Cold brew at home

Depending on where they were grown, coffee beans have distinct flavors just like grapes. Cold brewing is the best way to bring out the full taste of your favorite roast. And Bruer lets you do that at home, the office, or anywhere else. The cold brew process (also known as slow drip) filters cold water through ground coffee—no electricity or heat needed. It produces coffee that is stronger, smoother, and undeniably delicious. It’s also less acidic than coffee brewed with hot water. Coffee lovers Andy Clark and Gabe Herz designed Bruer as a minimalistic and efficient cold brewer that is simple to use and stunning to look at. Made of food-grade silicone, stainless steel, and borosilicate glass, it’s dishwasher safe, too. In as little as four hours, Bruer brews flavorful coffee that stays fresh in the fridge for up to two weeks. If you’re a fan of hot coffee, just heat it up. Or drink it cold. Either way, you’ll enjoy your cup like never before.

Bruer

Cold Brew Coffee Maker

Cold brew at home

Depending on where they were grown, coffee beans have distinct flavors just like grapes. Cold brewing is the best way to bring out the full taste of your favorite roast. And Bruer lets you do that at home, the office, or anywhere else. The cold brew process (also known as slow drip) filters cold water through ground coffee—no electricity or heat needed. It produces coffee that is stronger, smoother, and undeniably delicious. It’s also less acidic than coffee brewed with hot water. Coffee lovers Andy Clark and Gabe Herz designed Bruer as a minimalistic and efficient cold brewer that is simple to use and stunning to look at. Made of food-grade silicone, stainless steel, and borosilicate glass, it’s dishwasher safe, too. In as little as four hours, Bruer brews flavorful coffee that stays fresh in the fridge for up to two weeks. If you’re a fan of hot coffee, just heat it up. Or drink it cold. Either way, you’ll enjoy your cup like never before.

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Andy
    Andy

    Hello everyone! I'm proud to introduce Bruer to The Grommet. I'd be happy to answer any questions you have!

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    10/30/2015 5:44 PM

    What are the advantages of Bruer over other cold brew makers or even store bought cold brew coffee?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 10:13 AM

    With Cold Bruer’s set-up, water drips slowly through a bed of coffee, and collects below in the carafe. This allows for more control over the extraction process than the full immersion process where coffee grounds just sit in a container of water and then manually filtered after about 24 hours. The slow-drip process produces a smooth, clean cup of ready to drink cold brew. It’s not a concentrate like other methods. This gives the Cold Bruer its higher flavor clarity by not needing to add water to the finished product.

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    10/30/2015 5:45 PM

    Was developing a business around Bruer an ‘aha’ moment or more of a gradual process?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 10:17 AM

    @Mike It’s been more of a gradual process. We always loved the ritual of making coffee as much as we enjoyed drinking it, and that has been the base of our brand. when we started out we really were just trying to make some awesome coffee. It wasn't until our kickstarter campaign was overly successful that we decided this was something we could build a company around.

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    10/30/2015 5:45 PM

    What was the toughest part about bringing this to life?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 10:18 AM

    @Mike We launched our first product on Kickstarter back in September of 2013, We gained huge support from our backers, and we didn't want to let them down. Even though we had lined up manufacturing beforehand, as they always do many issues came up. We learned some manufactures tend to over promise. The hard thing with a startup is, well, starting from scratch. Everyday some small crisis happens that we don’t really know how to solve, but we keep pushing, learning and critiquing ourselves as we move forward. It’s been exciting, and now that we are a little over 2 years old, it’s more like every other day we have a crisis to advert.

  • JAYMIE
    JAYMIE
    11/2/2015 10:35 AM

    It looks possible to use for tea cold brewing. Is it?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 10:47 AM

    Hi @JAYMIE We have done some experiments with cold brewing tea using the Cold Bruer .it takes a little more playing with to get the right tea to water ratio, but we have had some pretty good results!

  • Dee
    Dee
    11/2/2015 10:48 AM

    I see from the information section that this coffee can be heated. Does that negatively impact the results of cold brewing at all? I do like a steaming cup of joe!

    Thanks, Dee

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 10:52 AM

    @Dee yeah, you can heat up cold brew, we will usually make it a little more concentrated by using less water during the brewing process, and then add hot water to it. you still get the benefits of the cold brewing process because you don't heat up the beans.

