swinging a golf club). I placed my order and can't wait to use this!!! Thanks Daily Grommet!

  • LINDA
    LINDA
    9/23/2009 3:32 PM

    I HAVE USED TEAR MENDER FOR YEARS, A FRIEND TURNED ME ON TO IT. I USE IT TO MEND MY COMFORTER WHEN THE SEAMS COME APART FROM TO MANY WASHINGS. ONE TIME DOES IT. I HAVE ALSO USED IT TO HEM PANTS, I AM SHORT AND MUST HEM ALL PANTS. THE BELT LOOP REPAIR IS THE BEST.

  • Sara
    Sara – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 4:22 PM

    A few years ago I had repaired a pair of very soft expensive suede pants. There was a small tear in the backside and I thought they were goners. I found a specialty seamstress that did fine repair work like that. I was so happy to get them back and they looked great, even though it cost $40. You could not see the repair at all from the outside but when I looked closely on the inside, I could tell it had been glued somehow. I think she used a couple drops of TearMender! She did very well on that repair job!

  • Kathy Good
    Kathy Good
    9/23/2009 4:24 PM

    I use Tear Mender to put up the kids drawings on the window....no muss, no fuss! Can also decorate the window....just use food coloring!

  • Kathy
    Kathy
    9/23/2009 4:28 PM

    Gramma Phyllis mends all the boys jeans with this product! What would we do without her or tear mender?

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 4:29 PM

    Sara - Your story is more common than you'd think. To put it in perspective, the Daily Grommet kit would do 150+ of your suede pant repairs! Save time AND money!

  • MARTY
    MARTY
    9/23/2009 4:35 PM

    Jeff, can you use Tearmender to repair small moth holes in wool clothes? Thank you.

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 4:36 PM

    This is great! I think we're up to 23 uses! (#18 decorating pots, #19 comforter seams, #20 belt loop, #21 suede pants, #22 hanging drawings on window, #23 mending jeans) I love the ideas and the energy! Keep them coming!

  • Tanya
    Tanya
    9/23/2009 5:09 PM

    Ha! Train dog ears!! LOL This sounds like a miracle solution. I always wished I had learned to sew as a kid, but now I can just get this TearMender. We have a rip in the cover to our barbeque grill that I will use it on as soon as it arrives.

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 5:10 PM

    I have two good ones! How about all those bindings on area rugs that unravel or come unstitched, and the same for the trims on on lamp shades? #24 and #25. And Marty gets #26 for the wool clothes...conditional on Jeff's response.

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 5:11 PM

    Marty - Tear Mender is ideal for repair wool! Depending on the location of the holes, and what you are looking for in the aesthetics of the repair, you may not need a backing material (patch). If the hole is small you can put a drop of Tear Mender on your finger and just pinch the hole closed. The Tear Mender will bond the fabric together permanently. For a more aesthetic repair, I recommend you repair it inside-out to have the repair on the inside as it will be less visible. If the hole is dime-size or larger, you may want to use a patch or backing material.

  • Ginny
    Ginny
    9/23/2009 5:14 PM

    I volunteer at the Salvation Army clothes dropoff box in our town and we get alot of clothes that have tears and holes. There are a few of us who try to mend them as best we can, but its timing consuming and some of us aren't as young as we used to be! Thank you for telling me about this and for making it affordable.

    (Does this count as one of your numbers?)

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 5:16 PM

    Tanya - you get #27! Tear Mender is weather proof so you won't have to worry about the durability of the grill cover.

    Key piece of info that was covered in the video and I want to reiterate - Tear Mender only sticks to things it can penetrate so it will permanently bond to the fabric material on the inside of your grill cover, but will rub right off (without harming the surface) the non-porous surface on the outside of the grill cover. The same concept applies for leather, vinyl, etc.

  • joanne
    joanne – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 6:23 PM

    One piece of advice. Use Tear Mender sparingly as instructed. A little goes a long way. I used too much on the first project I did and I saturated some fleece through to the other side. On my second attempt I used a piece of paper to create a barrier and less Tear Mender for an invisible - perfect result.

  • Shannon
    Shannon
    9/23/2009 6:25 PM

    #28 - Repairing the vinyl top on our poker table. Somehow my husband and/or one of his buddies managed to put a tear in our vinyl topped poker table. I was able to put Tear Mender on the underneath side of the tear and it sealed it right up. Now if Tear Mender could just solve my problem of my husband hosting his annual Fantasy Football Draft at our house every year!!!

