Gardening Without Guesswork

Are you yearning for homegrown fruits and vegetables but don’t have the space? Or afraid that your gardening experiment will end up yielding… nothing? EarthBox® makes it easy to get started with your favorite fruits, veggies, herbs and flowers — this self-contained organic gardening system takes care of everything except choosing which plants to grow. Plus, it uses less water and less fertilizer than a conventional garden. Blake Whisenant, a Florida-based commercial tomato grower, invented the EarthBox out of necessity, when rain and stagnant water from Hurricane Andrew wiped out his farm. He needed a way to protect his crops, and discovered that a portable system that covered his plants not only increased his yield, but also allowed him to move plants in bad weather. The EarthBox system includes fertilizer, an aeration screen, a water reservoir that regulates moisture levels (so you can’t over-water), and a plastic cover that encourages growth while providing protection and discouraging weeds. For home gardeners, the ultimate addition may be its casters, which means that it’s easy to extend the growing season by moving the EarthBox indoors on a cold night, or into a sheltered area when the skies look threatening. (We’re also offering the company’s staking system for growing tomatoes, pole beans and cucumbers, and a replant kit for next season’s crop.) The biggest decision you’ll have to make is whether you like the green or the terracotta EarthBox better. Then just plant your seeds or seedlings, fill the water reservoir, and start looking for recipes that will show off the foods you grew yourself.

EarthBox

Self Contained Garden

Gardening Without Guesswork

Are you yearning for homegrown fruits and vegetables but don’t have the space? Or afraid that your gardening experiment will end up yielding… nothing? EarthBox® makes it easy to get started with your favorite fruits, veggies, herbs and flowers — this self-contained organic gardening system takes care of everything except choosing which plants to grow. Plus, it uses less water and less fertilizer than a conventional garden. Blake Whisenant, a Florida-based commercial tomato grower, invented the EarthBox out of necessity, when rain and stagnant water from Hurricane Andrew wiped out his farm. He needed a way to protect his crops, and discovered that a portable system that covered his plants not only increased his yield, but also allowed him to move plants in bad weather. The EarthBox system includes fertilizer, an aeration screen, a water reservoir that regulates moisture levels (so you can’t over-water), and a plastic cover that encourages growth while providing protection and discouraging weeds. For home gardeners, the ultimate addition may be its casters, which means that it’s easy to extend the growing season by moving the EarthBox indoors on a cold night, or into a sheltered area when the skies look threatening. (We’re also offering the company’s staking system for growing tomatoes, pole beans and cucumbers, and a replant kit for next season’s crop.) The biggest decision you’ll have to make is whether you like the green or the terracotta EarthBox better. Then just plant your seeds or seedlings, fill the water reservoir, and start looking for recipes that will show off the foods you grew yourself.
Made in the USA
Sustainable Living

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Frank
    Frank

    I am thrilled that the EarthBox Gardening System is being featured on the Daily Grommet. The EarthBox container is a great product that makes growing your own vegetables, herbs and flowers fun and easy. Over the past 15 years we’ve made it possible for hundreds of thousands to have productive enjoyable home gardens. You don’t even need a yard; put a few boxes on your deck or patio.

    In addition to great products and customer service we have an equally great history and inventor, Blake Whisenant. If you’d like to ask me questions about EarthBox, Blake or gardening in general, I’m ready and able.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    3/9/2010 12:00 PM

    Frank, we received this wonderful note from one of your fans!

    I understand from the EarthBox people that you plan to feature them on a future Daily Grommet. I am from Florida and have moved, EarthBoxes and all to Kentucky last April. We just set them up in anticipation of the spring and summer growing season. I have had my EarthBoxes for quite a few years. In Florida we enjoyed two growing seasons. I'm anxious to find out what we can expect here. They are a wonderful item. In Florida we did business with one of the inventors himself...a great elderly gentleman with a capital G named Blake Whisenant. He teaches techniques at 10am every Saturday morning and we now have eight of them. I wouldn't part with them for anything. They can be used on a patio, terrace, deck, anywhere you could place a rectangular laundry basket because they are just about that size. You can grow a whole salad on your porch. I can recommend them as a fun, easy and clean way to have a really good experience gardening. - Olivia Walker

  • Nancy
    Nancy
    3/9/2010 12:12 PM

    Frank, last spring a friend told me about Earth Boxes and I purchased 3 boxes. I could not believe the wonderful garden I had - cukes, peppers and lots of tomatoes. I am planning my garden for this year and want to know if you have any tips on how to avoid the tomato horn worms?

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 12:13 PM

    Katherine, thanks for sharing Olivia's comments. One of the great features of our gardening system is its portability. As gardeners we pour a lot of time and effort into our gardens (less if you use EarthBox Gardens) and its nice to know that moving doesn't mean leaving your garden behind. Thanks to Olivia as well. She's spot on about Blake. He's a wonderful man in every sense. If you ever get to the Bradenton FL area stop by and see him.

  • Annabelle
    Annabelle
    3/9/2010 12:16 PM

    I've been using an Earthbox for about 3 years. I love it! It never disappoints me.

  • Gordon
    Gordon
    3/9/2010 12:16 PM

    Have 10 Earthboxes and love them. Okra, corn and herbs all do great. Tomatoes - a different story. Any nursery man will tell you that the problem with tomato dieback is usually "wet feet".

