Talking About the Birds and the Bees

It’s a subject most parents dread addressing. Fortunately, author Robie H. Harris boldly goes where parents are often scared to venture. Her books, cleverly illustrated in a child-friendly-yet-anatomically-correct way by illustrator Michael Emberley, are there to help you give your children the answers they crave with a minimum of embarrassment for all concerned. This series includes books for three age levels: It’s Not the Stork is a primer on the differences between girls’ and boys’ bodies, and the basics of how babies are made, for kids four and up. It’s So Amazing offers more detail on how fertilization happens and how pregnancy works for kids seven and up. It’s Perfectly Normal gives children 10 and up straightforward information about sexual health that will ultimately prepare them to make smart decisions in the years that follow. Throughout the books, a curious bird and a squeamish bee add their own running commentary in the margins, often saying the very thing your child (or the child in you!) might be thinking. (For example, in a section on intercourse in It’s Perfectly Normal, the bird says, “All this sounds exciting,” while the bee says, “It sounds gross and messy. I don’t want to hear any more about it.”) Harris’s books have been used as a resource in 25 countries, and have been translated into 21 languages. The frank illustrations have been known to startle a grown up or two (think boy parts and girl parts, and all they can do!), but we promise your kids will appreciate the accuracy. As for the best way to share this information, you can go through the books side-by-side with your kids, or leave them for the older ones to explore on their own. Either way, as Harris would say, is perfectly normal.

Birds & Bees Books

by Robie H. Harris

Talking About the Birds and the Bees

It’s a subject most parents dread addressing. Fortunately, author Robie H. Harris boldly goes where parents are often scared to venture. Her books, cleverly illustrated in a child-friendly-yet-anatomically-correct way by illustrator Michael Emberley, are there to help you give your children the answers they crave with a minimum of embarrassment for all concerned. This series includes books for three age levels: It’s Not the Stork is a primer on the differences between girls’ and boys’ bodies, and the basics of how babies are made, for kids four and up. It’s So Amazing offers more detail on how fertilization happens and how pregnancy works for kids seven and up. It’s Perfectly Normal gives children 10 and up straightforward information about sexual health that will ultimately prepare them to make smart decisions in the years that follow. Throughout the books, a curious bird and a squeamish bee add their own running commentary in the margins, often saying the very thing your child (or the child in you!) might be thinking. (For example, in a section on intercourse in It’s Perfectly Normal, the bird says, “All this sounds exciting,” while the bee says, “It sounds gross and messy. I don’t want to hear any more about it.”) Harris’s books have been used as a resource in 25 countries, and have been translated into 21 languages. The frank illustrations have been known to startle a grown up or two (think boy parts and girl parts, and all they can do!), but we promise your kids will appreciate the accuracy. As for the best way to share this information, you can go through the books side-by-side with your kids, or leave them for the older ones to explore on their own. Either way, as Harris would say, is perfectly normal.

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Robie
    Robie

    Greetings! I am thrilled to have these special books featured on Daily Grommet today, and I'll be watching your comments with great interest.

    I'm here to answer any questions you may have, so please ask away or provide me with your feedback about my books or about talking with your children — be they pre-schoolers, kindergartners, elementary school children as well as pre-teens and teens — about how books can help parents, teachers, librarians, health professionals and clergy deal with talk about the perfectly normal questions and concerns most kids and teens have about growing up, about their bodies, and about sex and sexual health.

  • Jeanette Larson
    Jeanette Larson
    1/12/2009 12:07 PM

    Great to see you, Robie! I use these books in my children's literature class and they are wonderful.

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 12:15 PM

    Great to know that librarians use these books in their literature classes so that more kids and teens will get accurate, up-to-date and healthy information. Thanks for letting us know that whether at one's school library or public library, our libraries are one of the places kids and families can find books on these topics available.

  • Colleen
    Colleen
    1/12/2009 12:16 PM

    We've got a spectrum of interest and ability to understand this topic between my two daughters...any and all help would be much appreciated, so I'm very interested in these books!

  • Marcy
    Marcy
    1/12/2009 12:19 PM

    these books look great. It's so hard to find good books on this subject. Thanks!

  • Christine
    Christine
    1/12/2009 12:20 PM

    When my son pressed us for details, I consulted the book that my parents used with me. It's so 1970's! The mom wears a flower-power dress, and the dad and doctor stand at her head smiling goofy smiles while the baby pops out! I need some updated books to share with my kids.

  • Deborah
    Deborah
    1/12/2009 12:29 PM

    This couldn't have come at a more perfect time. My daughter is 10 almost 11 and they will begin discussing their bodies, changes, menstrual cycle, etc. in a couple of months. It will be very helpful to have this book handy when the subject comes up. Thank you so muchy

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 12:33 PM

    Speaking of updating, each time one of our books on sexuality is reprinted, if necessary, my publisher and I update the book or books, and whenever needed Michael Emberley creates new or additional art. Both Michael and I and our publisher feel strongly that no matter what their age, kids and teens need the most up-to-date and accurate information in order to stay healthy, physically and emotionally.

    And one of the reasons there are three books in our family library is so that kids of all ages can have the book that is age-appropriate and comfortable for them.

