Take Note

Former high school teacher Bob Williams and his wife Jeanette created Book Darts to enable students and booklovers to mark their pages and notable passages without leaving a lasting mark. With Book Darts, you can quickly and easily note and relocate meaningful lines of text for future reference and discussion on books both borrowed and owned. Unlike paper clips that leave a dent and sticky notes that can be an eyesore, Book Darts are safe, easy to use, and aesthetically pleasing. An elegant alternative to highlighting, underlining, and folding page corners, these precision-cut, paper thin, metal line markers are just the thing for students who need to keep their books in good condition for re-use or resale. One tester found Book Darts especially useful for tagging recipes in her cookbooks. Made in the USA and packaged in a gift-ready tin, Book Darts let bookworms both mark and preserve the beauty of the written word.

Book Darts

Metal Line Markers

Take Note

Former high school teacher Bob Williams and his wife Jeanette created Book Darts to enable students and booklovers to mark their pages and notable passages without leaving a lasting mark. With Book Darts, you can quickly and easily note and relocate meaningful lines of text for future reference and discussion on books both borrowed and owned. Unlike paper clips that leave a dent and sticky notes that can be an eyesore, Book Darts are safe, easy to use, and aesthetically pleasing. An elegant alternative to highlighting, underlining, and folding page corners, these precision-cut, paper thin, metal line markers are just the thing for students who need to keep their books in good condition for re-use or resale. One tester found Book Darts especially useful for tagging recipes in her cookbooks. Made in the USA and packaged in a gift-ready tin, Book Darts let bookworms both mark and preserve the beauty of the written word.
Made in the USA

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Bob
    Bob

    We’re happy to be here on The Grommet! Love for books initially spurred the idea of Book Darts. Marking a book with a pen or high-lighter, turning down page corners or using paper clips to tag important passages only shortens a book‘s life. Book Darts were developed to enrich the reading experience by allowing readers to mark important lines and easily re-find them without harming the pages (and, thus, to encourage re-reading).

  • Barbara
    Barbara
    8/26/2014 1:03 PM

    These have been available for years at Levenger.com -- called "Book Nibs." They're a great product and yours are less expensive. Just not a new invention.

  • Bob
    Bob – Special Guest
    8/26/2014 1:23 PM

    Hi Barbara - The truth is, Book Darts are the original Book Nibs... For years, Book Darts enjoyed a partnership with the Levenger Catalog Co., who marketed our darts under the name Page Points. They eventually dropped Book Darts in favor of their own "redesigned" linemarkers, called Book Nibs. Many of their customers however weren't happy with the results and these days some of our strongest testimonials come from Levenger customers searching for the original Page Point.

  • Amy
    Amy – Grommet Team
    8/26/2014 2:19 PM

    Hi Bob,

    Amy from The Grommet team here. Thank you so much for this wonderful response. The fact that you were able to bring these cherished darts back to life is a testament to your devotion as a Maker and we are proud to have you as a Grommet.

  • Kathy
    Kathy
    8/26/2014 1:15 PM

    These are great. I've used them for years - they used to be available through BasBleu. Glad I can get them direct for the maker now.

  • Bob
    Bob – Special Guest
    8/26/2014 1:27 PM

    Thanks Kathy. It's been some time since Bas Bleu stocked our Darts. We're very happy now to make them available through The Grommet!

  • Kelly
    Kelly
    8/26/2014 1:43 PM

    @Bob Just because something is not brand new, doesn’t mean it doesn’t

    deserve attention if it is a great product. I have long admired

    and used this item for their functionality, not for its name. I also

    once sourced them from Levenger. It’s great to see them again

    and I think Grommet fans will appreciate sourcing them here

    just as I am doing.

    Kelly

  • Bob
    Bob – Special Guest
    8/26/2014 2:49 PM

    Thanks, Kelly,

    Apropos your comment, we like to say that any book you haven't read is a new book.

  • Nancy
    Nancy
    8/26/2014 1:47 PM

    I have been using these for years. I got them from a local book store that has since been closed. They are so great & I'm so happy to find them again.

  • Bob
    Bob – Special Guest
    8/26/2014 2:53 PM

    @Nancy

    We like to support local stores even if it means waiting a few days for our book. What's the hurry? Is such hurrying part of our present problems?

    How but for bookstores can we browse until that book in our hand calls to us? And how about the great gain from roaming around a bookstore with someone and showing each other books we had forgotten but treasured?

  • Belinda
    Belinda
    8/26/2014 1:49 PM

    I love these and I am still using ones I've had for years. Books are sacred and should be used, not abused. Thank you for bringing them to the Grommet.