    Over the past 7 years, I have planted tomatoes in the EarthBoxes. They start off great, full of healthy vines and ripening tomatoes. But as soon as they are about ready, the plant dies back. The reason is that the roots have reached the water reservoir in the bottom. They will continue to die off and if you get two or three fruits you are lucky. I drilled drainage holes in one Earthbox and at the appropriate time pulled the corks so to drain the water. From then on I watered them from the top. This worked, but the Earthbox became nothing more than an expensive planter.

    Would be interested if anyone has another solution, or has even had this problem.

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 12:26 PM

    Nancy, great question. One of the easiest and very effective ways of dealing with these dreaded pests is hand picking. They are large and easy to find and there usually aren't a lot of them. Just pick them off the leaves and squish them under your foot. If you're not up for that buy a BT foliar spray. The catepillars will have to eat some of the leaves in order to digest the BT, which is a bacteria, so there's the trade off. No squishing but some leaf damage. As a bacteria, BT is considered a completely safe and natural pest control. Good luck. Just a foot note. It's easier to control pests and disease if you stay ahead of the problem so check early and often. As with any pest and disease control it's best to get into a routine and spray on a regular basis.

  • traci
    traci
    3/9/2010 12:32 PM

    I love my Eartbhox.

    Great video, Frank.

  • Christine
    Christine
    3/9/2010 12:36 PM

    I have one earthbox. I want to plant a combination of plants. Any suggestions on which plants work best together?

  • Brian
    Brian
    3/9/2010 12:40 PM

    I tried the Earth box last year by planting two tomatoe plants. As a comparison I also planted the same type of plants in container pots. My earthbox plants were twice the size with the twice the number of tomatoes. The tomatoes from the earthbox were tastier than the container pots. I am doing two earthboxes this year. The earthbox is great!!

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 12:43 PM

    Hi Gordon, first off thanks for having 10 EarthBox containers. I'm glad you enjoy them and get great results. I must say I'm a little stumped by your tomato problem. The EarthBox containers were designed from the beginning to grow tomatoes and Blake actually has 7 acres (about 14,000 boxes) currently growing tomatoes. It seems to me if the problem is the roots growing into the reservoir then you could cut back slightly on your watering frequency in order to let the water level drop throughout the day and allow the roots to air out a bit. Are you using a watering system that always keeps the reservoir full? As you know the EarthBox has a built in overflow hole to make sure the plants don't get overwatered. We don't recommend drilling additional holes in the box.

    Anyway I'm intrigued by your post so I called Blake directly to get his input. When I hear back from him I'll post another response so check back later. Thanks

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 12:46 PM

    Traci, Thanks for the post. I agree the video is great but i can't take credit. The group at The Daily Grommet did all the heavy lifting with that one. Good luck with your garden this year. Any idea what your going to grow?

  • Al
    Al
    3/9/2010 12:49 PM

    What a great product! Used them in Ohio to grow more tomatoes than my family could possibly eat, and now in Austin, where they help us by being portable, to move out of weather extremes (thunder and windstorms), and by managing water far better than other alternatives (especially with the automatic watering kit). Half of our staff in the office uses Earthboxes successfully to grow veggies, and many were former "brown thumbs".

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 12:59 PM

    Christie, when mixing plants we find it's important to choose plants that are about the same size. The easiest way to make that determination is to refer to the Plant and Fertilizer Placement guide in the instruction sheet. The guide has illustrations of different plant and fertilizer layouts. Under each diagram is a list of plants. Generally if you mix plants from the same diagram you'll be okay. What you want to avoid is planting a tomato plant with a bunch of smaller plants. Eventually the tomato will just take over. I hope that helps.

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 1:01 PM

    Brian, nice post. Do you have any pictures? We love pictures. If your looking for that second box they are available right here from our friends at the Daily Grommet. Enjoy

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 1:03 PM

    Annabelle I seemed to have missed your post earlier. I apologize. Thanks for the kind comments. I love EarthBox too. Some say I'm a little biased.

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 1:16 PM

    Thanks Al. We mentioned the mobility of the boxes before but it's worth mentioning again. Eventually we all have to deal with unfavorable weather conditions. Here in Scranton PA we deal with frost at both ends of the season that can limit yield in a traditional garden. One of the great things about an EarthBox garden is that the casters allow you to easily move your garden to the area with the best conditions at the moment. Which sometimes is inside. I'd like to see you do that with an in-ground garden.

    Also the EarthBox system is so easy to use, no green thumb required. Just follow the instructions and resist the temptation to second guess the system. If you can pour water into the fill tube you can have a garden. You can't even overwater because of the built in overflow hole. Our system provides the plants with the nutrition they need for an entire planting season. No feeding schedule, no guesswork. Thanks for sharing.

  • Gordon
    Gordon
    3/9/2010 1:24 PM

    Thanks Frank Don't get me wrong, the Earthbox is the best thing to hit the market in the garden area in years. And I see and hear of success with the Earthboxes growing tons of tomatoes. But I do exactly what the instructions tell me to do, and yet lose my tomato plants every year. The plants were so healthy last year I took pictures to send to my brother in NC. But three weeks later they were brown. My okra grows to over 6 ft. We had 8 ft. corn. An amazing product.

  • Steve
    Steve
    3/9/2010 1:43 PM

    I can't say enough about the earth boxes. I started when a friend gave me 3 three years ago. I now have thirteen and just made a swap for six more. I sure made out on that deal. Last spring made a bet with two co-workers on who would have the first tomato. Didn't tell them I had a secret weapon - the earth box. Planted tomatoes day after last average frost - ten days later had heavy frost, and 30 days after that had rare heavy killing frost. Just wheeled the earth box into the shed both times. Co- workers hadn't even planted at first frost, lost plants in second one. Two weeks after they replanted I walked in to work with tomatoes. When I asked one co-worker if he wanted to have the contest again just your he just said I'm not even trying this year, you win. When I asked why, he jealously replied - because you have those damn boxes! By the way he is planning on buying some too. A man can not have too many earth boxes!