  • Katherine
    Katherine
    1/12/2009 12:37 PM

    Robie, I have a soon to be seven year old boy and we haven't done much talking with him. He really hasn't asked any questions that have made us say 'hmm...we need to address this". In the video the first book is for four and up, the second for seven and up. Would you suggest starting with the middle book for him? Should we wait until he seems to be more curious about the subject or should we make a point to bring it up? Another great Grommet find! I love my lunchtime shopping expedition at Daily Grommet!

  • Amanda Fedele
    Amanda Fedele
    1/12/2009 12:43 PM

    These books look amazing. My son was 6 when I got pregnant with my second child. He had so many questions about the process and I wanted to answer them as best as I could in ways that were appropriate and correct for his age. I think its so important to have books like these to help our children learn. What a great series!

  • carla
    carla
    1/12/2009 12:49 PM

    I remember stealthily grabbing a book called "Where Did I Come From," off the family room shelf when I was younger and stealing away to read it in private. It was this great, very 70s book on the birds and the bees. I recently dusted it off in my parents home to share with my kids but it seemed so dated! I am thrilled to learn of Robie's books and very much look forward to putting these on our family shelf so they, too, can quietly grab them and get the right kind of information at the right time.

  • Veronica Garrett
    Veronica Garrett
    1/12/2009 12:51 PM

    Sounds like a great way to teach children without too much embarresment.

  • Kathrine
    Kathrine
    1/12/2009 12:58 PM

    My husband and I are always trying to find the appropriate way to inform our children about their bodies and others bodies in a way that is fitting to their age. It was especially true a year ago when we were trying to explain my sister in law's pregnancy to a four year old and a seven year old!

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 12:59 PM

    What a great question! What about our kids who have not done much talking and have not really asked any questions? Perfectly normal and perfectly reasonable behavior. NOT all our kids ask. So what to do? I would start with the first book, IT'S NOT THE STORK! and read through it yourself. You could then tell your son that you read this and it's a book about all of us and how we began and what makes us a boy or a girl. Then say that you'd love to read it together with him, as you found it really interesting and think he will too. If he says no, then just leave it on the kitchen table, or next to the TV and chances are he will pick it up up himself and browse through it. And if you start to read it to your child, only read a little bit at a time, just enough so that he or she feels comfortable. Follow their lead.

  • sandy
    sandy
    1/12/2009 12:59 PM

    well I may be too open with the kids, so this may help me...if they ask I tell what I feel is appropriate..I don't tell too much but I don't make up stories either...I am not usually embarrassed but would love to have these as a helper

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 1:11 PM

    Sandy, Sounds like you have it just right. But books can help. And Carla, I used WHERE DID I COME FROM with my own family growing up. It is very good and very funny. But today's kids already have a lot of information from their friends, from all of the media, including TV, radio and the internet, and some of it may be incorrect. And in order to stay healthy, they need to have a place where they can find correct and healthy information and that is what Michael Emberley and I wanted to do in these three books. And that is why we consulted with the best experts to make sure what I wrote and what Michael drew was honest and accurate. We both think as most all parents do, that we owe our kids the best information on this topic.

  • Nancy
    Nancy
    1/12/2009 1:18 PM

    As the mom of an 8, 7 and 5 year old, I knew I needed to get prepared for questions about the facts of life and changing bodies. I researched, read book reviews, talked to parents of older kids, and asked our town librarian for suggestions. I settled on Robie's first book "It's Not the Stork" and two other titles. I gave all of them to our oldest as part of her Christmas gifts and she loved being able to read through them on her own and then talk with me afterwards. She got the facts she wanted in a straightforward way and we then talked privately about her questions and comments. It completely eliminated the dread of how and when to handle "the talk".

  • Donna
    Donna
    1/12/2009 1:31 PM

    I adopted a toddler son from Russia so on top of all the questions about where he came from, etc, he is now (at age 6) starting to also question our bodies. He is very aware of appearance differences so I look forward to reading these books to help me along in explaining our bodies.

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 1:40 PM

    Hi Donna: One of the things I was committed to doing when I wrote these books was to make adoption perfectly normal -- because it is perfectly normal and wonderful!-- and to make it just another way children become part of their families. That's why I used the words, taught to me by these people I interviewed: "When a baby or child is born or arrives in a family." That word "arrives" is so important for all kids to know, not just those children who have been adopted.

  • Diane Baum
    Diane Baum
    1/12/2009 1:41 PM

    Wow-it looks like a good and helpful teaching book

  • kathy pease
    kathy pease
    1/12/2009 1:56 PM

    it is hard to have personal talks give me a good ole book to help explain anytime :)

  • Wendy
    Wendy
    1/12/2009 1:59 PM

    I've talked to my 11 yr.-old daughter about a lot of this, but I've been waiting for my 8 yr.-old son to ask, and he isn't asking! These books seem like a great way to bring up the subject with him instead of waiting any longer.

  • Denise
    Denise
    1/12/2009 2:16 PM

    I'm not very good at discussing this subject. I survived with my oldest two now 19 and 17. Now I have three much younger ones and I want to do a better job next time.

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 2:31 PM

    Hi Denise: Lots of us aren't the best at discussing this topic. It's hard to talk about for many, and also to talk with one's own children. That's one of the reason we created these books, to give parents the words and information our kids need to be armed with as they grow up and eventually enter puberty and adolescence. Michael and I have been told many times that older teens, yes even kids 17 and 19 read IT'S PERFECTLY NORMAL because it has so much information that they wonder about and still need.

