Bellyak

Prone Paddling

Bellyak is a prone kayak that makes for a fun new way to explore the water, while also giving you a different perspective. It is built for you to lay on, and is powered by your arms—no paddles needed. The lightweight kayaks are made in North Carolina and have an ergonomic design built to keep you feeling comfortable while you’re maneuvering on the water. There are different styles suited for fresh and salt water, and for different ability levels, too. It’s something both newbies and seasoned kayakers will enjoy trying out. Our CEO, Jules, really enjoyed her time on a Bellyak. After her paddling trip was over, she liked that it gave her a new way to float on the water. Maker Adam Masters created the prone kayak out of necessity after a hurricane hit his area. The high water and low trees meant he couldn’t sit up in his kayak to get to safety. So he duct-taped the spray skirt over the opening and laid down. This DIY-design helped Adam get out, and he liked how it felt to control it with his arms. Twenty-four prototypes later, Bellyak was born.

Bellyak

Prone Kayaks

Prone Paddling

Bellyak is a prone kayak that makes for a fun new way to explore the water, while also giving you a different perspective. It is built for you to lay on, and is powered by your arms—no paddles needed. The lightweight kayaks are made in North Carolina and have an ergonomic design built to keep you feeling comfortable while you’re maneuvering on the water. There are different styles suited for fresh and salt water, and for different ability levels, too. It’s something both newbies and seasoned kayakers will enjoy trying out. Our CEO, Jules, really enjoyed her time on a Bellyak. After her paddling trip was over, she liked that it gave her a new way to float on the water. Maker Adam Masters created the prone kayak out of necessity after a hurricane hit his area. The high water and low trees meant he couldn’t sit up in his kayak to get to safety. So he duct-taped the spray skirt over the opening and laid down. This DIY-design helped Adam get out, and he liked how it felt to control it with his arms. Twenty-four prototypes later, Bellyak was born.
Bellyak
Independent Maker
Tech & Innovation

Quick Questions

Which prone kayak is right for me?

All of the prone kayaks can be used in any type of water. Refer to the guide on choosing your prone kayak to help you choose.

The Play 35 and 45 Prone Kayaks were designed primarily for whitewater, but are also fun in the surf and are a lightweight alternative for prone paddling workouts on the lake.

The Play 35 Prone Kayak was designed and modeled after classic freestyle kayaks for paddlers 65-190 pounds. This means the Play 35 is maneuverable, agile, and wide open to your interpretation.

For an even more stable ride for paddlers 130-300 pounds, and for those tackling bigger water and harder drops, they recommend the Play 45 Prone Kayak.

The Frequency Crossover Prone Kayak is the largest Bellyak and the most stable for paddlers 90-220 pounds. It is especially great for flatwater and fitness paddling. The Frequency Crossover Prone Kayak allows people of almost any ability to access the freedom and joy of watersports, using the same equipment, with little or no modifications necessary. Learn more about Bellyak adaptive paddling products.

How is it different from a kayak?

At first, the similarities are vast: it has a similar shape, similar size, and similar hull profile. But that’s where the similarities end. For one, you are laying prone with maximum surface area connected to the water. You can feel every current through your entire body, making the experience much more visceral. You are closer to the water, and with a changed perspective comes a renewed sense of adventure on familiar water. Rather than a paddle connecting you to the water, you are using your arms and hands to navigate, allowing you to feel and move with the water in a way never before possible.

Will it hurt my back/neck?

Countless hours of design have gone into ensuring the body area of the Bellyak is as ergonomic as possible: over 24 prototypes were build to get the “nipple to knee” ratio just right. What is that? It’s a consistent curve from the chest area to the knees that allows for a comfortable prone position without stressing any part of the back.

Is it harder than a kayak?