    Steve

  • Kamillia
    Kamillia
    3/9/2010 1:46 PM

    Love my EarthBox...have never been able to grow anything before. My husband kids me about having a "black" thumb. I've grown herbs (italian flat leaf parsley, cilantro, basil, thyme, chives, and rosemary) and have had beautiful and delicious results. This year, I'm very excited about growing eggplant and tomatoes.

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 1:48 PM

    Gordon, no problem here. I'm sincerely interested in figuring out what's going on. If anyone would know Blake would. One of the things I love about working here is that we continue to learn everyday. More to come.

  • Melissa from Idaho
    Melissa from Idaho
    3/9/2010 1:50 PM

    I love my earthboxes!! Last year was the first year I tried them and I got a little carried away. I am a self taught gardener and do not have a green thumb. I decided to try different things in the earthboxes to see what worked and what did not. I planted cantaloupe, onions, carrots, corn, and 2 kinds of tomatoes. All worked!! My corn never grew this well in the ground! I had so much growth and so much food that it was too much for the space I thought I would use. They took over!!

    I am planning better this year and will probably buy more boxes. They are so easy to use!!

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 1:57 PM

    Steve, I love it. EarthBox saves the day. It seems that producing the first tomato of the season is some kind of national pastime. This isn't the first time I've been told that someone has ridden their EB garden to victory. It's awesome. We need to start a league. May I suggest the name, NFTL, National First Tomato League.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    3/9/2010 2:00 PM

    Thanks everyone for stopping by. Your experience with this product and the questions you are asking helps all of us understand this product better. If I wasn't excited for Spring before, I certainly am now!!

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 2:05 PM

    Kamilla, I'm happy to hear we are helping your black thumb problem. One of my favorite things to plant is a mixed herb box. My wife and I love to cook so having those fresh herbs right in the back yard is great. We usually plant, cilantro, italian parsley, oregano, italian basil (2 plants) and rosemary. I had a rosemary bush last a couple of years even in our harsh weather. We always plant, tomatoes, cucumbers and a box each of sweet and hot peppers. The rest we rotate and try different things. The fingerling white eggplants are great. They have a thinner skin and a more tender flavor. Good luck this year, experiment and have fun.

  • Murnell Olsen
    Murnell Olsen
    3/9/2010 2:25 PM

    We can't wait to get our new (2)Earthboxes growing.We will have four growing this year. My husband will have his own, can't wait to see what comes up

  • Jeanette
    Jeanette
    3/9/2010 2:52 PM

    I started out with three Earthboxes, now have six and am trying to find room for more. I have grown tomatoes, eggplant, lettuce, pole beans with great success. I've had less success with squash but I think that's the gardener not the product. Best of all-no weeding!

  • Susie
    Susie
    3/9/2010 3:12 PM

    I hadn't gardened in years when I bought three Earthboxes. They were great. Now I'm back to a pretty large garden, but use my Earthboxes for hummingbird flowers and spices for my pickles and other veggies. I highly recommend these.

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 3:24 PM

    Hey Gordon, I talked to Blake at the Research Center. He thinks your tomatoes might have a wilt. Since this is a soil borne disease he's recommending rotating your crops or using fresh soil this season. Also give the box a good cleaning. Hope that helps.

  • Karen
    Karen
    3/9/2010 3:30 PM

    Hi! I live in north-central Arizona, and this will be my second year of "Earth Boxing." I have ten of them, divided between an east-facing balcony and a west-facing deck. I grew so many Armenian cucumbers in one of my boxes, we couldn't eat them fast enough, and had to give some away to neighbors!

    The eastern balcony got enough sun to grow peas, greens, and herbs, while the western deck is where I also grew tomatoes, zucchini, beans, okra, peppers, eggplants, and cucumbers. I love that the boxes are pretty much protected on the balcony and deck, and therefore safe from wildlife (though a deer DID reach over my gate to nab some eggplants)!

    This year I'm going to hook up the automatic watering system, since the 100-plus degree temperatures in July required me to fill the western deck boxes at least twice a day, for two or three weeks. Earth Boxes are a great invention -- well thought-out so that they require relatively little time and energy to maintain!

  • Tina
    Tina
    3/9/2010 3:35 PM

    I have 6 of these grow boxes and absolutely love them. After the initial set up you just have to water them and then reap the crop! I tried growing plants in the ground with no success, but get a great crop with the boxes. I have planted tomatoes, soy beans, snow peas, cucumbers, yellow and green squash, peppers. Going to try cabbage and artichokes this year along with my regular crop of tomatoes.

  • Carolyn
    Carolyn
    3/9/2010 4:05 PM

    Last year was my first experience with the EB and WOW,what a treat! I supplied the neighborhood with 2 tomato plants from June until frost. So simple and efficent...The plants grew so fast and were exceedingly healthy. I highly recommend the Earth Box system!

  • Mike
    Mike
    3/9/2010 4:05 PM

    I have had an Earthbox for several years and used it once to grow tomatoes when I first got it. Those two tomatoes produced an incredible amount of tomatoes. I then just used it as planer box for decorative plants. Then last Spring I tried tomatoes again and had a very bad yield, in fact I had no yield at all from two plants. I heard that it may have been due to a tomatoe blight. Now I would like to try again with tomatoes but this time from seeds. What do I need to do to get a good yield like the very first time that I used my Earthbox several years ago? Do I need to get rid of all of the soil that I put in the Earthbox last spring?