  • Jeanette Larson
    Jeanette Larson
    1/12/2009 2:55 PM

    I'm enjoying reading the questions and comments. When you write a new book or update an existing one, I know that you do a lot of research to be sure the information is not only accurate but also developmentally appropriate. It's important the the information be accessible. Could you talk a bit about how you validate the information?

  • Jerilynn A. Williams
    Jerilynn A. Williams
    1/12/2009 3:00 PM

    Hello, Robie -

    It is great to know that another group of individuals is learning about your family library. These materials have remained extremely popular with our library users.

    Best always,

    Jeri

  • tina buffler
    tina buffler
    1/12/2009 3:03 PM

    This will be great for my step-grand-daughter who is 15 years old and needs o be educated by reading it for herself. and I hope we win. It will go nicely with everything else she's reading and being told

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 3:17 PM

    Happy to do so, Jeanette. First of all, when I read newspapers, see the news, whether on the Internet or TV, or when I hear what parents have to say and kids as well, I jot down all of this. Then if you note the list of experts at the end of each book, I go back to a smaller group of them, and also to certain individuals, such as what I just did last year when the HPV vaccine was added to IT'S PERFECTLY NORMAL. I went to pediatricians and spoke with them about their recommendations for girls age 9 and up, to make sure that what I was proposing to write or have written is accurate and healthy for the readers of that book. I also check with scientists, and ultimately, I make the decision on what to include in the book, even if some of the experts disagree, which for the most part they don't. And even if an expert asks if I'm sure I want to put something in, if indeed it is information that will keep kids and teens healthy, it always goes in the book. The answer is that I do not rely on one source to help or validate what I have written. Rather, I go to many, many of the best experts on a topic, before I decide what information goes into the books. That's how I validate that what I have written is up-to-date and accurate. Again, kids have a right to have the best and latest information.

  • Robert A. Piacquad
    Robert A. Piacquad
    1/12/2009 3:24 PM

    I hope I win the book.

  • Christina G.
    Christina G.
    1/12/2009 3:32 PM

    These books are wonderful! It's about time someone came up with some options for discussing the birds & the bees. Books like these are sorely needed in our society. Thanks for the giveaway!

  • Lily
    Lily
    1/12/2009 4:01 PM

    I think today’s Grommet is very interesting and useful. Please enter me into the contest. Thanks!

  • Shannon
    Shannon
    1/12/2009 4:08 PM

    I think these look like great book.

  • Liz
    Liz
    1/12/2009 4:19 PM

    I've worked with children for years, and they pour over these books, and appreciate their humor. They get a chance to pour over questions that they've had without embarrassment, and they're getting answers about how to stay healthy without ever feeling that they are being preached to.

  • Katherine Frazier
    Katherine Frazier
    1/12/2009 4:26 PM

    I was always very honest with my child about the birds and the bees. We started by calling the body parts by their proper names and when the time came I just explained that a man and a woman's body fit together and they both contributed in making a baby.

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 4:43 PM

    Hi Liz, I am so glad you appreciate the humor. I came up with the idea of the BIRD and the BEE, because they could be the voices of kids, and their voices could also break up the very serious information that I was writing in the main text. Humor always helps when learning about something so personal as the topics in all three of the books on sexuality. For the younger children, silliness always helps, and for the older kids, it's back to humor. And of course, Michael Emberley also felt the same way, and his humorous art makes these books fun and inviting for kids, and gets them to venture into these books and the topics that are addressed in the books.

  • adrienne gordon
    adrienne gordon
    1/12/2009 4:47 PM

    it is such a touchy subject, glad to get some advice, and humorous at that.

  • susan
    susan
    1/12/2009 6:07 PM

    you did a good job with a subject that most all of us will have to deal with

  • Denise
    Denise
    1/12/2009 6:46 PM

    What a great way for our young children to learn accurately about "the birds and the bees" vs. hearing distorted information from their friends and/or mass media (movies, television, etc).

  • Donna K
    Donna K
    1/12/2009 7:18 PM

    I need a book to help.

  • Timothy Sternberg
    Timothy Sternberg
    1/12/2009 7:23 PM

    I use these books in my class and they are wonderful.

  • Anne
    Anne
    1/12/2009 7:26 PM

    We've had the "It's Amazing" book for a long time (or, as we've recommended to our friends, "you must get that orange book!") At first, we read it with them, but both kids have returned to it again and again on their own over the years. New questions definitely come up as they grow, this book is a wonderful and timeless resource. I have no doubt that that "green" and that "blue" book are just as helpful!

  • Marcia
    Marcia
    1/12/2009 7:30 PM

    Kids need to get the straight scoop on sex and reproduction and yet most parents--myself included--just don't know where to start. These books sound like they could be a Godsend.

  • Jill
    Jill
    1/12/2009 7:33 PM

    Looking forward to reading all three books, even if i don't win the give away!

  • Brigid
    Brigid
    1/12/2009 7:39 PM

    I love the idea of having a set of books that may make this discussion do-able! My daughter is 10 years old and I have not ventured near this topic, but I suppose I will have to have "the talk" soon. Thank you for picking such a helpful grommet!

  • Frances Watson
    Frances Watson
    1/12/2009 7:39 PM

    this would be a great win count me in and thanks for the chance

  • Chrysa
    Chrysa
    1/12/2009 7:51 PM

    These look like a great help to make "the talk" much easier!