  • Gwen
    Gwen
    11/2/2015 10:55 AM

    So for us hot coffee fans (ice coffee is good - but not the same ahhhh it's morning experience when it's cold!), what do you recommend for heating and not burning?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 10:57 AM

    @Gwen I definitely know what you mean! we love our hot coffee too. If we want hot cold brew we will usually make a cold brew concentrate, then mix 50/50 with hot water from the kettle.

  • Lynn
    Lynn
    11/2/2015 11:06 AM

    In the video, it looks like there's a paper/filter on top of the coffee grounds, but the video doesn't mention a filter. Is a filter required, and if so, where would those be available?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 11:08 AM

    @Lynn yes, we use a paper filter on top of the coffee to help spread the water evenly. This is the same filter used in the aeropress, and can be found all over. Cold Bruer also comes with a pack of 100.

  • Cindy
    Cindy
    11/2/2015 11:06 AM

    I see that this comes with 100 paper filters--does this require a special filter to use, or will regular coffee filters work with it?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 11:11 AM

    @Cindy We recommend using Aeropress filters, they are a pretty standard and can be found all over.

  • Fred
    Fred
    11/2/2015 11:07 AM

    Seems very pricey compared to others I've seen.

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 11:15 AM

    Hi @Fred Cold Bruer uses the slow drip method instead of the more common full immersion method where you just put ground coffee in water and then manually filter it out later these products tend to be cheaper because the resulting coffee you get isn't as good, and they are usually made of plastic.

    Cold Bruer on the other hand comparatively makes a much cleaner cup of coffee with a lot more flavor clarity. It is also made with all high quality materials like borosilicate glass, stainless steel, and food grade silicone.

  • Saad
    Saad
    11/2/2015 11:30 AM

    Hello Andy ,

    Is this BPA free , Thanks

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 11:33 AM

    Hi @SAAD,

    yes, Cold Bruer is BPA free. We use all high quality materials including borosilicate glass, stainless steel, and food grade silicone. No plastic :)

  • MARTIN
    MARTIN
    11/2/2015 11:50 AM

    How many ounces in a full carafe?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 11:57 AM

    Hi @MARTIN,

    Cold Bruer can make up to 20 fluid ounces at a time.

  • Michelle
    Michelle
    11/2/2015 12:01 PM

    Does it come in other colors? If not, will you do other colors in the future..like black?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 12:02 PM

    @Michelle Only blue right now. We hope to have more colors soon.

  • Michelle
    Michelle
    11/2/2015 12:10 PM

    @Andy

    Will black be a definite option? I find this blue very off-putting.

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 12:39 PM

    @Michelle,

    Black is not a definite at this point, but we will definitely look into it.

  • Linda
    Linda
    11/2/2015 12:10 PM

    Hi! I LOVE cold brewing! I would like your input on how your Breuer differs from two other methods of cold coffee brewing that I have used.

    Years ago I purchased a cold brewer called a Toddy, which I absolutely hated. It was messy, ugly, and it didn't hold up in the long run because the glass part was thin and fragile. The brewing chamber was made of noxious plastic and I wasn't comfortable drinking coffee that had soaked in plastic for 12 hours. There were quality issues because the glass in the carafe was so thin that it broke within a week and I ended up brewing from the toddy brewing chamber into a glass mason jar. So I ditched it for a large, inexpensive french press - I just put in the required amount of grounds the night before and in the morning I plunge down the press for great coffee concentrate.. The french press is beautiful, and my brewing coffee only comes in contact with glass instead of plastic!

    Your unit looks like it addresses the issue of how ugly the Toddy was because this it a really attractive unit that I wouldn't mind seeing on my kitchen counter for a few hours every day. And from the video, it seems like it is clean and easy to get the grounds out without making a mess. Could you tell me how sturdy or thin the glass carafe is? And I am thinking that the brewing chamber is made of some kind of plastic or acrylic - is it BPA free? And how long does the brewing coffee come into contact with the plastic / acrylic brewing chamber? Are there any disposable parts to replace? My old Toddy had expensive filters that had to be replaced regularly.)

    Also, could you address the differences between brewing cold coffee in The Bruer as opposed to a French Press? I really love my French Press, but the glass is still super thin and I have been looking for something sturdier because it is so fragile that I know it will be broken soon or later! Is your carafe similar to a French Press or is it thick and sturdy like a mason jar?

