Six Trillion Stories in One Little Box

What happened to the amateur boxer who couldn’t get down from the roof? Or the neglected sibling who’s being followed by someone? It’s up to you to determine the fate of these conflicted characters in this smart new game called The Storymatic. It’s a bit like Mad Libs but in reverse — you’re given a few key words, then you build a story around those elements. The creator is fiction writing instructor Brian Mooney, whose students encouraged him to turn the classroom teaching tool he created into a parlor game that everybody can enjoy Originally, Brian developed The Storymatic to help participants in a college writing workshop get their creative juices flowing. When the students started bringing the game back to the dorm to play on their own (beverages may have been involved), it was clear Brian was onto something. The game includes 500 cards, which are printed in a classic typewriter font that gives The Storymatic a cool, retro vibe. Gold cards list a character trait or occupation, and white cards list a situation, place or object. You never know what combination you’ll be asked to weave together. Will it be “person with a devastating secret” and “reckless enthusiasm,” or “the one who got away” and “pair of pants that don’t fit right?” The only rules are that you can’t kill your character, and your character must change during the story. The rules keep the game challenging… and will keep you coming back for more creative workouts and inspired storytelling.

The Storymatic

Writing Prompt, Teaching Tool, Parlor Game

Six Trillion Stories in One Little Box

What happened to the amateur boxer who couldn’t get down from the roof? Or the neglected sibling who’s being followed by someone? It’s up to you to determine the fate of these conflicted characters in this smart new game called The Storymatic. It’s a bit like Mad Libs but in reverse — you’re given a few key words, then you build a story around those elements. The creator is fiction writing instructor Brian Mooney, whose students encouraged him to turn the classroom teaching tool he created into a parlor game that everybody can enjoy Originally, Brian developed The Storymatic to help participants in a college writing workshop get their creative juices flowing. When the students started bringing the game back to the dorm to play on their own (beverages may have been involved), it was clear Brian was onto something. The game includes 500 cards, which are printed in a classic typewriter font that gives The Storymatic a cool, retro vibe. Gold cards list a character trait or occupation, and white cards list a situation, place or object. You never know what combination you’ll be asked to weave together. Will it be “person with a devastating secret” and “reckless enthusiasm,” or “the one who got away” and “pair of pants that don’t fit right?” The only rules are that you can’t kill your character, and your character must change during the story. The rules keep the game challenging… and will keep you coming back for more creative workouts and inspired storytelling.

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Brian
    Brian

    I’m Brian, and I created The Storymatic: a writing prompt, a teaching tool, a parlor game, and a toy. It’s great to be part of the Daily Grommet! I’m just sitting here at Storymatic HQ, so drop me a line!

  • Natasha Miller
    Natasha Miller
    2/4/2010 12:14 PM

    Hi Brian!! Great video! I am celebrating my birthday this weekend and will be playing the Storymatic during the festivities!

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/4/2010 12:25 PM

    Happy Birthday Natasha! If you and your friends come up with some good stories, you can call The Storymatic Hotline at 802-451-0050 and leave a 2-3 minute recording. Then we'll send you the mp3 along with a transcript. The transcript is usually really funny because Google Voice only transcribes about 75% of the words correctly. How fun is THAT at a party? A whole lot, that's how much.

  • Shannon
    Shannon
    11/12/2010 6:04 PM

    @Brian: Love that the transcription doesn't come out correctly... My friend and I chat all the time - I use keyboard, he uses that word completion app on his phone. Our conversations end up being quite hysterical and lead us down some wildly creative paths - I can only imagine the transcript would be similar. I love to write and am super excited about your game. May even inspire me to write that novel I've been thinking of! If I do,I'll be sure to mention you in the dedication.

  • Ray Scro
    Ray Scro
    2/4/2010 12:31 PM

    I am going to use the Storymatic cards to compose a new tune. If I call the Storymatic Hotline & play the song, will I receive a mp3 file of my music? Cool!! If you use my music on your website, I will gladly accept royalties!!

  • Valerie
    Valerie
    2/4/2010 12:33 PM

    Hey Brian, I work with an improv group. Is the Storymatic ever used for improv or theatre? Seems like it would be great for that.

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/4/2010 12:39 PM

    Hi Ray! You bet. It'll be just like recording in a world-class recording studio.

    Well, maybe not quite like that.