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 4:22 PM

    Hi Mike. Last year was very bad year for blight, especially in the mid-west and east coast. Blight can overwinter in your soil usually inside any residual plant matter. So if you think blight might have been the cause of your problem then we recommend replacing your soil and thoroughly cleaning and disinfecting your container. A great resource for all gardeners is the Cooperative Extension Service, i.e. Master Gardeners. Every land grant university has a branch and they can help you identify what disease you might have had. Just and FYI, if you think you have late blight you really should contact your Cooperative Extension. The spores can spread aggressively so they like to keep an eye on it and get the word out. Remember to add fertilizer and dolomite before you replant. Thanks for the great question.

  • Kathy Rangel
    Kathy Rangel
    3/9/2010 9:17 PM

    EarthBox is especially great for those who think they have "black thumbs," or those with little time.

    There is NO guessing about how much to water, nor how much to fertilize, and NO weeding! Last year was my first time to plant a vegetable garden, and two EarthBoxes gave us plenty of tomatoes, snowpeas, squash, tomatillos, peppers, and cucumbers. At the end of the squash season I planted basil and it grew to be a nearly 6 foot tall tree! Who knew? (The basil I planted in a "self-watering container" from the big chain never reached 1 foot tall.) My third EarthBox holds a dwarf lemon tree. All I want for Mother's Day is another EarthBox!

    Be sure you read and follow the instructions—in the Daily Grommet video they keep repeating "potting soil," but it actually calls for potting MIX.

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 10:30 PM

    Kathy, you bring up a great point regarding the growing media. It's important to use a light peat based mix (coconut coir mixes work as well). The media should be composed of peat moss, vermiculite/perlite. In the eastern half of the country mixes with this composition are called potting mix. In the west they are labeled potting soil. Very confusing but true. So definitely check the components in the mix. They should be listed right on the bag. the correct mix will have good wicking capabilities and provide good aeration for the roots.

  • Amy
    Amy
    3/9/2010 10:47 PM

    Jason and I have used EarthBoxes for vegetable gardening for several years. Grew tomatoes side by side w/ those in the ground. EarthBox tomatoes rule!

  • Dee
    Dee
    3/12/2010 8:45 AM

    We've had Earth Boxes for at least 5 years. They're especially good for those plants that like warmth and consistent moisture: tomatoes, sweet & hot peppers, eggplant, etc. And even though most of the pictures in the ads were from warmer climes our Boxes survive being left to overwinter outdoors here in Wisconsin.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    5/25/2010 1:36 PM

    We received these wonderful pictures from a Grommet community member showing her daughter who has loved growing and tending her garden! The first picture is at first planting and the second picture five weeks later shows Spinach on the left and Carrots on the right thriving in their EarthBoxes! Thanks for forwarding Anne!



  • Jesse - Daily Grommet Team
    Jesse - Daily Grommet Team
    7/13/2010 5:47 PM

    I've been meaning to post these photos. I had sugar peas in the blink of an eye and couldn't believe how fast the corn grew. We live in a pretty dense area and it was just the right privacy screen -- the kids loved the whole process too.

  • Nushin
    Nushin
    11/10/2010 1:36 PM

    Hello,

    I live in Colorado where we just has our 1st snow. I have a southern facing window where i would like to place an Earth Box for tomatoes and cucumbers, will I need artificial lighting to get them going and maintained?

    Also what kind of soil would I use for minimum pests? I have grown herbs indoor and always end up with pests in the soil.

    Would you give me contact info. in Bradenton Florida as well?

    Thanks

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/10/2010 6:35 PM

    @Nushin: Thanks for posting, I have sent Frank your questions!

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    11/12/2010 12:56 PM

    @Nushin: I wish there was a simple straight forward answer to your question but there is not. However I think we can help. Growing veggies indoors can be tricky. They will need 10-12 hours of sunlight so you will probably need to supplement with some artificial light. Also be careful of the temperature. Most veggies like the heat and even on a sunny day windows can be drafty places. Generally packaged growing media is pest free. Keep in mind that the starter plants themselves can be the source of pests and disease. The mulch cover should help to keep pests to a minimum. Remember to place a plant saucer under the overflow hole to keep messes to a minimum. Our user forum has threads discussing growing indoors. It could be a good resource for you. You can call the Resource Center at 941-723-2911. Good luck.

  • Nancy Massengale
    Nancy Massengale
    11/15/2010 4:14 PM

    Your gardening system made me wish there were a birdfeeder on the market that is the size of what my father built. It is approximately 5" deep 5' X 5' and is supported by a 2 X 4 piece of lumber. It sits so high he has to climb up a ladder to maintain. I worry about that because of his age. Could there be a birdfeeder of similar dimensions made with caster rollers on the bottom and not as tall so only a small step ladder would be sufficient to reach it? I think this could be done and the birds would feel secure from cat predators. What do you think?

    Sincerely,

    Nancy Massengale

    Stockton, CA

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/15/2010 4:29 PM

    @Nancy Massengale: I think this is how a product idea is born! Maybe it needs to be mounted on a pulley system, similar to a flag pole, so that the feeder can be safely lowered for maintenance!

  • Toni
    Toni
    9/9/2012 10:35 AM

    I have been using EarthBoxes for the three years. I have 6 of them. I have grown, cukes, Tomatoes, peppers (bell, sweet and jalapeno), herbs(basil, cilantro, and mint) this year was my first time growing watermelon. I live in Texas and our summers are crazy hot! What I love about EB is I do not have to worry about plants not getting enough water. Also there is a Earthbox forum online that can answer any questions you might have, you can also see pictures of other users Earthboxes.

