DIYogurt

With an automatic yogurt maker churning out custom batches, you’ll have a healthier alternative than most store-bought brands. Euro Cuisine’s machine is easy to use, and lets you control all the ingredients from the milk type to sweetness and thickness. Even though you’re in charge of the ingredients, you’re not exactly doing a lot of work. Start out with yogurt cultures or six ounces of fresh yogurt (which will have the cultures you need), and in six to ten hours you’ll have seven perfectly sized portions, divvied into lidded glass jars. Your all-natural, made-to-taste yogurt is packed with probiotics that help with digestion—but there’s no mystery ingredients or additives. Just pure, healthy yogurt—exactly how you like it.

Euro Cuisine

Digital Yogurt Maker

DIYogurt

With an automatic yogurt maker churning out custom batches, you’ll have a healthier alternative than most store-bought brands. Euro Cuisine’s machine is easy to use, and lets you control all the ingredients from the milk type to sweetness and thickness. Even though you’re in charge of the ingredients, you’re not exactly doing a lot of work. Start out with yogurt cultures or six ounces of fresh yogurt (which will have the cultures you need), and in six to ten hours you’ll have seven perfectly sized portions, divvied into lidded glass jars. Your all-natural, made-to-taste yogurt is packed with probiotics that help with digestion—but there’s no mystery ingredients or additives. Just pure, healthy yogurt—exactly how you like it.
Sustainable Living

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Jack
    Jack

    Hello everyone! I'm proud to introduce our Automatic Yogurt Maker to The Grommet. I'd be happy to answer any questions you may have!

  • Ginny
    Ginny
    2/23/2017 10:56 AM

    Do you have to boil the milk first, or does the Yogurt Maker take care of that step?

  • Heidi
    Heidi
    2/23/2017 1:58 PM

    @Ginny You have to heat the milk first. Here is a manual from a similar machine:

    http://eurocuisine.net/manuals/EYM80-1.pdf

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 2:05 PM

    Thanks, Heidi!

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 2:44 PM

    It is best that you heat up the milk to 180F and then cool to 100F before you add the yogurt starter. You heat because you want to kill any an all bacteria that is in the milk to allow the yogurt bacteria to grow.

  • Martha
    Martha
    2/23/2017 11:02 AM

    This is great timing! I've begun purchasing his & her's tubs of yogurt as my husband likes to mix in the separated water back into the yogurt, while I like to pour it out. Now we can each make our own. Can you tell me, why does yogurt separate? Will our home made yogurt separate as well?

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 11:51 AM

    Hi Martha, thanks for the question. That is a natural process of the solids separating from the liquids. That liquid is whey. Because the yogurt you make with Euro Cuisine will likely be consumed fresh or close to it, you may start eating it before that process takes place. So while the whey will still be there, it will have the consistency of a yogurt you have already stirred up or drained depending on how you like it.

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 2:48 PM

    As you move from whole milk to non fat milk you would get some separation because whole milk is a balance milk and non fat milk has more water in it than milk solid- Milk solid becomes yogurt and the water become the whey. You can either strain it to get thicker yogurt called Greek Yogurt or you can mix it to have a softer yogurt. There is a lot of nutrient in the whey as well.

  • Guest
    Guest
    2/23/2017 11:16 AM

    I see the starter contains sucrose. Are we able to use another starter that doesn't contain table sugar? I don't like to eat sugar.

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 11:47 AM

    Hi, yes, you can use your own culture to get started.

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 2:49 PM

    you can also use plain yogurt as starter.

  • Wilhelmina
    Wilhelmina
    2/23/2017 11:20 AM

    Can you use goat milk? Hemp milk? Almond milk? Cashew milk? to make yogurt

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 11:47 AM

    Hi Wilhelmina, yes, you can customize which milk you use for Euro Cuisine.

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 2:51 PM

    Almond, Coconut, Rice, Soy Milk

    You can achieve making yogurt with plain Almond, Coconut, Rice, and Soy Milk. Please choose the type that is in the non-refrigerated section of you super market and make sure that there is at least 6gr per serving of sugar in the milk. Your milk should be plain with no flavoring. Sugar is food for the bacteria. If not enough then add sugar or pasteurized honey to it. Follow the same instruction as for the regular milk. Please note that with this type of milk you might get water separation. The water in the milk becomes the whey and the solid become the yogurt. You can either top off the whey or mix for softer yogurt.

    With goat milk you would get a softer yogurt as there is an enzyme in the goat milk that does not allow to get firm. You always strain it to get firmer yogurt.

  • Patricia
    Patricia
    2/23/2017 11:27 AM

    Can you buy more jars? Between my husband and daughter I feel like we'd go through this in two days... And how long does one batch take to make?

