Green Your Greens

Lots of us carry reusable shopping bags to the grocery store or farmer’s market. But then we fill those thoughtful green bags with undesirable plastic that holds our fruit, vegetables, herbs and bulk food items. All those little plastic produce bags sure put a damper on the whole reuse strategy. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Wonder Thunder is solving this particular plastic dilemma with reusable vegetable bags that can be stored in the refrigerator or in your cupboards once you get home. The bags are made from unbleached cotton, have an organic cotton drawstring and come in sets of three: large, medium, and small. The creators are Sasha Barr and Meagan Claire Hall, two Tennessee transplants living in Seattle. A few years ago they started printing pocket-size bags and totes in their hallway to keep busy during a long Seattle winter. Meagan and Sasha still make all their bags by hand — both draw the pictures, then Sasha does the screen prints and Meagan does the sewing – but today they’ve expanded beyond the hallway. Their signature style is whimsical renderings of food, animals and things with faces (they drew frowning toast because it’s funnier then smiling toast, says Sasha.) Their fun graphics make these practical totes an even more enjoyable alternative to those little plastic bags of guilt.

Wonder Thunder

Reusable Produce Bags

Green Your Greens

Lots of us carry reusable shopping bags to the grocery store or farmer’s market. But then we fill those thoughtful green bags with undesirable plastic that holds our fruit, vegetables, herbs and bulk food items. All those little plastic produce bags sure put a damper on the whole reuse strategy. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Wonder Thunder is solving this particular plastic dilemma with reusable vegetable bags that can be stored in the refrigerator or in your cupboards once you get home. The bags are made from unbleached cotton, have an organic cotton drawstring and come in sets of three: large, medium, and small. The creators are Sasha Barr and Meagan Claire Hall, two Tennessee transplants living in Seattle. A few years ago they started printing pocket-size bags and totes in their hallway to keep busy during a long Seattle winter. Meagan and Sasha still make all their bags by hand — both draw the pictures, then Sasha does the screen prints and Meagan does the sewing – but today they’ve expanded beyond the hallway. Their signature style is whimsical renderings of food, animals and things with faces (they drew frowning toast because it’s funnier then smiling toast, says Sasha.) Their fun graphics make these practical totes an even more enjoyable alternative to those little plastic bags of guilt.

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Meagan
    Meagan

    Thanks for stopping in to meet our Reusable Vegetable Bags. Feel free to ask us any questions! We’re more than happy to banter about a variety of subjects such as the dangers of plastic trash, the future of our planetary existence, and the cuteness of our cat.

  • elizabeth
    elizabeth
    2/16/2010 12:13 PM

    I am worried that most big-chain groceries will be unhappy with the use of these bags because they are not see-through and so they will not be able to easily identify the contents for weighing and pricing. Has any been using them regularly at places other than the farmer's markets? (Yes we would all be better off only shopping at the farmer's markets, but in february, that is not often an option!!!)

  • Cathy
    Cathy
    2/16/2010 12:20 PM

    I'd be concerned that these bags would add weight with every purchase - an important consideration when you pay by weight rather than volume. Grocery store produce bags are thin enough that added weight is not a concern.

  • Yvonne Moss
    Yvonne Moss
    2/16/2010 12:34 PM

    I have the same concerns that Meagan and Cathy have. Any thoughts on this?

  • Meagan
    Meagan – Special Guest
    2/16/2010 12:46 PM

    Thanks for your questions! We haven't had any problems at the grocery store with the cashier seeing inside the bag, it's easy to open then to see what's inside! We shop regularly at a locally owned store as well as a Fred Meyer(a large grocery chain here in the northwest) and have had nothing but positive remarks from cashiers! The bags themselves add an incredibly small amount of weight to the scale, so small it's virtually undetectable!

  • Desmond
    Desmond
    2/16/2010 2:16 PM

    Meagan and Sasha, you've convinced me with your answers. I just ordered some. I hate using all the plastic in the produce section! Thanks for inventing this product.

  • Meagan
    Meagan – Special Guest
    2/16/2010 3:29 PM

    Hello! We just wanted to reassure everyone about the weight of the bags. The large bag weighs .75 oz, the medium .45 oz, and the small .25 oz. The smallest bag was so light, it didn't even register on the scale! The largest bag will add less than 1/16 of a pound to the scale. There are also two other things to consider. In our experience, checkout clerks at grocery chains and local stores will deduct the weight of a bag from the scale. Plus in many places, you get 5 cents back for every reusable bag used. Also, we've noticed that many grocery scales aren't very sensitive. Some have a hard time detecting even a small sack of bulk herbs, much less a cotton sack! In short, you won't be paying more with reusable bags, you'll just be saving the ocean from plastic trash! P.S. The smiling veggie faces seem to cheer up even the crankiest of check out clerks!