  •  walmartie4567
    walmartie4567
    10/22/2012 7:53 PM

    Of what material is the earthbox made? where is the earthbox manufactured?

    thanks

  • Chew-Hoong
    Chew-Hoong – Grommet Team
    10/23/2012 12:00 AM

    @ walmartie4567: Made in USA, the Earthbox is constructed of food-grade plastic #5 and recyclable. You can read more info in the DETAILS tab (below video & photos).

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

EarthBox

Self Contained Garden

Gardening Without Guesswork

Are you yearning for homegrown fruits and vegetables but don’t have the space? Or afraid that your gardening experiment will end up yielding… nothing? EarthBox® makes it easy to get started with your favorite fruits, veggies, herbs and flowers — this self-contained organic gardening system takes care of everything except choosing which plants to grow. Plus, it uses less water and less fertilizer than a conventional garden.

Blake Whisenant, a Florida-based commercial tomato grower, invented the EarthBox out of necessity, when rain and stagnant water from Hurricane Andrew wiped out his farm. He needed a way to protect his crops, and discovered that a portable system that covered his plants not only increased his yield, but also allowed him to move plants in bad weather.

The EarthBox system includes fertilizer, an aeration screen, a water reservoir that regulates moisture levels (so you can’t over-water), and a plastic cover that encourages growth while providing protection and discouraging weeds. For home gardeners, the ultimate addition may be its casters, which means that it’s easy to extend the growing season by moving the EarthBox indoors on a cold night, or into a sheltered area when the skies look threatening. (We’re also offering the company’s staking system for growing tomatoes, pole beans and cucumbers, and a replant kit for next season’s crop.)

The biggest decision you’ll have to make is whether you like the green or the terracotta EarthBox better. Then just plant your seeds or seedlings, fill the water reservoir, and start looking for recipes that will show off the foods you grew yourself.
Read More Read Less
EarthBox Self Contained Garden System
No longer available

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Frank
    Frank

    I am thrilled that the EarthBox Gardening System is being featured on the Daily Grommet. The EarthBox container is a great product that makes growing your own vegetables, herbs and flowers fun and easy. Over the past 15 years we’ve made it possible for hundreds of thousands to have productive enjoyable home gardens. You don’t even need a yard; put a few boxes on your deck or patio.

    In addition to great products and customer service we have an equally great history and inventor, Blake Whisenant. If you’d like to ask me questions about EarthBox, Blake or gardening in general, I’m ready and able.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    3/9/2010 12:00 PM

    Frank, we received this wonderful note from one of your fans!

    I understand from the EarthBox people that you plan to feature them on a future Daily Grommet. I am from Florida and have moved, EarthBoxes and all to Kentucky last April. We just set them up in anticipation of the spring and summer growing season. I have had my EarthBoxes for quite a few years. In Florida we enjoyed two growing seasons. I'm anxious to find out what we can expect here. They are a wonderful item. In Florida we did business with one of the inventors himself...a great elderly gentleman with a capital G named Blake Whisenant. He teaches techniques at 10am every Saturday morning and we now have eight of them. I wouldn't part with them for anything. They can be used on a patio, terrace, deck, anywhere you could place a rectangular laundry basket because they are just about that size. You can grow a whole salad on your porch. I can recommend them as a fun, easy and clean way to have a really good experience gardening. - Olivia Walker

  • Nancy
    Nancy
    3/9/2010 12:12 PM

    Frank, last spring a friend told me about Earth Boxes and I purchased 3 boxes. I could not believe the wonderful garden I had - cukes, peppers and lots of tomatoes. I am planning my garden for this year and want to know if you have any tips on how to avoid the tomato horn worms?

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 12:13 PM

    Katherine, thanks for sharing Olivia's comments. One of the great features of our gardening system is its portability. As gardeners we pour a lot of time and effort into our gardens (less if you use EarthBox Gardens) and its nice to know that moving doesn't mean leaving your garden behind. Thanks to Olivia as well. She's spot on about Blake. He's a wonderful man in every sense. If you ever get to the Bradenton FL area stop by and see him.

  • Annabelle
    Annabelle
    3/9/2010 12:16 PM

    I've been using an Earthbox for about 3 years. I love it! It never disappoints me.

  • Gordon
    Gordon
    3/9/2010 12:16 PM

    Have 10 Earthboxes and love them. Okra, corn and herbs all do great. Tomatoes - a different story. Any nursery man will tell you that the problem with tomato dieback is usually "wet feet".

    Over the past 7 years, I have planted tomatoes in the EarthBoxes. They start off great, full of healthy vines and ripening tomatoes. But as soon as they are about ready, the plant dies back. The reason is that the roots have reached the water reservoir in the bottom. They will continue to die off and if you get two or three fruits you are lucky. I drilled drainage holes in one Earthbox and at the appropriate time pulled the corks so to drain the water. From then on I watered them from the top. This worked, but the Earthbox became nothing more than an expensive planter.

    Would be interested if anyone has another solution, or has even had this problem.

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 12:26 PM

    Nancy, great question. One of the easiest and very effective ways of dealing with these dreaded pests is hand picking. They are large and easy to find and there usually aren't a lot of them. Just pick them off the leaves and squish them under your foot. If you're not up for that buy a BT foliar spray. The catepillars will have to eat some of the leaves in order to digest the BT, which is a bacteria, so there's the trade off. No squishing but some leaf damage. As a bacteria, BT is considered a completely safe and natural pest control. Good luck. Just a foot note. It's easier to control pests and disease if you stay ahead of the problem so check early and often. As with any pest and disease control it's best to get into a routine and spray on a regular basis.