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 11:46 AM

    Hi Patricia, we do not have specific Euro Cuisine jars being sold separately, but you might be able to get away with using your own 6 oz glass jars. The yogurt takes about 6-10 hours to make.

  • Rachel
    Rachel
    2/23/2017 11:35 AM

    Is the consistency like Greek yogurt, or thinner? thx.

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 11:44 AM

    Hi Rachel, one of the great things about Euro Cuisine is yu can control the thickness to your own preference.

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 2:54 PM

    You can control the thickness by the type of milk that you use. Whole milk gives you a thicker yogurt vs a non fat milk.

    If you want Greek yogurt then you have to take one more step. Greek Yogurt is Yogurt minus the Whey. So strain it to get Greek yogurt.

  • Lisa
    Lisa
    2/23/2017 11:59 AM

    I would like to see the instructions on how to make the yogurt before buying. Can you please provide? Also, what yogurt are you using to 'start' the process?

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 1:04 PM

    Hi Lisa, our video can help get you started as for the actual yogurt, you can purchase starter cultures for the yogurt right here on site.

  • Travis
    Travis
    2/23/2017 11:59 AM

    Two questions. First, how big are the jars (in terms of how much yogurt they hold)? Second, how much of the culture do you need for each jar? I'm trying to figure out how many jars the 10-packet culture kit would make. Thanks!

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 1:12 PM

    Hi Travis, two answers. First, each jar is 6 oz. Second, each pouch makes 126 fluid oz.

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 2:56 PM

    You would need 1 - 5gr packet per 42oz milk to make your first batch. Then you would use the already make yogurt to make your second batch and third batch.

  • Cynthia
    Cynthia
    2/23/2017 12:05 PM

    How does this system bypass the need to (almost) boil the milk and then cool to 100 degrees before adding the yogurt culture? I thought that, while forgiving, this was an important step to making fresh yogurt.

  • Linda
    Linda
    2/23/2017 1:34 PM

    @Cynthia - it does not eliminate the need to heat the milk. This is not a new product. I bought mine at Williams-Sonoma about 2 years ago. It says in the directions that you need to heat the milk to 170. Even that is not enough. If you don't bring it to a boil, you end up with a thin, runny product that does not resemble yogurt. That said - I use this every week to make 7 jars of yogurt. It takes some trial and error to work out the kinks, but I get good results about 90% of the time

  • Lorene
    Lorene
    2/23/2017 12:09 PM

    Would this be like sourdough starter where you can use the current yogurt as starter for the new yogurt? It would be pricey to have to use the packaged culture each time.

  • Francie
    Francie
    2/23/2017 1:16 PM

    @Lorene Yes

  • Mary Beth
    Mary Beth
    2/23/2017 12:25 PM

    I'm also interested in seeing the instruction & recipe book prior to purchase. I'm in a group of over 30,000 bariatric patients. If this is easy to use and produces superior products then you have a GIANT market.

  • Heidi
    Heidi
    2/23/2017 2:01 PM

    @Mary Beth If not the exact same model, this would be very similar and would give you an idea.

    http://eurocuisine.net/manuals/EYM80-1.pdf

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 2:05 PM

    Thanks again, Heidi!

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 2:59 PM

    here is the actual instruction book to this model YMX650

    http://www.eurocuisine.net/manuals/EYMX650.pdf

  • Kate
    Kate
    2/23/2017 12:32 PM

    Hello, This looks great. Just how many grams of sucrose would there be in each jar? And when you say that I can use my own starter, do I just use my favorite yogurt as a starter.

    Thanks!

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 4:13 PM

    The amount of sugar depends on the type of milk that you use- Look at the nutritional fact of the milk to get that information.

  • Dee
    Dee
    2/23/2017 2:47 PM

    Hello!

    I have owned the Euro Cuisine YM80 model for about a year and have been happily making yogurt weekly with it for many months now. I would love to purchase a yogurt maker for my niece as a graduation gift, but would like to know how this model differs from mine.

    A couple more quick questions... I have the stacking unit that enables me to put a second tier on my YM80. Does that stacker work on this model too? I like to drain my yogurt to 'greek' it so I don't use the small glass jars, I use one big glass bowl. Do you sell one or have info on what size bowl would fit in this unit if someone wanted to do just one big batch? Finally, how does this model allow for options in thickness and do those options affect the tartness level?

    Having been very happy with my Euro Cuisine yogurt maker I'm glad to see this vendor on The Grommet and hope people will give it a chance. Homemade yogurt is delicious, easy and frugal!

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 4:14 PM

    The YM80 model has just an on/ff switch and the individual glass jars has just a plain white lid.

    This Model YMX650 - Has a 15 hours automatic Digital Timer that shows how long it is left to the end of the process and the unit will turn off automatically and beeps 5 times to notify you that the process has ended. The lids to the individual glass jars has a date setting feature on it, that you can set to remind yourself as to the date that you have made the yogurt.