  • martha
    martha
    8/26/2014 2:18 PM

    @Belinda

    A hearty AMEN to the sacredness of books. Am ordering these little gadgets. Digital is okay, but I love the feel of a real book.

  • Bob
    Bob – Special Guest
    8/26/2014 2:58 PM

    @martha

    I have to say that after reading an essay by Mortimer Adler called "How to mark a book", I am less fastidious about pristine than I started in this process. If it is your book, treat it as you need to to squeeze as much out of it as you can.

    My college hallmate, Henry Taylor, who won a Pulitzer for poetry, said at first that 'these things are ridiculous'.

    Then he said he started doing translations of Greek plays for a series edited by David Slavitt and needed "a bushel for the library books" he was using.

  • Kay
    Kay
    8/26/2014 2:41 PM

    I have been a book darts user for ages, and I keep a supply on hand for every kind of page or line marking need...I have given them as gifts to my friends, and some have even asked for more! My favorite are the silver colored ones....Glad to see them offered here!

  • Bob
    Bob – Special Guest
    8/26/2014 3:04 PM

    @Kay

    I like the bronze ones most because my cloudy old eyes pick them up better against white book edges, but lately I am into color coding. E.g., I use the stainless ones when I note that I have actually misread a word or several and, on more forced rereading, been surprised at myself.

    I'm trying to find a pattern to how and when that happens in doing some case by case research into how we read, and using a different color is useful.

  • Lois
    Lois
    8/26/2014 6:08 PM

    I love Book Darts mostly for their elegance. It is a particularly pleasurable sensation to slip one over the edge of the page and tap it flush

    with my fingernail. It also gives me pleasure to open one of my own books and be surprised to read where I placed a dart years earlier.

  • bob
    bob
    8/26/2014 7:57 PM

    @Lois amen. I find books I cannot remember reading and then am reconnected with as I follow the "Dart crumbs" (bred crumbs the birds won't eat).

    One of my students, Nate Dunn, said, "In a cook book, they'll just make sure your food tastes good; in a mushroom book, one could save your life."

    I'm often surprised by old, but darted recipes I'd forgotten I ever used but can almost taste again as I look them over.

  • William
    William
    8/26/2014 8:21 PM

    Wow!! I never thought I would see the person who invented Book Darts! Years ago, I received a can as a gift (they were purchased from Lee Valley) and I use them still. I do not know what the manufacturing process is, but I think it would be great if "Book Dart" could be embossed on each dart. That way, when I leave one in a library book, the next reader will know what it is and can look you up.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

Book Darts

Metal Line Markers

Take Note

Former high school teacher Bob Williams and his wife Jeanette created Book Darts to enable students and booklovers to mark their pages and notable passages without leaving a lasting mark.

With Book Darts, you can quickly and easily note and relocate meaningful lines of text for future reference and discussion on books both
borrowed and owned. Unlike paper clips that leave a dent and sticky notes that can be an eyesore, Book Darts are safe, easy to use, and aesthetically pleasing.

An elegant alternative to highlighting, underlining, and folding page corners, these precision-cut, paper thin, metal line markers are just the thing for students who need to keep their books in good condition for re-use or resale. One tester found Book Darts especially useful for tagging recipes in her cookbooks. Made in the USA and packaged in a gift-ready tin, Book Darts let bookworms both mark and preserve the beauty of the written word.
Read More Read Less
Book Darts - Metal Line Markers

Shop Book Darts Products

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Bob
    Bob

    We’re happy to be here on The Grommet! Love for books initially spurred the idea of Book Darts. Marking a book with a pen or high-lighter, turning down page corners or using paper clips to tag important passages only shortens a book‘s life. Book Darts were developed to enrich the reading experience by allowing readers to mark important lines and easily re-find them without harming the pages (and, thus, to encourage re-reading).

  • Barbara
    Barbara
    8/26/2014 1:03 PM

    These have been available for years at Levenger.com -- called "Book Nibs." They're a great product and yours are less expensive. Just not a new invention.

  • Bob
    Bob – Special Guest
    8/26/2014 1:23 PM

    Hi Barbara - The truth is, Book Darts are the original Book Nibs... For years, Book Darts enjoyed a partnership with the Levenger Catalog Co., who marketed our darts under the name Page Points. They eventually dropped Book Darts in favor of their own "redesigned" linemarkers, called Book Nibs. Many of their customers however weren't happy with the results and these days some of our strongest testimonials come from Levenger customers searching for the original Page Point.