  • Lauren
    Lauren
    1/12/2009 8:05 PM

    I would love to have these books available even though my kids are a bit older. Reading a book written for younger kids actually may make them feel more comfortable as they laugh at the "elementary" depictions. And they'll likely learn plenty!!

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 8:19 PM

    Books do help make the talk easier -- and you can share and read these books together with your child. Of course, many children also like to read these books on their own, especially older kids who want some privacy. Still, we can all let them know that while we respect their privacy, we are also there to answer their questions. For those parents who, for whatever reason, can't answer their child's questions, you can always turn to your nurse, or pediatrician or a trusted family member to talk with your child instead of you. All three books can help with the talk, or actually the talks, as most parents report that the talks do not last all that long. Another thing you can talk to your child about when they are reading these books or you are reading them to your child, is your family values. You may agree or perhaps even disagree with some things in the books, and if you do, this is a great time to let your child know that this is what you believe and tell them what your values are, and that others may have different family values than your family. And it's true that often older kids like reading books for younger kids, especially when first reading a book about sexuality.

  • Marcy Strahan
    Marcy Strahan
    1/12/2009 8:35 PM

    The kids are not old enough yet for the Birds & the Bee's but I want to be ready for when they are.

    I love the Grommet! Lot's of helpful info, news & review on books & products.

  • Barbara
    Barbara – Grommet Team
    1/12/2009 9:11 PM

    CONGRATULATIONS to CHRYSA, winner of autographed copies of the three books featured on our site today! THANK YOU, Robie, for these wonderful books. And keep these wonderful comments going! This is fabulous.

  • Sara
    Sara – Grommet Team
    1/12/2009 10:32 PM

    Hi Robie, Its so great to know you. A few years back, a doctor friend of ours suggested that we just buy your books, read them and casually put them in the kids' bookshelf. Just as he said, the books have "disappeared" many times, only to be put back on the shelf with well-worn pages. Thank you for helping us start the conversation!

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    1/12/2009 10:41 PM

    @Marcy I have to tell you it warmed my heart to read your "I love the Grommet." People who produce wonderful creations, like Robie, deserve a forum like this. I love that you, and everyone else, took the chance to chat with Robie.

  • Vicki
    Vicki
    1/13/2009 7:40 AM

    I had a book that was similar when I was a kid (I still remember it saying 'penis, it sounds like peanuts without the "t"'). Genius.

  • Susan Goodman
    Susan Goodman
    1/13/2009 8:01 AM

    I had It's Perfectly Normal for my son years ago, and give it or its younger equivalents at baby showers along with Goodnight Moon or Pat the Bunny. What I like about them is not only do they not shy away from what could be "harder" information, they deal with everything so directly and confidently that kids can take it in the same way.

  • Kathy
    Kathy
    1/13/2009 8:08 AM

    These books look great! A nice teaching tool for my kids. I look forward to reading them!

  • jessica ruppert
    jessica ruppert
    1/13/2009 8:08 AM

    This is a great testimonial about the books all parents need at some point! It is hard to know when the big "questions" will start and it is nice to learn about a series of books that provide great insight at any age. I am off the the book store today! Thanks for the great tip.

  • Swistle
    Swistle
    1/13/2009 8:27 AM

    Oo oo, enter me! We've gotten one of these books out of the library and LOVED it, and I would LOVE to own a set. I have five kids, and that's a lot of blushy explaining to do.

  • Swistle
    Swistle
    1/13/2009 8:30 AM

    Oh, shoot, it's the 13th today, isn't it? I hadn't changed my desk calendar yet and thought it was the 12th! Well, anyway, love the books. They're exactly what I'm looking for, and I think I'll go ahead and buy a set. Not as happy as autographed, but great books!

  • Barbara
    Barbara – Grommet Team
    1/13/2009 9:16 AM

    Swistle, sorry you missed the promotion! :) So glad you like the books, and as one of five children myself, I think we could've used a set of these around! I can assure you that the info I received (as the youngest of the crew) was hardly based on the facts. Hope these make all that blushy explaining easier for you!

  • Kate
    Kate
    1/13/2009 9:23 AM

    Just starting to think about how to approach this with my five year old. These books look like a good start.

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    1/13/2009 9:27 AM

    @jessica ruppert Jessica...glad you like this idea. Did you know you can buy the books right from our site? Just hit the "get it now" button. Today we are sending you to Amazon to finish the purchase. The majority of days, though, we ship the Grommets ourselves. I can understand if you'd like to take a field trip to the bookstore, but just want you to know you can do this from home if you prefer.

  • Dustin
    Dustin
    1/13/2009 9:50 AM

    I love the site. You guys give some many fun and wonderful ideas.

  • Pat
    Pat
    1/13/2009 9:55 AM

    I wish these books has been available when my children were young. I so admire your clear, kind, accessible, and comprehensive approach to the subjects of sexuality, masturbation, and fertility. Thanks, Robie, for a true and important service to both children and adults..

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/13/2009 10:42 AM

    Thanks, Pat and thank you to everyone who posted in the last 24 hours, for your comments. Now when I get stuck while writing the nonfiction books I am working on now, I will know that out there there are parents and families who do want to read books on those topics that are hard to deal with and talk about and think about, and yet, we all know that those are the kind of things we really do have to talk to our kids at all ages about, so that they realize that they are not alone in their thoughts, and concerns. As authors, we tend to work mostly alone, so knowing that all of your are out there and that the books we create can be helpful and yes, even fun, certainly keeps me and all of us who are writers working to make the best books we can for kids. After all, that is who we are writing for, THE KIDS. The times we live in are complicated, not only for us, but for our kids as well, even our young children, and if a book can help a child or a family, that's a good and lucky thing. Speaking of lucky, luckily, there are so many amazing children book authors and illustrators who are creating new books as we speak, so do check them all out. And thanks to everyone at the Daily Grommet for all you do for children and families. You are all as awesome as your site is!