    There a a bunch of people who use The Storymatic for music, actually. There's one guy who has an ongoing project where he writes a new song every day, and when the inspirational well runs dry, he goes to The Storymatic.

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/4/2010 12:42 PM

    Hey Valerie,

    You betcha! It's excellent for improv.

  • Kate
    Kate
    2/4/2010 1:30 PM

    Wow! Just coming up with 500 cards would have been an exercise in creativity. How long did it take you to build that many?

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/4/2010 1:40 PM

    Hi Kate,

    That's a really good question. I started in 2004 or so and kept adding and subtracting and revising and tinkering. A lot of thought has gone into the cards-- they really aren't just thrown together. Each one is kind of mysterious and evocative, and when you combine them they really do lead you right into a story that's there for the telling.

    Thanks for the question!

  • Kristen
    Kristen
    2/4/2010 2:46 PM

    Hi Brian,

    These would be quite useful for students to devise a better 'dog ate my homework' story or lax employees needing a new excuse to stay home and watch their TiVOed Lost episode. Now that 6 million new excuses have been provided, have you given any thought to the negative effects of this game on our society's productivity as a whole? Just Kidding! I'm so happy this has come to fruition! ~Your cousin.

  • Wendy
    Wendy – Grommet Team
    2/4/2010 3:00 PM

    I can't wait to try this at home. Everyone needs to add some creative thinking to their life. I think it helps your forget about stress and can add to your life with such fun memories. . .

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/4/2010 3:07 PM

    Hi Wendy,

    I totally agree. And no batteries, no wires, no screen...

    Brian

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/4/2010 3:08 PM

    That's six TRILLION excuses, Kristen. That should get you through your workweek...

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    2/4/2010 3:09 PM

    Brian - I think your students are very lucky to have such a fun and innovative teacher! This is fabulous, everyone could benefit by stretching their brain creatively.

  • Paulenne
    Paulenne
    2/4/2010 8:33 PM

    Superb idea - can it be bought in Hong Kong?

  • John V. Tremblay
    John V. Tremblay
    2/4/2010 9:58 PM

    Hi, Brian. I'm a writer, so I love this whole idea. This product has created imagination in a box, and once the cover is off, let the adventures commence. This brings back the "parlor games" of old and just good old fashioned storytelling. No TV. No computer. No radio. No cellphone. Bet this would be fun playing by candlelight to set the mood.

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/5/2010 10:09 AM

    Hi Paulenne,

    Unfortunately, The Storymatic is not available in Hong Kong.

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/5/2010 10:15 AM

    Hi John,

    Exactly! I've heard from a bunch of people that they've taken it on camping trips and it's been perfect around the fire at night.

    One thing that's been interesting about this whole endeavor is finding out the ways people use The Storymatic. From firerings to improv stages, from classrooms to ad agencies, from writers rooms to speech pathologists' offices... it's fascinating!

  • marie
    marie
    2/5/2010 1:30 PM

    What a WONDERFUL "game"! How I wish I'd had this during my teaching days - every high school English Comp. teacher could use the game to great advantage.

    Bravo for another super find, Grommet.

  • L333
    L333
    2/8/2010 12:58 PM

    GREAT game! What state do you ship from? Thanks!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    2/8/2010 2:19 PM

    @L333 - These ship from New York. Agreed - great game!

  • MCDS
    MCDS
    4/20/2010 11:05 AM

    Hi Brian,

    Would your cards be o.k. to use with grade 7 students? No surprise situations?

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    4/20/2010 4:42 PM

    Yes, I believe it's fine. But you know, people are sensitive to different things, and I truly appreciate that. I do a lot of writing with text book publishers, which means that I tend to keep a close eye on state educational standards and grade levels. So I have a pretty good handle on what works and what doesn't, but I also know that my sensibilities can be different from someone else's. And I also appreciate that some content is no problem for one kid while it can be kind of hard for another kid. So I suggest to people who wonder about "surprise situations" that they take a spin through the cards and remove any that they think could be difficult.

    There are no drug references or sexual references. You won't pull a card that says "junkie" or one that says "horny person." You won't pull "serial killer." You might pull "convict," but that can mean all kinds of things.

    So... yes, I would use it with 7th graders. But I would skim through the cards first. Even if I felt I needed to pull out a handful, I'd still have about a zillion stories, and I'd be happy.

