Nine 2 Five

Design students are great at questioning convention and exploring new ideas, but too often their most innovative schemes never get any further than the drawing board. A unique program at the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) was created to bring those great ideas to fruition. Called Working Class Studio, the program shepherds the best work of SCAD students, alumni and faculty through design, manufacturing and marketing. A perfect example is this stretchy clock designed by Charles Heydinger, who earned a graduate degree in furniture design this year. Grommet founder Jules Pieri discovered the clocks on a field trip to SCAD and couldn’t resist giving them a tug. They’re made from silicone rubber, so they’re flexible. Charles casts the clock pieces by hand in his plastics studio. His inspiration came from the melting clocks seen in the work of surrealist painter Salvador Dali, Charles says. He chose to highlight three numbers on the clock face — 9, 2, 5 — to play up our conventional workday hours in graphic typeface. You can stretch a 9-inch square clock into different organic shapes, up to 12 inches square, that are held in place with pegs. If you want a new look for a room, simply rearrange the rubber pegs, which conceal a standard drywall screw that you can twist by hand into place on your wall. It’s a clever, fun way to stretch your imagination.

The Charles Collection

Stretchable Silicone Clock

Nine 2 Five

Design students are great at questioning convention and exploring new ideas, but too often their most innovative schemes never get any further than the drawing board. A unique program at the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) was created to bring those great ideas to fruition. Called Working Class Studio, the program shepherds the best work of SCAD students, alumni and faculty through design, manufacturing and marketing. A perfect example is this stretchy clock designed by Charles Heydinger, who earned a graduate degree in furniture design this year. Grommet founder Jules Pieri discovered the clocks on a field trip to SCAD and couldn’t resist giving them a tug. They’re made from silicone rubber, so they’re flexible. Charles casts the clock pieces by hand in his plastics studio. His inspiration came from the melting clocks seen in the work of surrealist painter Salvador Dali, Charles says. He chose to highlight three numbers on the clock face — 9, 2, 5 — to play up our conventional workday hours in graphic typeface. You can stretch a 9-inch square clock into different organic shapes, up to 12 inches square, that are held in place with pegs. If you want a new look for a room, simply rearrange the rubber pegs, which conceal a standard drywall screw that you can twist by hand into place on your wall. It’s a clever, fun way to stretch your imagination.

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Jonathan
    Jonathan

    Thank you for your interest in the Charles Collection Clock, one of the newest products from Working Class Studio. I'm the director of Working Class Studio.

    Designed by furniture design graduate student Charles Heydinger, the clocks are made right here at the Savannah College of Art and Design using a stretchy, rubber-like material called “Dragon Skin,” which can be poured into any shape and dyed any color. (Hence the clocks’ fabulous silhouette and too-cool colorways.)

    We’re very proud of the clocks and very proud of Charles. (Thanks, Chuck!)

    Working Class Studio is a product development venture of the Savannah College of Art and Design that cultivates and promotes the work of talented SCAD student, alumni, and faculty artists. Each academic quarter, students from various programs of study work collaboratively with intern directors to design and create products that are sold in the marketplace.

    An innovative concept for an educational institution, Working Class Studio marries function with fine art to deliver a well-curated, ever-expanding mix of original stationery and home décor lines sold in retail stores across the United States and internationally.

    Please let me know if you have any questions about the clocks or our program. I am here all day.

  • Chuck
    Chuck
    11/12/2009 12:25 PM

    Hello! This is Chuck, the designer of the stretchy clock. I first want to thank Jonathan for his kind words and all of the support from him, Julia, and all at Working Class Studio. And also thanks to the Daily Grommet for their interest in my product. I'll be available for a bit to take any comments and questions if anyone would like. Chuck Heydinger

  • Kate
    Kate
    11/12/2009 12:29 PM

    I loved watching the video, very interesting! Chuck, you have your own lab for making these. Did you choose to work in silicone and then find a college that had a lab, or did you start dabbling in silicone because the college had that available?