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 8:18 PM

    Ginny--OH man that is so #29. I love the idea of saving your Army of volunteers hours and hours of time. People need your donations deployed as fast as possible, and hopefully we can save some eyesight too. WOW. OK I think I have #30. The steering wheel on our used "grandpa" car has a tear in its cover. Fixed!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/23/2009 8:19 PM

    @Shannon ...hmmm if all the guys went home with fabric hearts glued to the back of their pants, they might think twice about coming back next year!

    #31 - I bet this would work to repair a hole in a favorite pair of socks

    #32 - We can't forget the use in the video of stabilizing a perfectly fashionable hole in a pair of jeans so that it doesn't get bigger.

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/23/2009 8:32 PM

    #33 along the lines of Kathy hanging pictures on the window; hang things (pictures, lists, artwork, etc) on the refrigerator. While Tear Mender is permanent in fabric, it will hold things to non-porous surfaces and wipe off if you want to remove. Ideal for all the new, stainless appliances that don't like magnets.

  • Jeff from WI
    Jeff from WI
    9/23/2009 10:46 PM

    We have been using Tear Mender for about a year and it really works! Great Stuff!

  • David
    David
    9/23/2009 10:46 PM

    # 34 repairing laundered+shrunken fitted sheets that rip near the corners when they're being stretched back onto the mattress.

  • Ann
    Ann
    9/24/2009 8:24 AM

    I use Tear Mender to fix all of my sons jeans & pants. Works like a charm!!!

  • Amy
    Amy
    9/24/2009 9:05 AM

    I use Tear Mender to join skeins of yarn when I'm knitting. You just put a dab on your finger and roll the two ends together. Since Tear Mender is washproof, (and strong you can see in the video) I don't ever have to worry about it coming undone!

  • Kim
    Kim
    9/24/2009 9:22 AM

    Hello!!, I really like your idea about using the tearmender to glue things onto my new stainless steel refrigerator. Would it harm the surface of the stainless steel at all? I miss all my kids drawings hung up there.

    another idea is winter ski glove repairs... they are always getting rips and we used to toss them.

  • JJ
    JJ
    9/24/2009 9:25 AM

    I use tear mender to close the holes I get in the same spot on all my socks. Buys me another year of wear!

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/24/2009 10:18 AM

    Kim - Tear Mender will not harm the surface of the refrigerator. Tear Mender is unique in that it does not contain any harmful chemicals or solvents and therefore will not damage the surface of anything it cannot penetrate (steel, varnished wood, leather, vinyl, etc) and will simply peel off the surface without leaving any residue.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/24/2009 10:29 AM

    #35 @Amy joins skeins of yarn while knitting,

    #36 @Kim repairing ski gloves

    @JJ confirms #31 that this does work on socks and @Ann confirms that it's wonderful for jeans. Thank you!

    #37 I had the pleasure of speaking to Jerry from TearMender and he told me about another interesting use. Those who are required to work out in wet fields/areas spread Tear Mender on the bottom 6-7 inches of their jeans. This stops the water from wicking up the pant leg keeping them drier! That makes me think there's somehow an opportunity to use this with kids winter gloves/clothes as an extra barrier against the wetness of playing in the snow.

  • Shannon
    Shannon
    9/24/2009 11:32 AM

    #38 - @Kathy's suggestion of decorating windows - I don't think we gave that one a number. I tried it last night and found out that you can dip a sponge in Tear Mender then dab it all over a window. I used it on a window in the front of our house and it is still clear but nobody can see in my windows! If you goof up, it peels right off!

    #39 - Scrapbooking! I glue pictures, etc into a scrapbook for my kids. It is much faster than tape and it just takes a little. Once again, if you goof then you can peel it off!

  • Hannah
    Hannah
    9/24/2009 1:03 PM

    I know I'm late to the party, but my husband and I came up with a few potential uses for the bottle I ordered. I hope we won't be fighting over it!

    He makes furniture and he needs it for a few things also.

    Holding chair spindles in place so they don't come loose.

    Using it to secure ceiling and baseboard moldings.

    Joining wood edge-to-edge more securely when making tables.

    Helping to keep hinges on doorframes tight.

    Keeping older glass window panes from rattling.

    Patching torn linoleum or sheet vinyl so the edges don't curl up.

    Holding letter or number stick-ons on house or mailbox more securely without having to make holes in them.

    Securing candles on a dish or holder so they don't tip over.

    Securing labels to canning jars. The ones you buy usually don't stay on for very long.

    Mending (finally, I hope) our dog's favorite toy. She loves her plush soccer ball to death but the seams are no match for her teeth. I've sewn them time after time but the stuffing keeps coming out. I've even bought her replacements but they all wind up the same. I'm hoping that this will solve our biggest problem! lol

    I'm sure we'll think of many more!