  • joanne
    joanne – Grommet Team
    1/13/2009 11:49 AM

    Thank you....Robie Harris for spending the day with us. It's been so special for us all to hear you respond to questions with the insight, warmth and honesty that we witness in your books.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

Birds & Bees Books

by Robie H. Harris

Talking About the Birds and the Bees

It’s a subject most parents dread addressing. Fortunately, author Robie H. Harris boldly goes where parents are often scared to venture. Her books, cleverly illustrated in a child-friendly-yet-anatomically-correct way by illustrator Michael Emberley, are there to help you give your children the answers they crave with a minimum of embarrassment for all concerned.

This series includes books for three age levels: It’s Not the Stork is a primer on the differences between girls’ and boys’ bodies, and the basics of how
babies are made, for kids four and up. It’s So Amazing offers more detail on how fertilization happens and how pregnancy works for kids seven and up. It’s Perfectly Normal gives children 10 and up straightforward information about sexual health that will ultimately prepare them to make smart decisions in the years that follow.

Throughout the books, a curious bird and a squeamish bee add their own running commentary in the margins, often saying the very thing your child (or the child in you!) might be thinking. (For example, in a section on intercourse in It’s Perfectly Normal, the bird says, “All this sounds exciting,” while the bee says, “It sounds gross and messy. I don’t want to hear any more about it.”)

Harris’s books have been used as a resource in 25 countries, and have been translated into 21 languages. The frank illustrations have been known to startle a grown up or two (think boy parts and girl parts, and all they can do!), but we promise your kids will appreciate the accuracy.

As for the best way to share this information, you can go through the books side-by-side with your kids, or leave them for the older ones to explore on their own. Either way, as Harris would say, is perfectly normal.
Read More Read Less
Birds and Bees Books
No longer available

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Robie
    Robie

    Greetings! I am thrilled to have these special books featured on Daily Grommet today, and I'll be watching your comments with great interest.

    I'm here to answer any questions you may have, so please ask away or provide me with your feedback about my books or about talking with your children — be they pre-schoolers, kindergartners, elementary school children as well as pre-teens and teens — about how books can help parents, teachers, librarians, health professionals and clergy deal with talk about the perfectly normal questions and concerns most kids and teens have about growing up, about their bodies, and about sex and sexual health.

  • Jeanette Larson
    Jeanette Larson
    1/12/2009 12:07 PM

    Great to see you, Robie! I use these books in my children's literature class and they are wonderful.

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 12:15 PM

    Great to know that librarians use these books in their literature classes so that more kids and teens will get accurate, up-to-date and healthy information. Thanks for letting us know that whether at one's school library or public library, our libraries are one of the places kids and families can find books on these topics available.

  • Colleen
    Colleen
    1/12/2009 12:16 PM

    We've got a spectrum of interest and ability to understand this topic between my two daughters...any and all help would be much appreciated, so I'm very interested in these books!

  • Marcy
    Marcy
    1/12/2009 12:19 PM

    these books look great. It's so hard to find good books on this subject. Thanks!

  • Christine
    Christine
    1/12/2009 12:20 PM

    When my son pressed us for details, I consulted the book that my parents used with me. It's so 1970's! The mom wears a flower-power dress, and the dad and doctor stand at her head smiling goofy smiles while the baby pops out! I need some updated books to share with my kids.

  • Deborah
    Deborah
    1/12/2009 12:29 PM

    This couldn't have come at a more perfect time. My daughter is 10 almost 11 and they will begin discussing their bodies, changes, menstrual cycle, etc. in a couple of months. It will be very helpful to have this book handy when the subject comes up. Thank you so muchy

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 12:33 PM

    Speaking of updating, each time one of our books on sexuality is reprinted, if necessary, my publisher and I update the book or books, and whenever needed Michael Emberley creates new or additional art. Both Michael and I and our publisher feel strongly that no matter what their age, kids and teens need the most up-to-date and accurate information in order to stay healthy, physically and emotionally.

    And one of the reasons there are three books in our family library is so that kids of all ages can have the book that is age-appropriate and comfortable for them.

  • Katherine
    Katherine
    1/12/2009 12:37 PM

    Robie, I have a soon to be seven year old boy and we haven't done much talking with him. He really hasn't asked any questions that have made us say 'hmm...we need to address this". In the video the first book is for four and up, the second for seven and up. Would you suggest starting with the middle book for him? Should we wait until he seems to be more curious about the subject or should we make a point to bring it up? Another great Grommet find! I love my lunchtime shopping expedition at Daily Grommet!

  • Amanda Fedele
    Amanda Fedele
    1/12/2009 12:43 PM

    These books look amazing. My son was 6 when I got pregnant with my second child. He had so many questions about the process and I wanted to answer them as best as I could in ways that were appropriate and correct for his age. I think its so important to have books like these to help our children learn. What a great series!