  • traci
    traci
    3/9/2010 12:32 PM

    I love my Eartbhox.

    Great video, Frank.

  • Christine
    Christine
    3/9/2010 12:36 PM

    I have one earthbox. I want to plant a combination of plants. Any suggestions on which plants work best together?

  • Brian
    Brian
    3/9/2010 12:40 PM

    I tried the Earth box last year by planting two tomatoe plants. As a comparison I also planted the same type of plants in container pots. My earthbox plants were twice the size with the twice the number of tomatoes. The tomatoes from the earthbox were tastier than the container pots. I am doing two earthboxes this year. The earthbox is great!!

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 12:43 PM

    Hi Gordon, first off thanks for having 10 EarthBox containers. I'm glad you enjoy them and get great results. I must say I'm a little stumped by your tomato problem. The EarthBox containers were designed from the beginning to grow tomatoes and Blake actually has 7 acres (about 14,000 boxes) currently growing tomatoes. It seems to me if the problem is the roots growing into the reservoir then you could cut back slightly on your watering frequency in order to let the water level drop throughout the day and allow the roots to air out a bit. Are you using a watering system that always keeps the reservoir full? As you know the EarthBox has a built in overflow hole to make sure the plants don't get overwatered. We don't recommend drilling additional holes in the box.

    Anyway I'm intrigued by your post so I called Blake directly to get his input. When I hear back from him I'll post another response so check back later. Thanks

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 12:46 PM

    Traci, Thanks for the post. I agree the video is great but i can't take credit. The group at The Daily Grommet did all the heavy lifting with that one. Good luck with your garden this year. Any idea what your going to grow?

  • Al
    Al
    3/9/2010 12:49 PM

    What a great product! Used them in Ohio to grow more tomatoes than my family could possibly eat, and now in Austin, where they help us by being portable, to move out of weather extremes (thunder and windstorms), and by managing water far better than other alternatives (especially with the automatic watering kit). Half of our staff in the office uses Earthboxes successfully to grow veggies, and many were former "brown thumbs".

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 12:59 PM

    Christie, when mixing plants we find it's important to choose plants that are about the same size. The easiest way to make that determination is to refer to the Plant and Fertilizer Placement guide in the instruction sheet. The guide has illustrations of different plant and fertilizer layouts. Under each diagram is a list of plants. Generally if you mix plants from the same diagram you'll be okay. What you want to avoid is planting a tomato plant with a bunch of smaller plants. Eventually the tomato will just take over. I hope that helps.

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 1:01 PM

    Brian, nice post. Do you have any pictures? We love pictures. If your looking for that second box they are available right here from our friends at the Daily Grommet. Enjoy

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 1:03 PM

    Annabelle I seemed to have missed your post earlier. I apologize. Thanks for the kind comments. I love EarthBox too. Some say I'm a little biased.

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 1:16 PM

    Thanks Al. We mentioned the mobility of the boxes before but it's worth mentioning again. Eventually we all have to deal with unfavorable weather conditions. Here in Scranton PA we deal with frost at both ends of the season that can limit yield in a traditional garden. One of the great things about an EarthBox garden is that the casters allow you to easily move your garden to the area with the best conditions at the moment. Which sometimes is inside. I'd like to see you do that with an in-ground garden.

    Also the EarthBox system is so easy to use, no green thumb required. Just follow the instructions and resist the temptation to second guess the system. If you can pour water into the fill tube you can have a garden. You can't even overwater because of the built in overflow hole. Our system provides the plants with the nutrition they need for an entire planting season. No feeding schedule, no guesswork. Thanks for sharing.

  • Gordon
    Gordon
    3/9/2010 1:24 PM

    Thanks Frank Don't get me wrong, the Earthbox is the best thing to hit the market in the garden area in years. And I see and hear of success with the Earthboxes growing tons of tomatoes. But I do exactly what the instructions tell me to do, and yet lose my tomato plants every year. The plants were so healthy last year I took pictures to send to my brother in NC. But three weeks later they were brown. My okra grows to over 6 ft. We had 8 ft. corn. An amazing product.

  • Steve
    Steve
    3/9/2010 1:43 PM

    I can't say enough about the earth boxes. I started when a friend gave me 3 three years ago. I now have thirteen and just made a swap for six more. I sure made out on that deal. Last spring made a bet with two co-workers on who would have the first tomato. Didn't tell them I had a secret weapon - the earth box. Planted tomatoes day after last average frost - ten days later had heavy frost, and 30 days after that had rare heavy killing frost. Just wheeled the earth box into the shed both times. Co- workers hadn't even planted at first frost, lost plants in second one. Two weeks after they replanted I walked in to work with tomatoes. When I asked one co-worker if he wanted to have the contest again just your he just said I'm not even trying this year, you win. When I asked why, he jealously replied - because you have those damn boxes! By the way he is planning on buying some too. A man can not have too many earth boxes!

    Steve

  • Kamillia
    Kamillia
    3/9/2010 1:46 PM

    Love my EarthBox...have never been able to grow anything before. My husband kids me about having a "black" thumb. I've grown herbs (italian flat leaf parsley, cilantro, basil, thyme, chives, and rosemary) and have had beautiful and delicious results. This year, I'm very excited about growing eggplant and tomatoes.