  • Drew
    Drew
    9/24/2009 1:53 PM

    I have used this for years! I don't have any idea how to sew. This is my 911 in a bottle! Recent repairs: scuffed top layer of leather on pair of dress shoes. It fixed the underside without hurting the finished (shiny) surface. Dab of glue on my dress shirt button string that came loose. Fallen cuff on 2 pairs of dress pants. Hole in dress pants pocket. Also- took a pair of my son’s jeans that he out grew and made jean shorts out of them. I used Tear Mender along the cut end to keep the jeans from fraying, but keeping the integrity of the cut look. THANK YOU TEAR MENDER!

  • Don Coltman
    Don Coltman
    9/24/2009 4:22 PM

    I have known about TEAR MENDER for over 40 years but never took the time to test it out. About 4 years ago I found the need to mend my mooring cover on my speed boat because of mil-dew spots. TEAR MENDER worked on over 30 of the effected areas which extended the life of my $900.00 mooring cover for an additional 2 plus years.

    I still have 2/3s of the bottle left. Why did I wait 40 years to use it? Don Coltman.

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/24/2009 5:33 PM

    Hannah - Great list of ideas. While Tear Mender is ideal for many of the ideas you share (labels on jars, mending dog toys, etc), I wanted to clarify with some not so familiar with the product, that some of the ideas provide the result you describe but are not structural bonds. For example Tear Mender will take the wiggle out of a dowel, it is not a permanent, structural repairs meaning you can pull the dowel out. This same concept goes for the door hinge, window rattle, and house number idea. Again, great ideas, but not a permanent solution.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/24/2009 11:54 PM

    @Hannah - you can never be late to a party that doesn't end! Thanks for adding # 40 - #49!

    @Drew "911 in a bottle" is great. Thanks for #50-54

    @Don #55 - mending a mooring cover.

    Wow.

  • William
    William
    9/28/2009 5:17 PM

    I gladly join the chorus of praisers but have nonetheless one problem:

    is it possible to get the Bish's latex OUT of a jean's cuff (accidently put the latex on the wrong side of the fabric....100% cotton) or a favorite shirt (half cotton, half polyester--accidently brushed against repair in-progress)?

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/28/2009 7:20 PM

    @William we've alerted Jeff to stop back and let us all know the answer!

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    9/29/2009 8:31 AM

    William - One of the great things of Tear Mender is that it is permanent, and likewise, one of the challenges is that it is permanent! If you do happen to spill some or brush against something, the Tear Mender can be removed while still liquid by saturating the area with water and working the adhesive out of the material. In the event that the Tear Mender has cured, we have learned over the years from a few of our customers that a product named Detachol will soften the cured Tear Mender and allow it to be scraped out. Detachol is an adhesive remover used in the medical industry and is safe for use on most fabrics. We do not have an affiliation with Detachol, but I am happy to recommend it as a remover that has worked for many of our customers in the unfortunate circumstance where Tear Mender gets in the wrong place. I hope that helps and thanks to all for using Bish's Original Tear Mender.

  • william
    william
    10/1/2009 12:56 AM

    Thanks, Jeff, for the Detachol lead. I will check it out. Meanwhile, following the lead in another of the notes in this series, I tried Baby Oil and was amazed to see that within a very few minutes it turns the hardened latex into a substance like melted gum. It's still tricky to remove but it can be done with patience. Then, of course, there's the oil stain to deal with. I blotted it several times with paper towels then mixed Dawn (another miracle product) with other Grease remover solvents and rubbed etc then put in the washer. The shirt came out latex free but with a slight dark stain where it was and a larger fainter halo from the Baby Oil, but it's wearable again and I suspect repeated washings will mute the remnant stains too. Thank you!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    10/1/2009 11:45 AM

    @William - We sincerely appreciate that you stopped back to share your experience with all of us. Thank you!

  • gloria tenore
    gloria tenore
    10/7/2009 9:29 PM

    I have been using tear mender & loving it for years. However the last bottle I purchased, has all dried up. 16 fl. oz. It was tightly covered. Is there anything I can do? Thank You

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    10/7/2009 11:12 PM

    @Gloria if there's anything that can be done, Jeff will know the answer!

  • Jeff
    Jeff – Special Guest
    10/9/2009 7:42 AM

    Gloria - Thank you for your note. Tear Mender is a natural adhesive and does have a shelf life. Typical usable life of our product is 18 months from purchase although some last much longer than that. It sounds from your description, that the product has exceeded its usable life. Once the adhesive begins to solidify, nothing can be added to bring it back to usable form. If you have purchased the product within the last 12 months, you can send us a copy of your receipt and we will replace the product for you. Thanks for using Tear Mender - the only natural, non-toxic, instant fabric adhesive - since 1932.