  • carla
    carla
    1/12/2009 12:49 PM

    I remember stealthily grabbing a book called "Where Did I Come From," off the family room shelf when I was younger and stealing away to read it in private. It was this great, very 70s book on the birds and the bees. I recently dusted it off in my parents home to share with my kids but it seemed so dated! I am thrilled to learn of Robie's books and very much look forward to putting these on our family shelf so they, too, can quietly grab them and get the right kind of information at the right time.

  • Veronica Garrett
    Veronica Garrett
    1/12/2009 12:51 PM

    Sounds like a great way to teach children without too much embarresment.

  • Kathrine
    Kathrine
    1/12/2009 12:58 PM

    My husband and I are always trying to find the appropriate way to inform our children about their bodies and others bodies in a way that is fitting to their age. It was especially true a year ago when we were trying to explain my sister in law's pregnancy to a four year old and a seven year old!

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 12:59 PM

    What a great question! What about our kids who have not done much talking and have not really asked any questions? Perfectly normal and perfectly reasonable behavior. NOT all our kids ask. So what to do? I would start with the first book, IT'S NOT THE STORK! and read through it yourself. You could then tell your son that you read this and it's a book about all of us and how we began and what makes us a boy or a girl. Then say that you'd love to read it together with him, as you found it really interesting and think he will too. If he says no, then just leave it on the kitchen table, or next to the TV and chances are he will pick it up up himself and browse through it. And if you start to read it to your child, only read a little bit at a time, just enough so that he or she feels comfortable. Follow their lead.

  • sandy
    sandy
    1/12/2009 12:59 PM

    well I may be too open with the kids, so this may help me...if they ask I tell what I feel is appropriate..I don't tell too much but I don't make up stories either...I am not usually embarrassed but would love to have these as a helper

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 1:11 PM

    Sandy, Sounds like you have it just right. But books can help. And Carla, I used WHERE DID I COME FROM with my own family growing up. It is very good and very funny. But today's kids already have a lot of information from their friends, from all of the media, including TV, radio and the internet, and some of it may be incorrect. And in order to stay healthy, they need to have a place where they can find correct and healthy information and that is what Michael Emberley and I wanted to do in these three books. And that is why we consulted with the best experts to make sure what I wrote and what Michael drew was honest and accurate. We both think as most all parents do, that we owe our kids the best information on this topic.

  • Nancy
    Nancy
    1/12/2009 1:18 PM

    As the mom of an 8, 7 and 5 year old, I knew I needed to get prepared for questions about the facts of life and changing bodies. I researched, read book reviews, talked to parents of older kids, and asked our town librarian for suggestions. I settled on Robie's first book "It's Not the Stork" and two other titles. I gave all of them to our oldest as part of her Christmas gifts and she loved being able to read through them on her own and then talk with me afterwards. She got the facts she wanted in a straightforward way and we then talked privately about her questions and comments. It completely eliminated the dread of how and when to handle "the talk".

  • Donna
    Donna
    1/12/2009 1:31 PM

    I adopted a toddler son from Russia so on top of all the questions about where he came from, etc, he is now (at age 6) starting to also question our bodies. He is very aware of appearance differences so I look forward to reading these books to help me along in explaining our bodies.

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 1:40 PM

    Hi Donna: One of the things I was committed to doing when I wrote these books was to make adoption perfectly normal -- because it is perfectly normal and wonderful!-- and to make it just another way children become part of their families. That's why I used the words, taught to me by these people I interviewed: "When a baby or child is born or arrives in a family." That word "arrives" is so important for all kids to know, not just those children who have been adopted.

  • Diane Baum
    Diane Baum
    1/12/2009 1:41 PM

    Wow-it looks like a good and helpful teaching book

  • kathy pease
    kathy pease
    1/12/2009 1:56 PM

    it is hard to have personal talks give me a good ole book to help explain anytime :)

  • Wendy
    Wendy
    1/12/2009 1:59 PM

    I've talked to my 11 yr.-old daughter about a lot of this, but I've been waiting for my 8 yr.-old son to ask, and he isn't asking! These books seem like a great way to bring up the subject with him instead of waiting any longer.

  • Denise
    Denise
    1/12/2009 2:16 PM

    I'm not very good at discussing this subject. I survived with my oldest two now 19 and 17. Now I have three much younger ones and I want to do a better job next time.

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 2:31 PM

    Hi Denise: Lots of us aren't the best at discussing this topic. It's hard to talk about for many, and also to talk with one's own children. That's one of the reason we created these books, to give parents the words and information our kids need to be armed with as they grow up and eventually enter puberty and adolescence. Michael and I have been told many times that older teens, yes even kids 17 and 19 read IT'S PERFECTLY NORMAL because it has so much information that they wonder about and still need.

  • Jeanette Larson
    Jeanette Larson
    1/12/2009 2:55 PM

    I'm enjoying reading the questions and comments. When you write a new book or update an existing one, I know that you do a lot of research to be sure the information is not only accurate but also developmentally appropriate. It's important the the information be accessible. Could you talk a bit about how you validate the information?

  • Jerilynn A. Williams
    Jerilynn A. Williams
    1/12/2009 3:00 PM

    Hello, Robie -

    It is great to know that another group of individuals is learning about your family library. These materials have remained extremely popular with our library users.