  • Desmond
    Desmond
    11/12/2009 12:40 PM

    I LOVE the "9 to 5" bit. (Actually took me a minute -- or 2, I admit!! -- to catch on to the fact that the 'to' in "9 to 5" is represented by the digit '2'. Really cool. I'm thinking we need to start a box of stuff to send our high school senior off to college with and this may be the first thing to go into that box (as a Christmas present, that is!) I'd never heard of SCAD until recently and everything I'm hearing is positive (like this program.)

  • Chuck
    Chuck
    11/12/2009 12:58 PM

    Thanks Kate,

    This was a project that came about while I was going to school here and I'm rather new to product design. My main interest is furniture design where I focus on progressive contemporary design. I don't adhere to any one medium and working with silicone and plastics in general is a recent skill I picked up.

    And thanks to DJP. You're right, these make great gifts and should certainly qualify as unique.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/12/2009 2:20 PM

    @DJP - it took me awhile to catch on to that 9 2 5 connection too - which makes it all the more clever when you do catch it. Chuck - was there an inspiration for that?

    If you didn't have time to watch the video there was an 'I get it' moment for me and that was when Chuck mentioned his inspiration for the clock being the famous droopy clock painting by Dali.



    I really enjoyed seeing your creative environment....is it always so clean!!

    Jonathan, it's great that you so effectively bridge the gap between artists and commerce is this something that is unique to SCAD? I would think that the business part is a very important part of the process and it's good for a designer to get that hands on experience.

  • Jonathan
    Jonathan – Special Guest
    11/12/2009 2:50 PM

    Yes, the business side of our projects is a very important component in our program. It may not be the most thrilling or the most creative aspect of the process -- (sourcing raw materials, calculating warehouse space, and factoring shipping costs sounds like a blast, huh?) -- but it's an essential step in bringing products to the marketplace.

    We make sure that our designers are aware of all that goes into a product after the initial design phase is complete. And it's important to understand that we aren't just designing for the sake of design. Rather, our mission is to help emerging artists pursue viable careers in design by understanding more about how the products they design can come to life ... from start all the way to finish.

    SCAD is the only university around that has a program quite like this.

  • Chuck
    Chuck
    11/12/2009 7:59 PM

    In response to Katherine, I can't take the credit for the 9 2 5 feature. That was an idea presented by the Working Class Studio. The version available today is the third design that happened over a period of a year. It originally began with a more traditional face with the numbers 1-12. I began producing and showing them on a small scale but lacked the marketing capabilities and resources. Late spring is when I began a relationship with Working Class and we agreed on the 9 2 5 scheme. I realized early that there was strong potential to sell them based on comments from friends, and that the design could easily be manufactured by myself with the facilities I have available. SCAD has since worked hard in making this a successful product handling most of the logistics, packaging to promotion and shipping.

  • marc
    marc
    11/13/2009 9:44 AM

    chuck, very cool design, but does the clock really work? (ie, form follows function)

  • Chuck
    Chuck
    11/13/2009 10:07 AM

    To Marc:

    It sure does work. I agree about form and function. In this case, there is no functional difference between my design and a traditional clock other than the material and the novel method of mounting it. The hands are exposed where they might normally be covered, but that just makes it easier to set the time.

    Thanks Marc!

  • Darragh
    Darragh
    11/14/2009 11:24 AM

    Love it -- buying two now for Christmas presents -- thanks for the idea DJP; I have a daughter going off to college too and I think this will be great for her. I guess black and white is probably the best colors since she wont know what the room will be like...

    great grommet Jules!

  • Joja
    Joja
    11/24/2009 4:50 AM

    hi, do you deliver also to Italy?

    thank you for your answer,

    best regards from Italy,

    Joja

  • Sarah Blakeley
    Sarah Blakeley
    12/16/2009 1:53 PM

    Love the clocks Chuck! Your work never ceases to amaze me!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    12/16/2009 2:48 PM

    @Sarah - he's quite a talented guy. Thanks for stopping by!