    This Model YMX650 - Has also a compartment on top of the clear lid that would allow you to store the glass jar lids during the incubation process.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

Euro Cuisine

Digital Yogurt Maker

DIYogurt

With an automatic yogurt maker churning out custom batches, you’ll have a healthier alternative than most store-bought brands.

Euro Cuisine’s machine is easy to use, and lets you control all the ingredients from the milk type to sweetness and thickness.

Even though you’re in charge of the ingredients, you’re not exactly doing a
lot of work. Start out with yogurt cultures or six ounces of fresh yogurt (which will have the cultures you need), and in six to ten hours you’ll have seven perfectly sized portions, divvied into lidded glass jars.

Your all-natural, made-to-taste yogurt is packed with probiotics that help with digestion—but there’s no mystery ingredients or additives. Just pure, healthy yogurt—exactly how you like it.
Read More Read Less
DIYogurt.

To Go With Euro Cuisine

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Jack
    Jack

    Hello everyone! I'm proud to introduce our Automatic Yogurt Maker to The Grommet. I'd be happy to answer any questions you may have!

  • Ginny
    Ginny
    2/23/2017 10:56 AM

    Do you have to boil the milk first, or does the Yogurt Maker take care of that step?

  • Heidi
    Heidi
    2/23/2017 1:58 PM

    @Ginny You have to heat the milk first. Here is a manual from a similar machine:

    http://eurocuisine.net/manuals/EYM80-1.pdf

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 2:05 PM

    Thanks, Heidi!

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 2:44 PM

    It is best that you heat up the milk to 180F and then cool to 100F before you add the yogurt starter. You heat because you want to kill any an all bacteria that is in the milk to allow the yogurt bacteria to grow.

  • Martha
    Martha
    2/23/2017 11:02 AM

    This is great timing! I've begun purchasing his & her's tubs of yogurt as my husband likes to mix in the separated water back into the yogurt, while I like to pour it out. Now we can each make our own. Can you tell me, why does yogurt separate? Will our home made yogurt separate as well?

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 11:51 AM

    Hi Martha, thanks for the question. That is a natural process of the solids separating from the liquids. That liquid is whey. Because the yogurt you make with Euro Cuisine will likely be consumed fresh or close to it, you may start eating it before that process takes place. So while the whey will still be there, it will have the consistency of a yogurt you have already stirred up or drained depending on how you like it.

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 2:48 PM

    As you move from whole milk to non fat milk you would get some separation because whole milk is a balance milk and non fat milk has more water in it than milk solid- Milk solid becomes yogurt and the water become the whey. You can either strain it to get thicker yogurt called Greek Yogurt or you can mix it to have a softer yogurt. There is a lot of nutrient in the whey as well.

  • Guest
    Guest
    2/23/2017 11:16 AM

    I see the starter contains sucrose. Are we able to use another starter that doesn't contain table sugar? I don't like to eat sugar.

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 11:47 AM

    Hi, yes, you can use your own culture to get started.

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 2:49 PM

    you can also use plain yogurt as starter.

  • Wilhelmina
    Wilhelmina
    2/23/2017 11:20 AM

    Can you use goat milk? Hemp milk? Almond milk? Cashew milk? to make yogurt

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 11:47 AM

    Hi Wilhelmina, yes, you can customize which milk you use for Euro Cuisine.

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 2:51 PM

    Almond, Coconut, Rice, Soy Milk

    You can achieve making yogurt with plain Almond, Coconut, Rice, and Soy Milk. Please choose the type that is in the non-refrigerated section of you super market and make sure that there is at least 6gr per serving of sugar in the milk. Your milk should be plain with no flavoring. Sugar is food for the bacteria. If not enough then add sugar or pasteurized honey to it. Follow the same instruction as for the regular milk. Please note that with this type of milk you might get water separation. The water in the milk becomes the whey and the solid become the yogurt. You can either top off the whey or mix for softer yogurt.

    With goat milk you would get a softer yogurt as there is an enzyme in the goat milk that does not allow to get firm. You always strain it to get firmer yogurt.

  • Patricia
    Patricia
    2/23/2017 11:27 AM

    Can you buy more jars? Between my husband and daughter I feel like we'd go through this in two days... And how long does one batch take to make?

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 11:46 AM

    Hi Patricia, we do not have specific Euro Cuisine jars being sold separately, but you might be able to get away with using your own 6 oz glass jars. The yogurt takes about 6-10 hours to make.

  • Rachel
    Rachel
    2/23/2017 11:35 AM

    Is the consistency like Greek yogurt, or thinner? thx.