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 1:48 PM

    Gordon, no problem here. I'm sincerely interested in figuring out what's going on. If anyone would know Blake would. One of the things I love about working here is that we continue to learn everyday. More to come.

  • Melissa from Idaho
    Melissa from Idaho
    3/9/2010 1:50 PM

    I love my earthboxes!! Last year was the first year I tried them and I got a little carried away. I am a self taught gardener and do not have a green thumb. I decided to try different things in the earthboxes to see what worked and what did not. I planted cantaloupe, onions, carrots, corn, and 2 kinds of tomatoes. All worked!! My corn never grew this well in the ground! I had so much growth and so much food that it was too much for the space I thought I would use. They took over!!

    I am planning better this year and will probably buy more boxes. They are so easy to use!!

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 1:57 PM

    Steve, I love it. EarthBox saves the day. It seems that producing the first tomato of the season is some kind of national pastime. This isn't the first time I've been told that someone has ridden their EB garden to victory. It's awesome. We need to start a league. May I suggest the name, NFTL, National First Tomato League.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    3/9/2010 2:00 PM

    Thanks everyone for stopping by. Your experience with this product and the questions you are asking helps all of us understand this product better. If I wasn't excited for Spring before, I certainly am now!!

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 2:05 PM

    Kamilla, I'm happy to hear we are helping your black thumb problem. One of my favorite things to plant is a mixed herb box. My wife and I love to cook so having those fresh herbs right in the back yard is great. We usually plant, cilantro, italian parsley, oregano, italian basil (2 plants) and rosemary. I had a rosemary bush last a couple of years even in our harsh weather. We always plant, tomatoes, cucumbers and a box each of sweet and hot peppers. The rest we rotate and try different things. The fingerling white eggplants are great. They have a thinner skin and a more tender flavor. Good luck this year, experiment and have fun.

  • Murnell Olsen
    Murnell Olsen
    3/9/2010 2:25 PM

    We can't wait to get our new (2)Earthboxes growing.We will have four growing this year. My husband will have his own, can't wait to see what comes up

  • Jeanette
    Jeanette
    3/9/2010 2:52 PM

    I started out with three Earthboxes, now have six and am trying to find room for more. I have grown tomatoes, eggplant, lettuce, pole beans with great success. I've had less success with squash but I think that's the gardener not the product. Best of all-no weeding!

  • Susie
    Susie
    3/9/2010 3:12 PM

    I hadn't gardened in years when I bought three Earthboxes. They were great. Now I'm back to a pretty large garden, but use my Earthboxes for hummingbird flowers and spices for my pickles and other veggies. I highly recommend these.

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 3:24 PM

    Hey Gordon, I talked to Blake at the Research Center. He thinks your tomatoes might have a wilt. Since this is a soil borne disease he's recommending rotating your crops or using fresh soil this season. Also give the box a good cleaning. Hope that helps.

  • Karen
    Karen
    3/9/2010 3:30 PM

    Hi! I live in north-central Arizona, and this will be my second year of "Earth Boxing." I have ten of them, divided between an east-facing balcony and a west-facing deck. I grew so many Armenian cucumbers in one of my boxes, we couldn't eat them fast enough, and had to give some away to neighbors!

    The eastern balcony got enough sun to grow peas, greens, and herbs, while the western deck is where I also grew tomatoes, zucchini, beans, okra, peppers, eggplants, and cucumbers. I love that the boxes are pretty much protected on the balcony and deck, and therefore safe from wildlife (though a deer DID reach over my gate to nab some eggplants)!

    This year I'm going to hook up the automatic watering system, since the 100-plus degree temperatures in July required me to fill the western deck boxes at least twice a day, for two or three weeks. Earth Boxes are a great invention -- well thought-out so that they require relatively little time and energy to maintain!

  • Tina
    Tina
    3/9/2010 3:35 PM

    I have 6 of these grow boxes and absolutely love them. After the initial set up you just have to water them and then reap the crop! I tried growing plants in the ground with no success, but get a great crop with the boxes. I have planted tomatoes, soy beans, snow peas, cucumbers, yellow and green squash, peppers. Going to try cabbage and artichokes this year along with my regular crop of tomatoes.

  • Carolyn
    Carolyn
    3/9/2010 4:05 PM

    Last year was my first experience with the EB and WOW,what a treat! I supplied the neighborhood with 2 tomato plants from June until frost. So simple and efficent...The plants grew so fast and were exceedingly healthy. I highly recommend the Earth Box system!

  • Mike
    Mike
    3/9/2010 4:05 PM

    I have had an Earthbox for several years and used it once to grow tomatoes when I first got it. Those two tomatoes produced an incredible amount of tomatoes. I then just used it as planer box for decorative plants. Then last Spring I tried tomatoes again and had a very bad yield, in fact I had no yield at all from two plants. I heard that it may have been due to a tomatoe blight. Now I would like to try again with tomatoes but this time from seeds. What do I need to do to get a good yield like the very first time that I used my Earthbox several years ago? Do I need to get rid of all of the soil that I put in the Earthbox last spring?

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 4:22 PM

    Hi Mike. Last year was very bad year for blight, especially in the mid-west and east coast. Blight can overwinter in your soil usually inside any residual plant matter. So if you think blight might have been the cause of your problem then we recommend replacing your soil and thoroughly cleaning and disinfecting your container. A great resource for all gardeners is the Cooperative Extension Service, i.e. Master Gardeners. Every land grant university has a branch and they can help you identify what disease you might have had. Just and FYI, if you think you have late blight you really should contact your Cooperative Extension. The spores can spread aggressively so they like to keep an eye on it and get the word out. Remember to add fertilizer and dolomite before you replant. Thanks for the great question.