    Thanks for any comments that compare and contrast the Breuer with the Toddy and the French Press!

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 12:34 PM

    Hi @Linda,

    Thanks for the questions. The two main components of Cold Bruer are borosilicate glass, which is a pretty durable material the same type of glass used in a french press. We have made it as thick as the manufacturing process allows, There is no plastic, so no BPA. Cold Bruer uses paper filters on top of the coffee to help disperse the water. These are common Aeropress filters, and can be found pretty easily (Cold Bruer also comes with 100 to start).

    As for the difference between Toddy/french press, they both are a method called full immersion, as you know with that method you put ground coffee in water, and then filter manually later. There are a couple advantages to Cold Bruer's slow drip method over full immersion. First once you set up Cold Bruer you don't need to remember to come back and filter the coffee as the slow drip process filters the coffee as it goes. You also get a much cleaner cup of coffee because the coffee isn't moving around and acts like its own filter, and with out all that extra sediment you increase the flavor clarity of the coffee.

  • Linda
    Linda
    11/2/2015 3:57 PM

    @Andy Thanks! Just to clarify, both the brewing chamber and the carafe are glass? That is awesome!

    Also, since you use filters, is there any issues with the filters clogging while the drip process is going on? My Toddy clogged horribly and it took sometimes 24 hours to finish. The french press never clogs, but there is some sediment that is left in the final product.

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    11/2/2015 5:25 PM

    Hi Linda, you shouldn't have any clogging trouble because it is the paper and coffee that serves as the filter, not a traditional filter. All residue will be left on the paper filter which makes for a very efficient clean-up process!

  • May
    May
    11/2/2015 12:11 PM

    I have to drink less coffee due to the acid so this process sounds good ...do you know If it would be OK to warm the coffee afterwards ...I need to drink warm coffee in the mornings

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    11/2/2015 12:29 PM

    Hi May, it will be more than OK! Andy said above he uses half cold water and half water from a kettle to get the best of both worlds. Your morning coffee needs will be met even more deliciously!

  • Lynnette
    Lynnette
    11/2/2015 12:31 PM

    All cold brewers I have owned used an expensive, hard to find, felt filter......what does this use?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 12:37 PM

    Hi @Lynnette,

    Cold Bruer uses a durable, and reusable stainless steel filter on the bottom. And aeropress paper filters on top to help disperse the water. Aeropress filters are pretty well priced. you can find 350 packs for under $5 all over.

  • Cheryl
    Cheryl
    11/2/2015 1:10 PM

    Is this the only size that you have for this product? Do you have one that could make 32 or 64 oz of iced coffee?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 1:12 PM

    @Cheryl Yeah, right now we only make Cold Bruer in one size.

  • Cheryl
    Cheryl
    11/2/2015 1:31 PM

    @Andy thanks, my husband drinks iced coffee like I drink iced sun tea in the summer so it would have been nice not to have to refill it more then once. You might want to consider a larger model.

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    11/2/2015 5:31 PM

    If it wasn't on their radar before, I'm sure it is now, Cheryl. Thanks for the suggestion!

  • Kathleen
    Kathleen
    11/2/2015 7:30 PM

    @Mike Would like to second the request for a larger size, hoping to bump it up in your priority :)

  • Jerry
    Jerry
    11/2/2015 1:24 PM

    The video shows you using ice water. I don't usually have ice around, and wondering if cold or room temperature water will work as well?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 1:35 PM

    @Jerry,

    Short Answer:

    Ice is not necessary for brewing. You just want to make sure the water temp stays constant, you can do that by using ice, brewing in the fridge, or using room temperature water.

    Long answer:

    We have found that some water sources contain more dissolved gasses then others, meaning there will be more air bubbles created, and those air bubbles can slow down the drip on Cold Bruer. But if you keep the water at a constant temperature those air bubbles form at a slower rate and wont effect the drip. So as long as you keep the temperature consistent you don't need to brew with ice.

  • Kirk
    Kirk
    11/2/2015 1:45 PM

    @Andy

    In your video you said you couldn't find an inexpensive cold brewer. Mine cost around $30, I brew a lb at a time , and it tastes just like the stuff I get at the coffee store which uses the big drip brewers like your process. So another $49 to make smaller batches I may not like any better just doesn't seem like enough of a reason to try this. and it's made in China. I might have been interested if it was made here and $30 cheaper.