  • joanne
    joanne – Grommet Team
    2/16/2010 3:29 PM

    Here's the skinny on the weight of the bags. In ounces largest to smallest: .75, .45, .25 oz., and negligible for the smallest size.

  • Jennifer
    Jennifer – Grommet Team
    2/21/2010 6:07 PM

    When I use the bags for bulk foods or produce, my local grocery store happily treats it like a recyclable grocery bag and credits me 10 Cents for using the bags. When I first used the bags I was pleasantly surprised to receive this credit.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

Wonder Thunder

Reusable Produce Bags

Green Your Greens

Lots of us carry reusable shopping bags to the grocery store or farmer’s market. But then we fill those thoughtful green bags with undesirable plastic that holds our fruit, vegetables, herbs and bulk food items. All those little plastic produce bags sure put a damper on the whole reuse strategy.

But it doesn’t have to be that way. Wonder Thunder is solving this particular plastic dilemma with reusable vegetable bags that can be stored in the refrigerator or in your cupboards once you get home. The bags are made
from unbleached cotton, have an organic cotton drawstring and come in sets of three: large, medium, and small.

The creators are Sasha Barr and Meagan Claire Hall, two Tennessee transplants living in Seattle. A few years ago they started printing pocket-size bags and totes in their hallway to keep busy during a long Seattle winter. Meagan and Sasha still make all their bags by hand — both draw the pictures, then Sasha does the screen prints and Meagan does the sewing – but today they’ve expanded beyond the hallway. Their signature style is whimsical renderings of food, animals and things with faces (they drew frowning toast because it’s funnier then smiling toast, says Sasha.) Their fun graphics make these practical totes an even more enjoyable alternative to those little plastic bags of guilt.
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Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Meagan
    Meagan

    Thanks for stopping in to meet our Reusable Vegetable Bags. Feel free to ask us any questions! We’re more than happy to banter about a variety of subjects such as the dangers of plastic trash, the future of our planetary existence, and the cuteness of our cat.

  • elizabeth
    elizabeth
    2/16/2010 12:13 PM

    I am worried that most big-chain groceries will be unhappy with the use of these bags because they are not see-through and so they will not be able to easily identify the contents for weighing and pricing. Has any been using them regularly at places other than the farmer's markets? (Yes we would all be better off only shopping at the farmer's markets, but in february, that is not often an option!!!)

  • Cathy
    Cathy
    2/16/2010 12:20 PM

    I'd be concerned that these bags would add weight with every purchase - an important consideration when you pay by weight rather than volume. Grocery store produce bags are thin enough that added weight is not a concern.

  • Yvonne Moss
    Yvonne Moss
    2/16/2010 12:34 PM

    I have the same concerns that Meagan and Cathy have. Any thoughts on this?

  • Meagan
    Meagan – Special Guest
    2/16/2010 12:46 PM

    Thanks for your questions! We haven't had any problems at the grocery store with the cashier seeing inside the bag, it's easy to open then to see what's inside! We shop regularly at a locally owned store as well as a Fred Meyer(a large grocery chain here in the northwest) and have had nothing but positive remarks from cashiers! The bags themselves add an incredibly small amount of weight to the scale, so small it's virtually undetectable!

  • Desmond
    Desmond
    2/16/2010 2:16 PM

    Meagan and Sasha, you've convinced me with your answers. I just ordered some. I hate using all the plastic in the produce section! Thanks for inventing this product.

  • Meagan
    Meagan – Special Guest
    2/16/2010 3:29 PM

    Hello! We just wanted to reassure everyone about the weight of the bags. The large bag weighs .75 oz, the medium .45 oz, and the small .25 oz. The smallest bag was so light, it didn't even register on the scale! The largest bag will add less than 1/16 of a pound to the scale. There are also two other things to consider. In our experience, checkout clerks at grocery chains and local stores will deduct the weight of a bag from the scale. Plus in many places, you get 5 cents back for every reusable bag used. Also, we've noticed that many grocery scales aren't very sensitive. Some have a hard time detecting even a small sack of bulk herbs, much less a cotton sack! In short, you won't be paying more with reusable bags, you'll just be saving the ocean from plastic trash! P.S. The smiling veggie faces seem to cheer up even the crankiest of check out clerks!

  • joanne
    joanne – Grommet Team
    2/16/2010 3:29 PM

    Here's the skinny on the weight of the bags. In ounces largest to smallest: .75, .45, .25 oz., and negligible for the smallest size.

  • Jennifer
    Jennifer – Grommet Team
    2/21/2010 6:07 PM

    When I use the bags for bulk foods or produce, my local grocery store happily treats it like a recyclable grocery bag and credits me 10 Cents for using the bags. When I first used the bags I was pleasantly surprised to receive this credit.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.