  • Kathy
    Kathy
    8/19/2010 10:51 PM

    Brian, I'm especially interested in finding out if you've considered making this product for younger children. Let me explain a little. I have a grandson, age 9, who is slightly autistic. He has Asberger's. He memorizes everything he hears and reads. He is adjusting and improving quite well in his social skills. But finds it a little difficult to tell a story that he's made up on his own. We (his grandparents and parents, and therapists) are working with him to try to get his creative juices going. I was looking at some of the words you had on your cards. There are some words there he would not understand, such as "blizzard". It would need to be explained to him what blizzard you are talking about (as you know there are popular ice cream desserts by that name:). I believe if you continued your product into this area, your sales would grow even more! Your idea is great.......it would definitely make for great fun for older children or adults. I'm kind of looking at this from a little different perspective --- as a teaching tool for young children with special needs such as my grandson. Keep up the good work!! It's fantastic :)

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    8/20/2010 10:35 AM

    Kathy,

    Thanks so much for your note and support. The short answer is Yes, a younger version is very much on our minds.

    The longer answer is that I've heard from many people who use The Storymatic as a therapeutic tool, from a speech pathologist in NY who uses it to draw out kids who simply do not speak, to a psychiatrist in Kansas who uses it as a way to gain insight into a patient's mind, to a high school therapist in L.A. who uses it to establish a level of comfort and creativity for adolescents on the verge of dropping out of school.

    It kind of goes without saying (but I'lll say it anyway) that I love hearing how people use The Storymatic and that it is satisfying to see it used in a way that helps people find language and empowerment through story. That side of The Storymatic is very, very important to me as a teacher and former social worker.

    What I usually suggest to people with younger kids or who work with people in special circumstances is to first take a spin through the box and remove any cards that might be difficult ("taxidermist" is one that young kids often don't understand). It sounds like you're doing that now, and that's great. I think that I'd still suggest doing that even with a younger version... however, that's not to say that we aren't thinking about a younger version, because we are.

    If you'd like, you can email me directly at brian @ thestorymatic . com. That way I can put you on our mailing list and you'll know as soon as a kids' version is available.

    Something your grandson might be interested in is the section of our website called The Featured Artist where we publish people's stories. If your grandson is interested in publishing, by all means send me something. It doesn't even need to be written. It can be a drawing, or a picture... really, it can be anything. We even have a phone number we set up so that people can record stories on the phone: 802-451-0050. The recording lasts a little over two minutes.

    Thanks again for your note.

    Very best,

    Brian

  • Virgina
    Virgina
    12/11/2011 5:39 PM

    On the topic of therapy... As a hypnotherapist who has done work throughout the years in many fields of therapy (beginning with creating curriculum and occupational therapy programs for my own Autistic/Asperger children) this game seems that it will fit well into numerous types of therapy environments with a variety of ages and issues. I have used such approaches myself but always had to come up with the leads and ideas myself (usually on the spot.) This game would open many more doors in the creative and subconscious work I do with behavioral and cognitive therapies. My mind is abuzz with the possibilities.

    Is there licencing or use restrictions for using the game in therapeutic work? Example, if I were to use the game in my hypnosis practice, clients may benefit from use of your game in private sessions as well as group settings. Would there be any fees for using or promoting sessions with use of this game?

    Also, I appreciated seeing the question posted recently about designing a younger person's version of the game in reference to Asperger's Syndrome children. I could see how a simplified version for youth might easily be created, but it would may difficult to to get the topics and subjects designed for specific groups - especially groups like Asperger's Syndrome due to the highly individual needs, level of understanding, and creative communication abilities. For example, my son with Asperger's Syndrome actually has his main fixation in the area of story writing and would find this game easy and exciting - possibly to the point of obsessing a bit on the challenge involved. However others, (with their fixations in other areas) might require different or simplified subject matter so that they might more gently approach and proceed with expanding their comfort zones, fixations, and capabilities without grappling with the more complex subjects and topics.

    Thank you for your time and creative work,

    Virginia

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    12/11/2011 8:56 PM

    @Virgina: It's wonderful that you will be able to use the Storymatic cards in your work setting. I have forwarded your question on to Brian who can let you know if there are any restrictions for doing so.