  • Amy
    Amy – Grommet Team
    8/26/2014 2:19 PM

    Hi Bob,

    Amy from The Grommet team here. Thank you so much for this wonderful response. The fact that you were able to bring these cherished darts back to life is a testament to your devotion as a Maker and we are proud to have you as a Grommet.

  • Kathy
    Kathy
    8/26/2014 1:15 PM

    These are great. I've used them for years - they used to be available through BasBleu. Glad I can get them direct for the maker now.

  • Bob
    Bob – Special Guest
    8/26/2014 1:27 PM

    Thanks Kathy. It's been some time since Bas Bleu stocked our Darts. We're very happy now to make them available through The Grommet!

  • Kelly
    Kelly
    8/26/2014 1:43 PM

    @Bob Just because something is not brand new, doesn’t mean it doesn’t

    deserve attention if it is a great product. I have long admired

    and used this item for their functionality, not for its name. I also

    once sourced them from Levenger. It’s great to see them again

    and I think Grommet fans will appreciate sourcing them here

    just as I am doing.

    Kelly

  • Bob
    Bob – Special Guest
    8/26/2014 2:49 PM

    Thanks, Kelly,

    Apropos your comment, we like to say that any book you haven't read is a new book.

  • Nancy
    Nancy
    8/26/2014 1:47 PM

    I have been using these for years. I got them from a local book store that has since been closed. They are so great & I'm so happy to find them again.

  • Bob
    Bob – Special Guest
    8/26/2014 2:53 PM

    @Nancy

    We like to support local stores even if it means waiting a few days for our book. What's the hurry? Is such hurrying part of our present problems?

    How but for bookstores can we browse until that book in our hand calls to us? And how about the great gain from roaming around a bookstore with someone and showing each other books we had forgotten but treasured?

  • Belinda
    Belinda
    8/26/2014 1:49 PM

    I love these and I am still using ones I've had for years. Books are sacred and should be used, not abused. Thank you for bringing them to the Grommet.

  • martha
    martha
    8/26/2014 2:18 PM

    @Belinda

    A hearty AMEN to the sacredness of books. Am ordering these little gadgets. Digital is okay, but I love the feel of a real book.

  • Bob
    Bob – Special Guest
    8/26/2014 2:58 PM

    @martha

    I have to say that after reading an essay by Mortimer Adler called "How to mark a book", I am less fastidious about pristine than I started in this process. If it is your book, treat it as you need to to squeeze as much out of it as you can.

    My college hallmate, Henry Taylor, who won a Pulitzer for poetry, said at first that 'these things are ridiculous'.

    Then he said he started doing translations of Greek plays for a series edited by David Slavitt and needed "a bushel for the library books" he was using.

  • Kay
    Kay
    8/26/2014 2:41 PM

    I have been a book darts user for ages, and I keep a supply on hand for every kind of page or line marking need...I have given them as gifts to my friends, and some have even asked for more! My favorite are the silver colored ones....Glad to see them offered here!

  • Bob
    Bob – Special Guest
    8/26/2014 3:04 PM

    @Kay

    I like the bronze ones most because my cloudy old eyes pick them up better against white book edges, but lately I am into color coding. E.g., I use the stainless ones when I note that I have actually misread a word or several and, on more forced rereading, been surprised at myself.

    I'm trying to find a pattern to how and when that happens in doing some case by case research into how we read, and using a different color is useful.

  • Lois
    Lois
    8/26/2014 6:08 PM

    I love Book Darts mostly for their elegance. It is a particularly pleasurable sensation to slip one over the edge of the page and tap it flush

    with my fingernail. It also gives me pleasure to open one of my own books and be surprised to read where I placed a dart years earlier.

  • bob
    bob
    8/26/2014 7:57 PM

    @Lois amen. I find books I cannot remember reading and then am reconnected with as I follow the "Dart crumbs" (bred crumbs the birds won't eat).

    One of my students, Nate Dunn, said, "In a cook book, they'll just make sure your food tastes good; in a mushroom book, one could save your life."

    I'm often surprised by old, but darted recipes I'd forgotten I ever used but can almost taste again as I look them over.

  • William
    William
    8/26/2014 8:21 PM

    Wow!! I never thought I would see the person who invented Book Darts! Years ago, I received a can as a gift (they were purchased from Lee Valley) and I use them still. I do not know what the manufacturing process is, but I think it would be great if "Book Dart" could be embossed on each dart. That way, when I leave one in a library book, the next reader will know what it is and can look you up.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.