There is no skirt and there are no straps on the Bellyak, so it’s easy to get on and off. You do fit down inside the Bellyak, where the sidewalls hold you in place. On flatwater it’s very easy to stay on. In whitewater, it doesn’t take long for you to learn the way of the currents and stay on the boat. It’s harder in that you have to work with the currents and not against them. You’ll get the hang of it in no time.

Am I going to smash my face?

The Bellyak is between 7.5 and 8.5 feet long, you have a lot of boat in front of you. Plus, the rocker of the boat allows you to ride up and over river features as opposed to hitting them directly.

Learn more about the products

Frequency Crossover Prone Kayak see details Play Prone Kayak see details

Bellyak

Prone Kayaks

Prone Paddling

Bellyak is a prone kayak that makes for a fun new way to explore the water, while also giving you a different perspective. It is built for you to lay on, and is powered by your arms—no paddles needed.

The lightweight kayaks are made in North Carolina and have an ergonomic design built to keep you feeling comfortable while you’re
maneuvering on the water. There are different styles suited for fresh and salt water, and for different ability levels, too. It’s something both newbies and seasoned kayakers will enjoy trying out. Our CEO, Jules, really enjoyed her time on a Bellyak. After her paddling trip was over, she liked that it gave her a new way to float on the water.

Maker Adam Masters created the prone kayak out of necessity after a hurricane hit his area. The high water and low trees meant he couldn’t sit up in his kayak to get to safety. So he duct-taped the spray skirt over the opening and laid down. This DIY-design helped Adam get out, and he liked how it felt to control it with his arms. Twenty-four prototypes later, Bellyak was born.
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Quick Questions

Which prone kayak is right for me?

All of the prone kayaks can be used in any type of water. Refer to the guide on choosing your prone kayak to help you choose.

The Play 35 and 45 Prone Kayaks were designed primarily for whitewater, but are also fun in the surf and are a lightweight alternative for prone paddling workouts on the lake.

The Play 35 Prone Kayak was designed and modeled after classic freestyle kayaks for paddlers 65-190 pounds. This means the Play 35 is maneuverable, agile, and wide open to your interpretation.

For an even more stable ride for paddlers 130-300 pounds, and for those tackling bigger water and harder drops, they recommend the Play 45 Prone Kayak.

The Frequency Crossover Prone Kayak is the largest Bellyak and the most stable for paddlers 90-220 pounds. It is especially great for flatwater and fitness paddling. The Frequency Crossover Prone Kayak allows people of almost any ability to access the freedom and joy of watersports, using the same equipment, with little or no modifications necessary. Learn more about Bellyak adaptive paddling products.

How is it different from a kayak?

At first, the similarities are vast: it has a similar shape, similar size, and similar hull profile. But that’s where the similarities end. For one, you are laying prone with maximum surface area connected to the water. You can feel every current through your entire body, making the experience much more visceral. You are closer to the water, and with a changed perspective comes a renewed sense of adventure on familiar water. Rather than a paddle connecting you to the water, you are using your arms and hands to navigate, allowing you to feel and move with the water in a way never before possible.

Will it hurt my back/neck?

Countless hours of design have gone into ensuring the body area of the Bellyak is as ergonomic as possible: over 24 prototypes were build to get the “nipple to knee” ratio just right. What is that? It’s a consistent curve from the chest area to the knees that allows for a comfortable prone position without stressing any part of the back.

Is it harder than a kayak?

There is no skirt and there are no straps on the Bellyak, so it’s easy to get on and off. You do fit down inside the Bellyak, where the sidewalls hold you in place. On flatwater it’s very easy to stay on. In whitewater, it doesn’t take long for you to learn the way of the currents and stay on the boat. It’s harder in that you have to work with the currents and not against them. You’ll get the hang of it in no time.

Am I going to smash my face?

The Bellyak is between 7.5 and 8.5 feet long, you have a lot of boat in front of you. Plus, the rocker of the boat allows you to ride up and over river features as opposed to hitting them directly.

Learn more about the products

Frequency Crossover Prone Kayak see details Play Prone Kayak see details