  • RD
    RD
    11/2/2015 1:53 PM

    @Kirk What kind do you have?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 1:58 PM

    Hi @Kirk,

    Thanks for the comment, Our process uses a slow drip process instead of the full immersion method that you are talking about. Other Cold brewers that use the slow drip method tend to be much more expensive ($200 +) .We personally like the flavor clarity and the clean cup this method produces, and that is why we decided to make a version that could be used at home.

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    11/2/2015 2:15 PM

    Kirk, you just can't beat that slow...

    Bruer

  • Andrew
    Andrew
    11/2/2015 2:17 PM

    @Mike take my money.

  • RD
    RD
    11/2/2015 1:53 PM

    What are you favorite grounds. Any suggestions for a non-coffee drinker who likes cold Starbucks Mocha drinks.

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 2:02 PM

    @RD we really like african coffees because they tend to have fruity and floral notes. If you are looking for chocolate notes I would recommend using a coffee from Latin America, this cold brewing process is great for pulling out those nutty and smooth chocolaty flavors!

  • Dan
    Dan
    11/2/2015 3:00 PM

    @RD Hey there, I'm a video producer at The Grommet, and fellow coffee fan. I'd highly suggest looking for a local coffee roaster and picking up a bag of their coffee that's been roasted in the past few days. Freshly roasted coffee can turn a non-coffee drinker into a coffee drinker, pretty quickly. Enjoy your coffee and good luck!

  • Randy
    Randy
    11/2/2015 9:05 PM

    Why not make it in the USA, China produces junk items.

  • Randy
    Randy
    11/2/2015 9:07 PM

    @Randy As an add on. You lost a sale.

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    11/2/2015 9:28 PM

    @Randy We do not launch or support junk at Grommet. But every country is capable of producing inferior products, that's one thing we can agree on. Swing on over to our group of Made in USA products: https://www.thegrommet.com/made-in-the-usa I will be happy to see your support of those products too.

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 10:17 PM

    @Randy Thanks for the question. Our main goal with Cold Bruer was to take the really awesome process of slow drip cold brewing that you can usually only find in high end coffee shops and make it available at an affordable price for home use. When we started out we looked into manufacturing in the united states, but were not able to find any factories that were able to produce our glass components at a price that would be reasonable to our customers. We spent a lot of time in China in order to find the best possible factories, and went through endless quality checks to make sure we produced the best product possible. We are very pleased with the quality of our product, and the price we are able to offer it at. I understand where your coming from, but unfortunately manufacturing Cold Bruer in the USA is not an option.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

Bruer

Cold Brew Coffee Maker

Cold brew at home

Depending on where they were grown, coffee beans have distinct flavors just like grapes. Cold brewing is the best way to bring out the full taste of your favorite roast. And Bruer lets you do that at home, the office, or anywhere else.

The cold brew process (also known as slow drip) filters cold water through ground coffee—no
electricity or heat needed. It produces coffee that is stronger, smoother, and undeniably delicious. It’s also less acidic than coffee brewed with hot water.

Coffee lovers Andy Clark and Gabe Herz designed Bruer as a minimalistic and efficient cold brewer that is simple to use and stunning to look at. Made of food-grade silicone, stainless steel, and borosilicate glass, it’s dishwasher safe, too.

In as little as four hours, Bruer brews flavorful coffee that stays fresh in the fridge for up to two weeks. If you’re a fan of hot coffee, just heat it up. Or drink it cold. Either way, you’ll enjoy your cup like never before.
Read More Read Less
Cold brew coffee. In your kitchen.

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Andy
    Andy

    Hello everyone! I'm proud to introduce Bruer to The Grommet. I'd be happy to answer any questions you have!

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    10/30/2015 5:44 PM

    What are the advantages of Bruer over other cold brew makers or even store bought cold brew coffee?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 10:13 AM

    With Cold Bruer’s set-up, water drips slowly through a bed of coffee, and collects below in the carafe. This allows for more control over the extraction process than the full immersion process where coffee grounds just sit in a container of water and then manually filtered after about 24 hours. The slow-drip process produces a smooth, clean cup of ready to drink cold brew. It’s not a concentrate like other methods. This gives the Cold Bruer its higher flavor clarity by not needing to add water to the finished product.