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    12/12/2011 3:46 PM

    Dear Virgina:

    Thank you so much for your message. It means a lot to me to know that people like you recognize that The Storymatic can help people and "open doors," as you put it --one of the real catalysts for me in making The Storymatic was talking to my father when he was in a nursing home about his lack of mental stimulation. Just yesterday I was talking to a couple of Arts Therapists about how they might use it in their practices, and last week I had a similar discussion with a Music Therapist.

    You bring up a lot of really interesting topics, which are maybe better discussed outside of this forum. Katherine will be sending you my contact information. Feel free to contact me.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

The Storymatic

Writing Prompt, Teaching Tool, Parlor Game

Six Trillion Stories in One Little Box

What happened to the amateur boxer who couldn’t get down from the roof? Or the neglected sibling who’s being followed by someone? It’s up to you to determine the fate of these conflicted characters in this smart new game called The Storymatic. It’s a bit like Mad Libs but in reverse — you’re given a few key words, then you build a story around those elements.

The creator is fiction writing instructor Brian Mooney, whose students encouraged him to turn the classroom teaching tool he created into a parlor game that
everybody can enjoy Originally, Brian developed The Storymatic to help participants in a college writing workshop get their creative juices flowing. When the students started bringing the game back to the dorm to play on their own (beverages may have been involved), it was clear Brian was onto something.

The game includes 500 cards, which are printed in a classic typewriter font that gives The Storymatic a cool, retro vibe. Gold cards list a character trait or occupation, and white cards list a situation, place or object. You never know what combination you’ll be asked to weave together. Will it be “person with a devastating secret” and “reckless enthusiasm,” or “the one who got away” and “pair of pants that don’t fit right?” The only rules are that you can’t kill your character, and your character must change during the story. The rules keep the game challenging… and will keep you coming back for more creative workouts and inspired storytelling.
Read More Read Less
The Storymatic - Writing Prompt, Teaching Tool, Parlor Game
No longer available

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Brian
    Brian

    I’m Brian, and I created The Storymatic: a writing prompt, a teaching tool, a parlor game, and a toy. It’s great to be part of the Daily Grommet! I’m just sitting here at Storymatic HQ, so drop me a line!

  • Natasha Miller
    Natasha Miller
    2/4/2010 12:14 PM

    Hi Brian!! Great video! I am celebrating my birthday this weekend and will be playing the Storymatic during the festivities!

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/4/2010 12:25 PM

    Happy Birthday Natasha! If you and your friends come up with some good stories, you can call The Storymatic Hotline at 802-451-0050 and leave a 2-3 minute recording. Then we'll send you the mp3 along with a transcript. The transcript is usually really funny because Google Voice only transcribes about 75% of the words correctly. How fun is THAT at a party? A whole lot, that's how much.

  • Shannon
    Shannon
    11/12/2010 6:04 PM

    @Brian: Love that the transcription doesn't come out correctly... My friend and I chat all the time - I use keyboard, he uses that word completion app on his phone. Our conversations end up being quite hysterical and lead us down some wildly creative paths - I can only imagine the transcript would be similar. I love to write and am super excited about your game. May even inspire me to write that novel I've been thinking of! If I do,I'll be sure to mention you in the dedication.

  • Ray Scro
    Ray Scro
    2/4/2010 12:31 PM

    I am going to use the Storymatic cards to compose a new tune. If I call the Storymatic Hotline & play the song, will I receive a mp3 file of my music? Cool!! If you use my music on your website, I will gladly accept royalties!!

  • Valerie
    Valerie
    2/4/2010 12:33 PM

    Hey Brian, I work with an improv group. Is the Storymatic ever used for improv or theatre? Seems like it would be great for that.

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/4/2010 12:39 PM

    Hi Ray! You bet. It'll be just like recording in a world-class recording studio.

    Well, maybe not quite like that.

    There a a bunch of people who use The Storymatic for music, actually. There's one guy who has an ongoing project where he writes a new song every day, and when the inspirational well runs dry, he goes to The Storymatic.

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/4/2010 12:42 PM

    Hey Valerie,

    You betcha! It's excellent for improv.

  • Kate
    Kate
    2/4/2010 1:30 PM

    Wow! Just coming up with 500 cards would have been an exercise in creativity. How long did it take you to build that many?