    Best always,

    Jeri

  • tina buffler
    tina buffler
    1/12/2009 3:03 PM

    This will be great for my step-grand-daughter who is 15 years old and needs o be educated by reading it for herself. and I hope we win. It will go nicely with everything else she's reading and being told

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 3:17 PM

    Happy to do so, Jeanette. First of all, when I read newspapers, see the news, whether on the Internet or TV, or when I hear what parents have to say and kids as well, I jot down all of this. Then if you note the list of experts at the end of each book, I go back to a smaller group of them, and also to certain individuals, such as what I just did last year when the HPV vaccine was added to IT'S PERFECTLY NORMAL. I went to pediatricians and spoke with them about their recommendations for girls age 9 and up, to make sure that what I was proposing to write or have written is accurate and healthy for the readers of that book. I also check with scientists, and ultimately, I make the decision on what to include in the book, even if some of the experts disagree, which for the most part they don't. And even if an expert asks if I'm sure I want to put something in, if indeed it is information that will keep kids and teens healthy, it always goes in the book. The answer is that I do not rely on one source to help or validate what I have written. Rather, I go to many, many of the best experts on a topic, before I decide what information goes into the books. That's how I validate that what I have written is up-to-date and accurate. Again, kids have a right to have the best and latest information.

  • Robert A. Piacquad
    Robert A. Piacquad
    1/12/2009 3:24 PM

    I hope I win the book.

  • Christina G.
    Christina G.
    1/12/2009 3:32 PM

    These books are wonderful! It's about time someone came up with some options for discussing the birds & the bees. Books like these are sorely needed in our society. Thanks for the giveaway!

  • Lily
    Lily
    1/12/2009 4:01 PM

    I think today’s Grommet is very interesting and useful. Please enter me into the contest. Thanks!

  • Shannon
    Shannon
    1/12/2009 4:08 PM

    I think these look like great book.

  • Liz
    Liz
    1/12/2009 4:19 PM

    I've worked with children for years, and they pour over these books, and appreciate their humor. They get a chance to pour over questions that they've had without embarrassment, and they're getting answers about how to stay healthy without ever feeling that they are being preached to.

  • Katherine Frazier
    Katherine Frazier
    1/12/2009 4:26 PM

    I was always very honest with my child about the birds and the bees. We started by calling the body parts by their proper names and when the time came I just explained that a man and a woman's body fit together and they both contributed in making a baby.

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 4:43 PM

    Hi Liz, I am so glad you appreciate the humor. I came up with the idea of the BIRD and the BEE, because they could be the voices of kids, and their voices could also break up the very serious information that I was writing in the main text. Humor always helps when learning about something so personal as the topics in all three of the books on sexuality. For the younger children, silliness always helps, and for the older kids, it's back to humor. And of course, Michael Emberley also felt the same way, and his humorous art makes these books fun and inviting for kids, and gets them to venture into these books and the topics that are addressed in the books.

  • adrienne gordon
    adrienne gordon
    1/12/2009 4:47 PM

    it is such a touchy subject, glad to get some advice, and humorous at that.

  • susan
    susan
    1/12/2009 6:07 PM

    you did a good job with a subject that most all of us will have to deal with

  • Denise
    Denise
    1/12/2009 6:46 PM

    What a great way for our young children to learn accurately about "the birds and the bees" vs. hearing distorted information from their friends and/or mass media (movies, television, etc).

  • Donna K
    Donna K
    1/12/2009 7:18 PM

    I need a book to help.

  • Timothy Sternberg
    Timothy Sternberg
    1/12/2009 7:23 PM

    I use these books in my class and they are wonderful.

  • Anne
    Anne
    1/12/2009 7:26 PM

    We've had the "It's Amazing" book for a long time (or, as we've recommended to our friends, "you must get that orange book!") At first, we read it with them, but both kids have returned to it again and again on their own over the years. New questions definitely come up as they grow, this book is a wonderful and timeless resource. I have no doubt that that "green" and that "blue" book are just as helpful!

  • Marcia
    Marcia
    1/12/2009 7:30 PM

    Kids need to get the straight scoop on sex and reproduction and yet most parents--myself included--just don't know where to start. These books sound like they could be a Godsend.

  • Jill
    Jill
    1/12/2009 7:33 PM

    Looking forward to reading all three books, even if i don't win the give away!

  • Brigid
    Brigid
    1/12/2009 7:39 PM

    I love the idea of having a set of books that may make this discussion do-able! My daughter is 10 years old and I have not ventured near this topic, but I suppose I will have to have "the talk" soon. Thank you for picking such a helpful grommet!

  • Frances Watson
    Frances Watson
    1/12/2009 7:39 PM

    this would be a great win count me in and thanks for the chance

  • Chrysa
    Chrysa
    1/12/2009 7:51 PM

    These look like a great help to make "the talk" much easier!

  • Lauren
    Lauren
    1/12/2009 8:05 PM

    I would love to have these books available even though my kids are a bit older. Reading a book written for younger kids actually may make them feel more comfortable as they laugh at the "elementary" depictions. And they'll likely learn plenty!!

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/12/2009 8:19 PM

    Books do help make the talk easier -- and you can share and read these books together with your child. Of course, many children also like to read these books on their own, especially older kids who want some privacy. Still, we can all let them know that while we respect their privacy, we are also there to answer their questions. For those parents who, for whatever reason, can't answer their child's questions, you can always turn to your nurse, or pediatrician or a trusted family member to talk with your child instead of you. All three books can help with the talk, or actually the talks, as most parents report that the talks do not last all that long. Another thing you can talk to your child about when they are reading these books or you are reading them to your child, is your family values. You may agree or perhaps even disagree with some things in the books, and if you do, this is a great time to let your child know that this is what you believe and tell them what your values are, and that others may have different family values than your family. And it's true that often older kids like reading books for younger kids, especially when first reading a book about sexuality.