  • Lyn
    Lyn
    11/20/2009 10:09 AM

    Please help! I spilled the tear mender on my cream colored sofa and don't know how to get out the stain.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/20/2009 11:10 AM

    Lyn, William (above) had a similar situation happen. Please refer to Jeff's response for his advice.

    We hope that you have a successful outcome.

  • nancy
    nancy
    10/9/2010 2:44 PM

    Tear mender arrived promptly but no fabric swatch or small additional container as advertized.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    10/9/2010 5:14 PM

    @nancy - when I ordered mine it came with both of these extra items, thank you for letting us know that yours didn't. We will look into this and contact you directly.

  • c. vogel
    c. vogel
    3/2/2011 7:39 PM

    I still have not received my tear mender and it was ordered at least a month ago. This is the second time I have sent you an email. Please respond.!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    3/3/2011 12:32 AM

    @c. vogel: Thanks for posting. We will look into it and let you know.

  • Tina
    Tina
    4/27/2011 4:08 PM

    I am a girl scout leader and we use this glue to attach all our patches. All the girls in my troop love this project and we passed it on to other troops. It's both permanent and washable.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    4/27/2011 4:17 PM

    @Tina: Great use for the TearMender. Sewing on those patches is a chore!

  • Lori
    Lori
    5/10/2011 12:25 PM

    i was wondering... will it work on leather?? my leather seats in my car has started to tear and saw this and wondered if it would work.

    thanks

    lori

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    5/10/2011 12:40 PM

    @Lori Jones: Yes! Jeff says for a tear in a car seat or other upholstery, insert a patch or other backing fabric into the hole/tear/etc, then apply the Tear Mender into the hole and spread the adhesive with your finger then press the upholstery fabric down onto the backing fabric. If it's leather or other less-breathable fabric, it may take upto 30 minutes to fully dry.

  • R
    R
    9/13/2011 9:18 PM

    I have a thin fabric cotton cardi that apparently got snagged on something and has little puncture holes. Would this do the trick without looking trashy? I love the cardi and I'm looking for an unnoticable fabric repair solution

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/13/2011 11:22 PM

    @R: This will help to stop the holes from getting worse, but it probably won't be able to close the hole up so that it isn't noticeable.

  • Tyf
    Tyf
    10/8/2011 4:12 AM

    This comment section doesn't mention the color: does tearmender have a selection of shades or is it clear?

    To repair a nylon black down shrug (it's dancer), I need a liquid to paint over some minor freying on the sleeves--to prevent holes/tears from developing--and a black color is preferred.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    10/8/2011 9:24 AM

    @Tyf: The liquid is white and it dries clear. However, one of the fabrics it is not recommended for is nylon.

  • Robbie Cornelius
    Robbie Cornelius
    11/1/2011 6:23 PM

    I have a seam rip in the upper back section of a leather jacket,along a vertical back seam. I do not have access to the rip from behind because of the lining. Can I use this product, with a piece of material under the rip to fix it?

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/2/2011 8:20 AM

    @Robbie Cornelius: This might work, but in this case your best solution would be to cut through some of the stitching in the lining so that you can access that rip and stitch it up. Then stitch the lining back up.

  • Malia
    Malia
    11/7/2011 12:15 AM

    My car seat ('leather') seam, vertical, is splitting. Would Tear Mender work? I won't be able to put a patch underneath, so am looking for something to put on the split to stop it.

    Thanks!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/21/2011 3:04 PM

    @Malia: It should help reinforce the weak area where your seam is splitting.

  • deborah
    deborah
    4/11/2012 7:04 PM

    Would it work with that green vinyl-y stuff you cover your outdoor furniture with? And will it hold? It gets very windy up here.

  • Chew-Hoong
    Chew-Hoong – Grommet Team
    4/14/2012 3:29 PM

    @Deb: Tear Mender does repair things made of vinyl. Check this video out to see how to apply the Tear Mender on vinyl materials. It's known to be durable, permanent and long lasting. Thank you for your interest.

  •  Lee Ann
    Lee Ann
    10/6/2012 5:27 PM

    Our pool cover is coming apart at the seams! Any chance we could use Tear Minder to keep it together? The material is a sort of plastic/canvas, I would guess.

  •  Lee Ann
    Lee Ann
    10/6/2012 5:31 PM

    @ Lee Ann sorry, I meant Tear Mender!

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.