  • Kathrybn
    Kathrybn
    10/27/2011 7:44 PM

    Love the clock... When it is running, is there an audible "tick?" I'd like to use it in a kid's room, but I need a silent clock.

    Thank you

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    10/28/2011 12:19 AM

    @Kathrybn: There is a faint ticking sound. It is quite soft but we know how sounds can seem magnified when you are lying in bed at night trying to sleep.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

The Charles Collection

Stretchable Silicone Clock

Nine 2 Five

Design students are great at questioning convention and exploring new ideas, but too often their most innovative schemes never get any further than the drawing board. A unique program at the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) was created to bring those great ideas to fruition. Called Working Class Studio, the program shepherds the best work of SCAD students, alumni and faculty through design, manufacturing and marketing. A perfect example is this stretchy clock designed by Charles Heydinger, who earned a graduate degree in furniture design this year.

Grommet founder Jules Pieri discovered the clocks on a field trip to SCAD and couldn’t resist giving them a tug. They’re made from silicone rubber, so they’re flexible. Charles casts the clock pieces by hand in his plastics studio. His inspiration came from the melting clocks seen in the work of surrealist painter Salvador Dali, Charles says. He chose to highlight three numbers on the clock face — 9, 2, 5 — to play up our conventional workday hours in graphic typeface. You can stretch a 9-inch square clock into different organic shapes, up to 12 inches square, that are held in place with pegs. If you want a new look for a room, simply rearrange the rubber pegs, which conceal a standard drywall screw that you can twist by hand into place on your wall. It’s a clever, fun way to stretch your imagination.
Read More Read Less
The Charles Collection Flexible and Stretchable Silicone Clock
No longer available

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Jonathan
    Jonathan

    Thank you for your interest in the Charles Collection Clock, one of the newest products from Working Class Studio. I'm the director of Working Class Studio.

    Designed by furniture design graduate student Charles Heydinger, the clocks are made right here at the Savannah College of Art and Design using a stretchy, rubber-like material called “Dragon Skin,” which can be poured into any shape and dyed any color. (Hence the clocks’ fabulous silhouette and too-cool colorways.)

    We’re very proud of the clocks and very proud of Charles. (Thanks, Chuck!)

    Working Class Studio is a product development venture of the Savannah College of Art and Design that cultivates and promotes the work of talented SCAD student, alumni, and faculty artists. Each academic quarter, students from various programs of study work collaboratively with intern directors to design and create products that are sold in the marketplace.

    An innovative concept for an educational institution, Working Class Studio marries function with fine art to deliver a well-curated, ever-expanding mix of original stationery and home décor lines sold in retail stores across the United States and internationally.

    Please let me know if you have any questions about the clocks or our program. I am here all day.

  • Chuck
    Chuck
    11/12/2009 12:25 PM

    Hello! This is Chuck, the designer of the stretchy clock. I first want to thank Jonathan for his kind words and all of the support from him, Julia, and all at Working Class Studio. And also thanks to the Daily Grommet for their interest in my product. I'll be available for a bit to take any comments and questions if anyone would like. Chuck Heydinger

  • Kate
    Kate
    11/12/2009 12:29 PM

    I loved watching the video, very interesting! Chuck, you have your own lab for making these. Did you choose to work in silicone and then find a college that had a lab, or did you start dabbling in silicone because the college had that available?

  • Desmond
    Desmond
    11/12/2009 12:40 PM

    I LOVE the "9 to 5" bit. (Actually took me a minute -- or 2, I admit!! -- to catch on to the fact that the 'to' in "9 to 5" is represented by the digit '2'. Really cool. I'm thinking we need to start a box of stuff to send our high school senior off to college with and this may be the first thing to go into that box (as a Christmas present, that is!) I'd never heard of SCAD until recently and everything I'm hearing is positive (like this program.)