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    10/30/2015 5:45 PM

    Was developing a business around Bruer an ‘aha’ moment or more of a gradual process?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 10:17 AM

    @Mike It’s been more of a gradual process. We always loved the ritual of making coffee as much as we enjoyed drinking it, and that has been the base of our brand. when we started out we really were just trying to make some awesome coffee. It wasn't until our kickstarter campaign was overly successful that we decided this was something we could build a company around.

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    10/30/2015 5:45 PM

    What was the toughest part about bringing this to life?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 10:18 AM

    @Mike We launched our first product on Kickstarter back in September of 2013, We gained huge support from our backers, and we didn't want to let them down. Even though we had lined up manufacturing beforehand, as they always do many issues came up. We learned some manufactures tend to over promise. The hard thing with a startup is, well, starting from scratch. Everyday some small crisis happens that we don’t really know how to solve, but we keep pushing, learning and critiquing ourselves as we move forward. It’s been exciting, and now that we are a little over 2 years old, it’s more like every other day we have a crisis to advert.

  • JAYMIE
    JAYMIE
    11/2/2015 10:35 AM

    It looks possible to use for tea cold brewing. Is it?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 10:47 AM

    Hi @JAYMIE We have done some experiments with cold brewing tea using the Cold Bruer .it takes a little more playing with to get the right tea to water ratio, but we have had some pretty good results!

  • Dee
    Dee
    11/2/2015 10:48 AM

    I see from the information section that this coffee can be heated. Does that negatively impact the results of cold brewing at all? I do like a steaming cup of joe!

    Thanks, Dee

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 10:52 AM

    @Dee yeah, you can heat up cold brew, we will usually make it a little more concentrated by using less water during the brewing process, and then add hot water to it. you still get the benefits of the cold brewing process because you don't heat up the beans.

  • Gwen
    Gwen
    11/2/2015 10:55 AM

    So for us hot coffee fans (ice coffee is good - but not the same ahhhh it's morning experience when it's cold!), what do you recommend for heating and not burning?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 10:57 AM

    @Gwen I definitely know what you mean! we love our hot coffee too. If we want hot cold brew we will usually make a cold brew concentrate, then mix 50/50 with hot water from the kettle.

  • Lynn
    Lynn
    11/2/2015 11:06 AM

    In the video, it looks like there's a paper/filter on top of the coffee grounds, but the video doesn't mention a filter. Is a filter required, and if so, where would those be available?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 11:08 AM

    @Lynn yes, we use a paper filter on top of the coffee to help spread the water evenly. This is the same filter used in the aeropress, and can be found all over. Cold Bruer also comes with a pack of 100.

  • Cindy
    Cindy
    11/2/2015 11:06 AM

    I see that this comes with 100 paper filters--does this require a special filter to use, or will regular coffee filters work with it?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 11:11 AM

    @Cindy We recommend using Aeropress filters, they are a pretty standard and can be found all over.

  • Fred
    Fred
    11/2/2015 11:07 AM

    Seems very pricey compared to others I've seen.

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 11:15 AM

    Hi @Fred Cold Bruer uses the slow drip method instead of the more common full immersion method where you just put ground coffee in water and then manually filter it out later these products tend to be cheaper because the resulting coffee you get isn't as good, and they are usually made of plastic.

    Cold Bruer on the other hand comparatively makes a much cleaner cup of coffee with a lot more flavor clarity. It is also made with all high quality materials like borosilicate glass, stainless steel, and food grade silicone.

  • Saad
    Saad
    11/2/2015 11:30 AM

    Hello Andy ,

    Is this BPA free , Thanks

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 11:33 AM

    Hi @SAAD,

    yes, Cold Bruer is BPA free. We use all high quality materials including borosilicate glass, stainless steel, and food grade silicone. No plastic :)

  • MARTIN
    MARTIN
    11/2/2015 11:50 AM

    How many ounces in a full carafe?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 11:57 AM

    Hi @MARTIN,

    Cold Bruer can make up to 20 fluid ounces at a time.

  • Michelle
    Michelle
    11/2/2015 12:01 PM

    Does it come in other colors? If not, will you do other colors in the future..like black?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 12:02 PM

    @Michelle Only blue right now. We hope to have more colors soon.

  • Michelle
    Michelle
    11/2/2015 12:10 PM

    @Andy

    Will black be a definite option? I find this blue very off-putting.

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 12:39 PM

    @Michelle,

    Black is not a definite at this point, but we will definitely look into it.