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/4/2010 1:40 PM

    Hi Kate,

    That's a really good question. I started in 2004 or so and kept adding and subtracting and revising and tinkering. A lot of thought has gone into the cards-- they really aren't just thrown together. Each one is kind of mysterious and evocative, and when you combine them they really do lead you right into a story that's there for the telling.

    Thanks for the question!

  • Kristen
    Kristen
    2/4/2010 2:46 PM

    Hi Brian,

    These would be quite useful for students to devise a better 'dog ate my homework' story or lax employees needing a new excuse to stay home and watch their TiVOed Lost episode. Now that 6 million new excuses have been provided, have you given any thought to the negative effects of this game on our society's productivity as a whole? Just Kidding! I'm so happy this has come to fruition! ~Your cousin.

  • Wendy
    Wendy – Grommet Team
    2/4/2010 3:00 PM

    I can't wait to try this at home. Everyone needs to add some creative thinking to their life. I think it helps your forget about stress and can add to your life with such fun memories. . .

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/4/2010 3:07 PM

    Hi Wendy,

    I totally agree. And no batteries, no wires, no screen...

    Brian

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/4/2010 3:08 PM

    That's six TRILLION excuses, Kristen. That should get you through your workweek...

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    2/4/2010 3:09 PM

    Brian - I think your students are very lucky to have such a fun and innovative teacher! This is fabulous, everyone could benefit by stretching their brain creatively.

  • Paulenne
    Paulenne
    2/4/2010 8:33 PM

    Superb idea - can it be bought in Hong Kong?

  • John V. Tremblay
    John V. Tremblay
    2/4/2010 9:58 PM

    Hi, Brian. I'm a writer, so I love this whole idea. This product has created imagination in a box, and once the cover is off, let the adventures commence. This brings back the "parlor games" of old and just good old fashioned storytelling. No TV. No computer. No radio. No cellphone. Bet this would be fun playing by candlelight to set the mood.

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/5/2010 10:09 AM

    Hi Paulenne,

    Unfortunately, The Storymatic is not available in Hong Kong.

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    2/5/2010 10:15 AM

    Hi John,

    Exactly! I've heard from a bunch of people that they've taken it on camping trips and it's been perfect around the fire at night.

    One thing that's been interesting about this whole endeavor is finding out the ways people use The Storymatic. From firerings to improv stages, from classrooms to ad agencies, from writers rooms to speech pathologists' offices... it's fascinating!

  • marie
    marie
    2/5/2010 1:30 PM

    What a WONDERFUL "game"! How I wish I'd had this during my teaching days - every high school English Comp. teacher could use the game to great advantage.

    Bravo for another super find, Grommet.

  • L333
    L333
    2/8/2010 12:58 PM

    GREAT game! What state do you ship from? Thanks!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    2/8/2010 2:19 PM

    @L333 - These ship from New York. Agreed - great game!

  • MCDS
    MCDS
    4/20/2010 11:05 AM

    Hi Brian,

    Would your cards be o.k. to use with grade 7 students? No surprise situations?

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    4/20/2010 4:42 PM

    Yes, I believe it's fine. But you know, people are sensitive to different things, and I truly appreciate that. I do a lot of writing with text book publishers, which means that I tend to keep a close eye on state educational standards and grade levels. So I have a pretty good handle on what works and what doesn't, but I also know that my sensibilities can be different from someone else's. And I also appreciate that some content is no problem for one kid while it can be kind of hard for another kid. So I suggest to people who wonder about "surprise situations" that they take a spin through the cards and remove any that they think could be difficult.

    There are no drug references or sexual references. You won't pull a card that says "junkie" or one that says "horny person." You won't pull "serial killer." You might pull "convict," but that can mean all kinds of things.

    So... yes, I would use it with 7th graders. But I would skim through the cards first. Even if I felt I needed to pull out a handful, I'd still have about a zillion stories, and I'd be happy.