  • Chuck
    Chuck
    11/12/2009 12:58 PM

    Thanks Kate,

    This was a project that came about while I was going to school here and I'm rather new to product design. My main interest is furniture design where I focus on progressive contemporary design. I don't adhere to any one medium and working with silicone and plastics in general is a recent skill I picked up.

    And thanks to DJP. You're right, these make great gifts and should certainly qualify as unique.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/12/2009 2:20 PM

    @DJP - it took me awhile to catch on to that 9 2 5 connection too - which makes it all the more clever when you do catch it. Chuck - was there an inspiration for that?

    If you didn't have time to watch the video there was an 'I get it' moment for me and that was when Chuck mentioned his inspiration for the clock being the famous droopy clock painting by Dali.



    I really enjoyed seeing your creative environment....is it always so clean!!

    Jonathan, it's great that you so effectively bridge the gap between artists and commerce is this something that is unique to SCAD? I would think that the business part is a very important part of the process and it's good for a designer to get that hands on experience.

  • Jonathan
    Jonathan – Special Guest
    11/12/2009 2:50 PM

    Yes, the business side of our projects is a very important component in our program. It may not be the most thrilling or the most creative aspect of the process -- (sourcing raw materials, calculating warehouse space, and factoring shipping costs sounds like a blast, huh?) -- but it's an essential step in bringing products to the marketplace.

    We make sure that our designers are aware of all that goes into a product after the initial design phase is complete. And it's important to understand that we aren't just designing for the sake of design. Rather, our mission is to help emerging artists pursue viable careers in design by understanding more about how the products they design can come to life ... from start all the way to finish.

    SCAD is the only university around that has a program quite like this.

  • Chuck
    Chuck
    11/12/2009 7:59 PM

    In response to Katherine, I can't take the credit for the 9 2 5 feature. That was an idea presented by the Working Class Studio. The version available today is the third design that happened over a period of a year. It originally began with a more traditional face with the numbers 1-12. I began producing and showing them on a small scale but lacked the marketing capabilities and resources. Late spring is when I began a relationship with Working Class and we agreed on the 9 2 5 scheme. I realized early that there was strong potential to sell them based on comments from friends, and that the design could easily be manufactured by myself with the facilities I have available. SCAD has since worked hard in making this a successful product handling most of the logistics, packaging to promotion and shipping.

  • marc
    marc
    11/13/2009 9:44 AM

    chuck, very cool design, but does the clock really work? (ie, form follows function)

  • Chuck
    Chuck
    11/13/2009 10:07 AM

    To Marc:

    It sure does work. I agree about form and function. In this case, there is no functional difference between my design and a traditional clock other than the material and the novel method of mounting it. The hands are exposed where they might normally be covered, but that just makes it easier to set the time.

    Thanks Marc!

  • Darragh
    Darragh
    11/14/2009 11:24 AM

    Love it -- buying two now for Christmas presents -- thanks for the idea DJP; I have a daughter going off to college too and I think this will be great for her. I guess black and white is probably the best colors since she wont know what the room will be like...

    great grommet Jules!

  • Joja
    Joja
    11/24/2009 4:50 AM

    hi, do you deliver also to Italy?

    thank you for your answer,

    best regards from Italy,

    Joja

  • Sarah Blakeley
    Sarah Blakeley
    12/16/2009 1:53 PM

    Love the clocks Chuck! Your work never ceases to amaze me!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    12/16/2009 2:48 PM

    @Sarah - he's quite a talented guy. Thanks for stopping by!

  • Kathrybn
    Kathrybn
    10/27/2011 7:44 PM

    Love the clock... When it is running, is there an audible "tick?" I'd like to use it in a kid's room, but I need a silent clock.

    Thank you

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    10/28/2011 12:19 AM

    @Kathrybn: There is a faint ticking sound. It is quite soft but we know how sounds can seem magnified when you are lying in bed at night trying to sleep.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.