  • Linda
    Linda
    11/2/2015 12:10 PM

    Hi! I LOVE cold brewing! I would like your input on how your Breuer differs from two other methods of cold coffee brewing that I have used.

    Years ago I purchased a cold brewer called a Toddy, which I absolutely hated. It was messy, ugly, and it didn't hold up in the long run because the glass part was thin and fragile. The brewing chamber was made of noxious plastic and I wasn't comfortable drinking coffee that had soaked in plastic for 12 hours. There were quality issues because the glass in the carafe was so thin that it broke within a week and I ended up brewing from the toddy brewing chamber into a glass mason jar. So I ditched it for a large, inexpensive french press - I just put in the required amount of grounds the night before and in the morning I plunge down the press for great coffee concentrate.. The french press is beautiful, and my brewing coffee only comes in contact with glass instead of plastic!

    Your unit looks like it addresses the issue of how ugly the Toddy was because this it a really attractive unit that I wouldn't mind seeing on my kitchen counter for a few hours every day. And from the video, it seems like it is clean and easy to get the grounds out without making a mess. Could you tell me how sturdy or thin the glass carafe is? And I am thinking that the brewing chamber is made of some kind of plastic or acrylic - is it BPA free? And how long does the brewing coffee come into contact with the plastic / acrylic brewing chamber? Are there any disposable parts to replace? My old Toddy had expensive filters that had to be replaced regularly.)

    Also, could you address the differences between brewing cold coffee in The Bruer as opposed to a French Press? I really love my French Press, but the glass is still super thin and I have been looking for something sturdier because it is so fragile that I know it will be broken soon or later! Is your carafe similar to a French Press or is it thick and sturdy like a mason jar?

    Thanks for any comments that compare and contrast the Breuer with the Toddy and the French Press!

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 12:34 PM

    Hi @Linda,

    Thanks for the questions. The two main components of Cold Bruer are borosilicate glass, which is a pretty durable material the same type of glass used in a french press. We have made it as thick as the manufacturing process allows, There is no plastic, so no BPA. Cold Bruer uses paper filters on top of the coffee to help disperse the water. These are common Aeropress filters, and can be found pretty easily (Cold Bruer also comes with 100 to start).

    As for the difference between Toddy/french press, they both are a method called full immersion, as you know with that method you put ground coffee in water, and then filter manually later. There are a couple advantages to Cold Bruer's slow drip method over full immersion. First once you set up Cold Bruer you don't need to remember to come back and filter the coffee as the slow drip process filters the coffee as it goes. You also get a much cleaner cup of coffee because the coffee isn't moving around and acts like its own filter, and with out all that extra sediment you increase the flavor clarity of the coffee.

  • Linda
    Linda
    11/2/2015 3:57 PM

    @Andy Thanks! Just to clarify, both the brewing chamber and the carafe are glass? That is awesome!

    Also, since you use filters, is there any issues with the filters clogging while the drip process is going on? My Toddy clogged horribly and it took sometimes 24 hours to finish. The french press never clogs, but there is some sediment that is left in the final product.

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    11/2/2015 5:25 PM

    Hi Linda, you shouldn't have any clogging trouble because it is the paper and coffee that serves as the filter, not a traditional filter. All residue will be left on the paper filter which makes for a very efficient clean-up process!

  • May
    May
    11/2/2015 12:11 PM

    I have to drink less coffee due to the acid so this process sounds good ...do you know If it would be OK to warm the coffee afterwards ...I need to drink warm coffee in the mornings

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    11/2/2015 12:29 PM

    Hi May, it will be more than OK! Andy said above he uses half cold water and half water from a kettle to get the best of both worlds. Your morning coffee needs will be met even more deliciously!

  • Lynnette
    Lynnette
    11/2/2015 12:31 PM

    All cold brewers I have owned used an expensive, hard to find, felt filter......what does this use?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 12:37 PM

    Hi @Lynnette,

    Cold Bruer uses a durable, and reusable stainless steel filter on the bottom. And aeropress paper filters on top to help disperse the water. Aeropress filters are pretty well priced. you can find 350 packs for under $5 all over.

  • Cheryl
    Cheryl
    11/2/2015 1:10 PM

    Is this the only size that you have for this product? Do you have one that could make 32 or 64 oz of iced coffee?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 1:12 PM

    @Cheryl Yeah, right now we only make Cold Bruer in one size.