  • Kathy
    Kathy
    8/19/2010 10:51 PM

    Brian, I'm especially interested in finding out if you've considered making this product for younger children. Let me explain a little. I have a grandson, age 9, who is slightly autistic. He has Asberger's. He memorizes everything he hears and reads. He is adjusting and improving quite well in his social skills. But finds it a little difficult to tell a story that he's made up on his own. We (his grandparents and parents, and therapists) are working with him to try to get his creative juices going. I was looking at some of the words you had on your cards. There are some words there he would not understand, such as "blizzard". It would need to be explained to him what blizzard you are talking about (as you know there are popular ice cream desserts by that name:). I believe if you continued your product into this area, your sales would grow even more! Your idea is great.......it would definitely make for great fun for older children or adults. I'm kind of looking at this from a little different perspective --- as a teaching tool for young children with special needs such as my grandson. Keep up the good work!! It's fantastic :)

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    8/20/2010 10:35 AM

    Kathy,

    Thanks so much for your note and support. The short answer is Yes, a younger version is very much on our minds.

    The longer answer is that I've heard from many people who use The Storymatic as a therapeutic tool, from a speech pathologist in NY who uses it to draw out kids who simply do not speak, to a psychiatrist in Kansas who uses it as a way to gain insight into a patient's mind, to a high school therapist in L.A. who uses it to establish a level of comfort and creativity for adolescents on the verge of dropping out of school.

    It kind of goes without saying (but I'lll say it anyway) that I love hearing how people use The Storymatic and that it is satisfying to see it used in a way that helps people find language and empowerment through story. That side of The Storymatic is very, very important to me as a teacher and former social worker.

    What I usually suggest to people with younger kids or who work with people in special circumstances is to first take a spin through the box and remove any cards that might be difficult ("taxidermist" is one that young kids often don't understand). It sounds like you're doing that now, and that's great. I think that I'd still suggest doing that even with a younger version... however, that's not to say that we aren't thinking about a younger version, because we are.

    If you'd like, you can email me directly at brian @ thestorymatic . com. That way I can put you on our mailing list and you'll know as soon as a kids' version is available.

    Something your grandson might be interested in is the section of our website called The Featured Artist where we publish people's stories. If your grandson is interested in publishing, by all means send me something. It doesn't even need to be written. It can be a drawing, or a picture... really, it can be anything. We even have a phone number we set up so that people can record stories on the phone: 802-451-0050. The recording lasts a little over two minutes.

    Thanks again for your note.

    Very best,

    Brian

  • Virgina
    Virgina
    12/11/2011 5:39 PM

    On the topic of therapy... As a hypnotherapist who has done work throughout the years in many fields of therapy (beginning with creating curriculum and occupational therapy programs for my own Autistic/Asperger children) this game seems that it will fit well into numerous types of therapy environments with a variety of ages and issues. I have used such approaches myself but always had to come up with the leads and ideas myself (usually on the spot.) This game would open many more doors in the creative and subconscious work I do with behavioral and cognitive therapies. My mind is abuzz with the possibilities.

    Is there licencing or use restrictions for using the game in therapeutic work? Example, if I were to use the game in my hypnosis practice, clients may benefit from use of your game in private sessions as well as group settings. Would there be any fees for using or promoting sessions with use of this game?

    Also, I appreciated seeing the question posted recently about designing a younger person's version of the game in reference to Asperger's Syndrome children. I could see how a simplified version for youth might easily be created, but it would may difficult to to get the topics and subjects designed for specific groups - especially groups like Asperger's Syndrome due to the highly individual needs, level of understanding, and creative communication abilities. For example, my son with Asperger's Syndrome actually has his main fixation in the area of story writing and would find this game easy and exciting - possibly to the point of obsessing a bit on the challenge involved. However others, (with their fixations in other areas) might require different or simplified subject matter so that they might more gently approach and proceed with expanding their comfort zones, fixations, and capabilities without grappling with the more complex subjects and topics.

    Thank you for your time and creative work,

    Virginia

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    12/11/2011 8:56 PM

    @Virgina: It's wonderful that you will be able to use the Storymatic cards in your work setting. I have forwarded your question on to Brian who can let you know if there are any restrictions for doing so.

  • Brian
    Brian – Special Guest
    12/12/2011 3:46 PM

    Dear Virgina:

    Thank you so much for your message. It means a lot to me to know that people like you recognize that The Storymatic can help people and "open doors," as you put it --one of the real catalysts for me in making The Storymatic was talking to my father when he was in a nursing home about his lack of mental stimulation. Just yesterday I was talking to a couple of Arts Therapists about how they might use it in their practices, and last week I had a similar discussion with a Music Therapist.

    You bring up a lot of really interesting topics, which are maybe better discussed outside of this forum. Katherine will be sending you my contact information. Feel free to contact me.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.