  • Marcy Strahan
    Marcy Strahan
    1/12/2009 8:35 PM

    The kids are not old enough yet for the Birds & the Bee's but I want to be ready for when they are.

    I love the Grommet! Lot's of helpful info, news & review on books & products.

  • Barbara
    Barbara – Grommet Team
    1/12/2009 9:11 PM

    CONGRATULATIONS to CHRYSA, winner of autographed copies of the three books featured on our site today! THANK YOU, Robie, for these wonderful books. And keep these wonderful comments going! This is fabulous.

  • Sara
    Sara – Grommet Team
    1/12/2009 10:32 PM

    Hi Robie, Its so great to know you. A few years back, a doctor friend of ours suggested that we just buy your books, read them and casually put them in the kids' bookshelf. Just as he said, the books have "disappeared" many times, only to be put back on the shelf with well-worn pages. Thank you for helping us start the conversation!

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    1/12/2009 10:41 PM

    @Marcy I have to tell you it warmed my heart to read your "I love the Grommet." People who produce wonderful creations, like Robie, deserve a forum like this. I love that you, and everyone else, took the chance to chat with Robie.

  • Vicki
    Vicki
    1/13/2009 7:40 AM

    I had a book that was similar when I was a kid (I still remember it saying 'penis, it sounds like peanuts without the "t"'). Genius.

  • Susan Goodman
    Susan Goodman
    1/13/2009 8:01 AM

    I had It's Perfectly Normal for my son years ago, and give it or its younger equivalents at baby showers along with Goodnight Moon or Pat the Bunny. What I like about them is not only do they not shy away from what could be "harder" information, they deal with everything so directly and confidently that kids can take it in the same way.

  • Kathy
    Kathy
    1/13/2009 8:08 AM

    These books look great! A nice teaching tool for my kids. I look forward to reading them!

  • jessica ruppert
    jessica ruppert
    1/13/2009 8:08 AM

    This is a great testimonial about the books all parents need at some point! It is hard to know when the big "questions" will start and it is nice to learn about a series of books that provide great insight at any age. I am off the the book store today! Thanks for the great tip.

  • Swistle
    Swistle
    1/13/2009 8:27 AM

    Oo oo, enter me! We've gotten one of these books out of the library and LOVED it, and I would LOVE to own a set. I have five kids, and that's a lot of blushy explaining to do.

  • Swistle
    Swistle
    1/13/2009 8:30 AM

    Oh, shoot, it's the 13th today, isn't it? I hadn't changed my desk calendar yet and thought it was the 12th! Well, anyway, love the books. They're exactly what I'm looking for, and I think I'll go ahead and buy a set. Not as happy as autographed, but great books!

  • Barbara
    Barbara – Grommet Team
    1/13/2009 9:16 AM

    Swistle, sorry you missed the promotion! :) So glad you like the books, and as one of five children myself, I think we could've used a set of these around! I can assure you that the info I received (as the youngest of the crew) was hardly based on the facts. Hope these make all that blushy explaining easier for you!

  • Kate
    Kate
    1/13/2009 9:23 AM

    Just starting to think about how to approach this with my five year old. These books look like a good start.

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    1/13/2009 9:27 AM

    @jessica ruppert Jessica...glad you like this idea. Did you know you can buy the books right from our site? Just hit the "get it now" button. Today we are sending you to Amazon to finish the purchase. The majority of days, though, we ship the Grommets ourselves. I can understand if you'd like to take a field trip to the bookstore, but just want you to know you can do this from home if you prefer.

  • Dustin
    Dustin
    1/13/2009 9:50 AM

    I love the site. You guys give some many fun and wonderful ideas.

  • Pat
    Pat
    1/13/2009 9:55 AM

    I wish these books has been available when my children were young. I so admire your clear, kind, accessible, and comprehensive approach to the subjects of sexuality, masturbation, and fertility. Thanks, Robie, for a true and important service to both children and adults..

  • Robie
    Robie – Special Guest
    1/13/2009 10:42 AM

    Thanks, Pat and thank you to everyone who posted in the last 24 hours, for your comments. Now when I get stuck while writing the nonfiction books I am working on now, I will know that out there there are parents and families who do want to read books on those topics that are hard to deal with and talk about and think about, and yet, we all know that those are the kind of things we really do have to talk to our kids at all ages about, so that they realize that they are not alone in their thoughts, and concerns. As authors, we tend to work mostly alone, so knowing that all of your are out there and that the books we create can be helpful and yes, even fun, certainly keeps me and all of us who are writers working to make the best books we can for kids. After all, that is who we are writing for, THE KIDS. The times we live in are complicated, not only for us, but for our kids as well, even our young children, and if a book can help a child or a family, that's a good and lucky thing. Speaking of lucky, luckily, there are so many amazing children book authors and illustrators who are creating new books as we speak, so do check them all out. And thanks to everyone at the Daily Grommet for all you do for children and families. You are all as awesome as your site is!

  • joanne
    joanne – Grommet Team
    1/13/2009 11:49 AM

    Thank you....Robie Harris for spending the day with us. It's been so special for us all to hear you respond to questions with the insight, warmth and honesty that we witness in your books.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.