  • Cheryl
    Cheryl
    11/2/2015 1:31 PM

    @Andy thanks, my husband drinks iced coffee like I drink iced sun tea in the summer so it would have been nice not to have to refill it more then once. You might want to consider a larger model.

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    11/2/2015 5:31 PM

    If it wasn't on their radar before, I'm sure it is now, Cheryl. Thanks for the suggestion!

  • Kathleen
    Kathleen
    11/2/2015 7:30 PM

    @Mike Would like to second the request for a larger size, hoping to bump it up in your priority :)

  • Jerry
    Jerry
    11/2/2015 1:24 PM

    The video shows you using ice water. I don't usually have ice around, and wondering if cold or room temperature water will work as well?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 1:35 PM

    @Jerry,

    Short Answer:

    Ice is not necessary for brewing. You just want to make sure the water temp stays constant, you can do that by using ice, brewing in the fridge, or using room temperature water.

    Long answer:

    We have found that some water sources contain more dissolved gasses then others, meaning there will be more air bubbles created, and those air bubbles can slow down the drip on Cold Bruer. But if you keep the water at a constant temperature those air bubbles form at a slower rate and wont effect the drip. So as long as you keep the temperature consistent you don't need to brew with ice.

  • Kirk
    Kirk
    11/2/2015 1:45 PM

    @Andy

    In your video you said you couldn't find an inexpensive cold brewer. Mine cost around $30, I brew a lb at a time , and it tastes just like the stuff I get at the coffee store which uses the big drip brewers like your process. So another $49 to make smaller batches I may not like any better just doesn't seem like enough of a reason to try this. and it's made in China. I might have been interested if it was made here and $30 cheaper.

  • RD
    RD
    11/2/2015 1:53 PM

    @Kirk What kind do you have?

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 1:58 PM

    Hi @Kirk,

    Thanks for the comment, Our process uses a slow drip process instead of the full immersion method that you are talking about. Other Cold brewers that use the slow drip method tend to be much more expensive ($200 +) .We personally like the flavor clarity and the clean cup this method produces, and that is why we decided to make a version that could be used at home.

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    11/2/2015 2:15 PM

    Kirk, you just can't beat that slow...

    Bruer

  • Andrew
    Andrew
    11/2/2015 2:17 PM

    @Mike take my money.

  • RD
    RD
    11/2/2015 1:53 PM

    What are you favorite grounds. Any suggestions for a non-coffee drinker who likes cold Starbucks Mocha drinks.

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 2:02 PM

    @RD we really like african coffees because they tend to have fruity and floral notes. If you are looking for chocolate notes I would recommend using a coffee from Latin America, this cold brewing process is great for pulling out those nutty and smooth chocolaty flavors!

  • Dan
    Dan
    11/2/2015 3:00 PM

    @RD Hey there, I'm a video producer at The Grommet, and fellow coffee fan. I'd highly suggest looking for a local coffee roaster and picking up a bag of their coffee that's been roasted in the past few days. Freshly roasted coffee can turn a non-coffee drinker into a coffee drinker, pretty quickly. Enjoy your coffee and good luck!

  • Randy
    Randy
    11/2/2015 9:05 PM

    Why not make it in the USA, China produces junk items.

  • Randy
    Randy
    11/2/2015 9:07 PM

    @Randy As an add on. You lost a sale.

  • Jules
    Jules – Grommet Team
    11/2/2015 9:28 PM

    @Randy We do not launch or support junk at Grommet. But every country is capable of producing inferior products, that's one thing we can agree on. Swing on over to our group of Made in USA products: https://www.thegrommet.com/made-in-the-usa I will be happy to see your support of those products too.

  • Andy
    Andy – Special Guest
    11/2/2015 10:17 PM

    @Randy Thanks for the question. Our main goal with Cold Bruer was to take the really awesome process of slow drip cold brewing that you can usually only find in high end coffee shops and make it available at an affordable price for home use. When we started out we looked into manufacturing in the united states, but were not able to find any factories that were able to produce our glass components at a price that would be reasonable to our customers. We spent a lot of time in China in order to find the best possible factories, and went through endless quality checks to make sure we produced the best product possible. We are very pleased with the quality of our product, and the price we are able to offer it at. I understand where your coming from, but unfortunately manufacturing Cold Bruer in the USA is not an option.

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