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 11:44 AM

    Hi Rachel, one of the great things about Euro Cuisine is yu can control the thickness to your own preference.

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 2:54 PM

    You can control the thickness by the type of milk that you use. Whole milk gives you a thicker yogurt vs a non fat milk.

    If you want Greek yogurt then you have to take one more step. Greek Yogurt is Yogurt minus the Whey. So strain it to get Greek yogurt.

  • Lisa
    Lisa
    2/23/2017 11:59 AM

    I would like to see the instructions on how to make the yogurt before buying. Can you please provide? Also, what yogurt are you using to 'start' the process?

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 1:04 PM

    Hi Lisa, our video can help get you started as for the actual yogurt, you can purchase starter cultures for the yogurt right here on site.

  • Travis
    Travis
    2/23/2017 11:59 AM

    Two questions. First, how big are the jars (in terms of how much yogurt they hold)? Second, how much of the culture do you need for each jar? I'm trying to figure out how many jars the 10-packet culture kit would make. Thanks!

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 1:12 PM

    Hi Travis, two answers. First, each jar is 6 oz. Second, each pouch makes 126 fluid oz.

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 2:56 PM

    You would need 1 - 5gr packet per 42oz milk to make your first batch. Then you would use the already make yogurt to make your second batch and third batch.

  • Cynthia
    Cynthia
    2/23/2017 12:05 PM

    How does this system bypass the need to (almost) boil the milk and then cool to 100 degrees before adding the yogurt culture? I thought that, while forgiving, this was an important step to making fresh yogurt.

  • Linda
    Linda
    2/23/2017 1:34 PM

    @Cynthia - it does not eliminate the need to heat the milk. This is not a new product. I bought mine at Williams-Sonoma about 2 years ago. It says in the directions that you need to heat the milk to 170. Even that is not enough. If you don't bring it to a boil, you end up with a thin, runny product that does not resemble yogurt. That said - I use this every week to make 7 jars of yogurt. It takes some trial and error to work out the kinks, but I get good results about 90% of the time

  • Lorene
    Lorene
    2/23/2017 12:09 PM

    Would this be like sourdough starter where you can use the current yogurt as starter for the new yogurt? It would be pricey to have to use the packaged culture each time.

  • Francie
    Francie
    2/23/2017 1:16 PM

    @Lorene Yes

  • Mary Beth
    Mary Beth
    2/23/2017 12:25 PM

    I'm also interested in seeing the instruction & recipe book prior to purchase. I'm in a group of over 30,000 bariatric patients. If this is easy to use and produces superior products then you have a GIANT market.

  • Heidi
    Heidi
    2/23/2017 2:01 PM

    @Mary Beth If not the exact same model, this would be very similar and would give you an idea.

    http://eurocuisine.net/manuals/EYM80-1.pdf

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    2/23/2017 2:05 PM

    Thanks again, Heidi!

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 2:59 PM

    here is the actual instruction book to this model YMX650

    http://www.eurocuisine.net/manuals/EYMX650.pdf

  • Kate
    Kate
    2/23/2017 12:32 PM

    Hello, This looks great. Just how many grams of sucrose would there be in each jar? And when you say that I can use my own starter, do I just use my favorite yogurt as a starter.

    Thanks!

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 4:13 PM

    The amount of sugar depends on the type of milk that you use- Look at the nutritional fact of the milk to get that information.

  • Dee
    Dee
    2/23/2017 2:47 PM

    Hello!

    I have owned the Euro Cuisine YM80 model for about a year and have been happily making yogurt weekly with it for many months now. I would love to purchase a yogurt maker for my niece as a graduation gift, but would like to know how this model differs from mine.

    A couple more quick questions... I have the stacking unit that enables me to put a second tier on my YM80. Does that stacker work on this model too? I like to drain my yogurt to 'greek' it so I don't use the small glass jars, I use one big glass bowl. Do you sell one or have info on what size bowl would fit in this unit if someone wanted to do just one big batch? Finally, how does this model allow for options in thickness and do those options affect the tartness level?

    Having been very happy with my Euro Cuisine yogurt maker I'm glad to see this vendor on The Grommet and hope people will give it a chance. Homemade yogurt is delicious, easy and frugal!

  • Jack
    Jack – Special Guest
    2/23/2017 4:14 PM

    The YM80 model has just an on/ff switch and the individual glass jars has just a plain white lid.

    This Model YMX650 - Has a 15 hours automatic Digital Timer that shows how long it is left to the end of the process and the unit will turn off automatically and beeps 5 times to notify you that the process has ended. The lids to the individual glass jars has a date setting feature on it, that you can set to remind yourself as to the date that you have made the yogurt.

    This Model YMX650 - Has also a compartment on top of the clear lid that would allow you to store the glass jar lids during the incubation process.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.