  • Kathy Rangel
    Kathy Rangel
    3/9/2010 9:17 PM

    EarthBox is especially great for those who think they have "black thumbs," or those with little time.

    There is NO guessing about how much to water, nor how much to fertilize, and NO weeding! Last year was my first time to plant a vegetable garden, and two EarthBoxes gave us plenty of tomatoes, snowpeas, squash, tomatillos, peppers, and cucumbers. At the end of the squash season I planted basil and it grew to be a nearly 6 foot tall tree! Who knew? (The basil I planted in a "self-watering container" from the big chain never reached 1 foot tall.) My third EarthBox holds a dwarf lemon tree. All I want for Mother's Day is another EarthBox!

    Be sure you read and follow the instructions—in the Daily Grommet video they keep repeating "potting soil," but it actually calls for potting MIX.

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    3/9/2010 10:30 PM

    Kathy, you bring up a great point regarding the growing media. It's important to use a light peat based mix (coconut coir mixes work as well). The media should be composed of peat moss, vermiculite/perlite. In the eastern half of the country mixes with this composition are called potting mix. In the west they are labeled potting soil. Very confusing but true. So definitely check the components in the mix. They should be listed right on the bag. the correct mix will have good wicking capabilities and provide good aeration for the roots.

  • Amy
    Amy
    3/9/2010 10:47 PM

    Jason and I have used EarthBoxes for vegetable gardening for several years. Grew tomatoes side by side w/ those in the ground. EarthBox tomatoes rule!

  • Dee
    Dee
    3/12/2010 8:45 AM

    We've had Earth Boxes for at least 5 years. They're especially good for those plants that like warmth and consistent moisture: tomatoes, sweet & hot peppers, eggplant, etc. And even though most of the pictures in the ads were from warmer climes our Boxes survive being left to overwinter outdoors here in Wisconsin.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    5/25/2010 1:36 PM

    We received these wonderful pictures from a Grommet community member showing her daughter who has loved growing and tending her garden! The first picture is at first planting and the second picture five weeks later shows Spinach on the left and Carrots on the right thriving in their EarthBoxes! Thanks for forwarding Anne!



  • Jesse - Daily Grommet Team
    Jesse - Daily Grommet Team
    7/13/2010 5:47 PM

    I've been meaning to post these photos. I had sugar peas in the blink of an eye and couldn't believe how fast the corn grew. We live in a pretty dense area and it was just the right privacy screen -- the kids loved the whole process too.

  • Nushin
    Nushin
    11/10/2010 1:36 PM

    Hello,

    I live in Colorado where we just has our 1st snow. I have a southern facing window where i would like to place an Earth Box for tomatoes and cucumbers, will I need artificial lighting to get them going and maintained?

    Also what kind of soil would I use for minimum pests? I have grown herbs indoor and always end up with pests in the soil.

    Would you give me contact info. in Bradenton Florida as well?

    Thanks

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/10/2010 6:35 PM

    @Nushin: Thanks for posting, I have sent Frank your questions!

  • Frank
    Frank – Special Guest
    11/12/2010 12:56 PM

    @Nushin: I wish there was a simple straight forward answer to your question but there is not. However I think we can help. Growing veggies indoors can be tricky. They will need 10-12 hours of sunlight so you will probably need to supplement with some artificial light. Also be careful of the temperature. Most veggies like the heat and even on a sunny day windows can be drafty places. Generally packaged growing media is pest free. Keep in mind that the starter plants themselves can be the source of pests and disease. The mulch cover should help to keep pests to a minimum. Remember to place a plant saucer under the overflow hole to keep messes to a minimum. Our user forum has threads discussing growing indoors. It could be a good resource for you. You can call the Resource Center at 941-723-2911. Good luck.

  • Nancy Massengale
    Nancy Massengale
    11/15/2010 4:14 PM

    Your gardening system made me wish there were a birdfeeder on the market that is the size of what my father built. It is approximately 5" deep 5' X 5' and is supported by a 2 X 4 piece of lumber. It sits so high he has to climb up a ladder to maintain. I worry about that because of his age. Could there be a birdfeeder of similar dimensions made with caster rollers on the bottom and not as tall so only a small step ladder would be sufficient to reach it? I think this could be done and the birds would feel secure from cat predators. What do you think?

    Sincerely,

    Nancy Massengale

    Stockton, CA

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/15/2010 4:29 PM

    @Nancy Massengale: I think this is how a product idea is born! Maybe it needs to be mounted on a pulley system, similar to a flag pole, so that the feeder can be safely lowered for maintenance!

  • Toni
    Toni
    9/9/2012 10:35 AM

    I have been using EarthBoxes for the three years. I have 6 of them. I have grown, cukes, Tomatoes, peppers (bell, sweet and jalapeno), herbs(basil, cilantro, and mint) this year was my first time growing watermelon. I live in Texas and our summers are crazy hot! What I love about EB is I do not have to worry about plants not getting enough water. Also there is a Earthbox forum online that can answer any questions you might have, you can also see pictures of other users Earthboxes.

  •  walmartie4567
    walmartie4567
    10/22/2012 7:53 PM

    Of what material is the earthbox made? where is the earthbox manufactured?

    thanks

  • Chew-Hoong
    Chew-Hoong – Grommet Team
    10/23/2012 12:00 AM

    @ walmartie4567: Made in USA, the Earthbox is constructed of food-grade plastic #5 and recyclable. You can read more info in the DETAILS tab (below video & photos).

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.