Rockin’ Utensils

Ah, the travails of middle school. Making friends, keeping up with schoolwork, trying to eat a pizza in mixed company without making a fool of yourself. That last challenge in particular was a tough one for Mike Miller, who wanted to eat pizza neatly with a fork while trying to impress some young ladies. But it’s not an easy task, and he wound up wishing for a fork-like utensil that incorporated the functionality of the snazzy pizza cutter. Fast forward about a decade, and Mike has invented just such a thing. Mike left medical school to devote his energy to designing the Knork he envisioned so many years earlier. He observed the way people eat and engineered a curved, beveled edge and subtle fingertip platform below the tines that gives you leverage when you’re using a rocking motion to cut through foods. The Knork is not meant to replace the knife, but rather work as a better performing fork. These modifications better support the maneuvering we try to do with the standard fork. They even enable a user to both cut and spear food using one utensil and one hand. Knorks come in stainless steel and plastic versions. The plastic Knorks are ideal for cocktail parties and other events that call for standing, balancing a plate of food, and trying to eat without making an embarrassing mess. It’s like middle school all over again—but now there’s a better utensil option.

Knork

The Fork, Reinvented

Rockin’ Utensils

Ah, the travails of middle school. Making friends, keeping up with schoolwork, trying to eat a pizza in mixed company without making a fool of yourself. That last challenge in particular was a tough one for Mike Miller, who wanted to eat pizza neatly with a fork while trying to impress some young ladies. But it’s not an easy task, and he wound up wishing for a fork-like utensil that incorporated the functionality of the snazzy pizza cutter. Fast forward about a decade, and Mike has invented just such a thing. Mike left medical school to devote his energy to designing the Knork he envisioned so many years earlier. He observed the way people eat and engineered a curved, beveled edge and subtle fingertip platform below the tines that gives you leverage when you’re using a rocking motion to cut through foods. The Knork is not meant to replace the knife, but rather work as a better performing fork. These modifications better support the maneuvering we try to do with the standard fork. They even enable a user to both cut and spear food using one utensil and one hand. Knorks come in stainless steel and plastic versions. The plastic Knorks are ideal for cocktail parties and other events that call for standing, balancing a plate of food, and trying to eat without making an embarrassing mess. It’s like middle school all over again—but now there’s a better utensil option.

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Mike
    Mike

    Knock Knock…Who’s There? The Knork Dork, and I am honored that the Daily Grommet has chosen to feature my journey as today's Grommet. How many times have you sat down to eat something, picked up a fork and tried to cut your food realizing that all you’re doing is smashing your food and creating a very sore finger? I, too, had this problem in the eighth grade while eating pizza and finally decided to do something about it. I’m live and online and ready to answer any questions you may have about my journey with the Knork or just stop by and say hi!

  • js
    js
    8/9/2011 12:14 PM

    How sharp is the edge of this fork? I'm imagining a risk to cutting my lip or tongue when I eat the food off of the knork.

  • Julia
    Julia – Grommet Team
    8/9/2011 12:40 PM

    @js: Nope, not to worry. The sides of the Knork are not sharp. They do not have knife-like edges, yet because of their heft and curvature you can rock the Knork to cut your food. This utensil does not replace the knife, just better supports the natural way we operate our forks.

  • Ginny Markowski
    Ginny Markowski
    8/9/2011 12:14 PM

    Would the "cutting" edge be a problem for a young child or elderly person if he puts the whole thing in his mouth?

  • Mike
    Mike – Special Guest
    8/9/2011 1:07 PM

    @Ginny Markowski: The cutting edge of the knork is not sharp enough to cut the user. It is more of a beveled edge not sharp. Because of the rounded beveled edge and the finger platform, the knork allows the user to cut food with ease.

  • Laura Lawhon
    Laura Lawhon
    8/9/2011 12:33 PM

    I really like this as a solution for my stroke, head injury and upper extremity amputee patients who have one functional hand! But of course, need to make sure it is not TOO sharp. I assume it's like a butter knife edge, instead of the blunt edge usually found on the tines of a fork. Maybe include a model with built-up handle for improved grasp, and it would be great to see in rehab equipment catalogs!

  • Julia
    Julia – Grommet Team
    8/9/2011 2:24 PM

    @Laura Lawhon: Great Point. The design is really universal and inclusive. I have heard the Knork team say that these are popular among people who have suffered a stroke and have more limited movement. They are not sharp, so they are suitable for kids that are old enough to use a regular fork and for your patients. Good idea about the rehabilitation version.

  • Am
    Am
    8/9/2011 12:48 PM

    Is this fork useable for right and left handed people?

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    8/9/2011 1:03 PM

    @Am: Yes!

  • Sue Epstein
    Sue Epstein
    8/9/2011 12:55 PM

    I have a set of Knorks, and they work as advertised. Two caveats - they're HEAVY. And the knife doesn't have a serrated edge, which would make it far more useable.

  • Mike
    Mike – Special Guest
    8/9/2011 1:15 PM

    @Sue Epstein: The knife that is included with the set was designed more as a butter knife that can be used to cut other foods as well if needed. We did not include a serrated edge on this knife, instead we came out with a line of steak knives that are once again designed with the user in mind.

  • Margaret K.
    Margaret K.
    8/9/2011 1:23 PM

    Love this idea! And the design is actually lovely to look at as well. My questions: What is the composition of the plastic Knorks? Are they reusable, washable utensils? Or are they intended to be disposable?

    Thanks in advance!

  • Margaret K.
    Margaret K.
    8/9/2011 1:25 PM

    @Margaret K.: Note to self - read the details! I see they are washable and reusable. Sorry Mike, for not reading that first. So, what is the plastic composition please?

  • Mike
    Mike – Special Guest
    8/9/2011 1:39 PM

    @Margaret K.: You are correct, the plastic knorks are dishwasher safe and reusable. The plastic knorks are composed of a strong polystyrene plastic. This type of plastic is very strong, and allows the knork to work properly to still cut your food.

  • Lara Lucas
    Lara Lucas
    8/9/2011 1:46 PM

    Hi Mike,

    Great idea! Where are the knorks and other utensils manufactured? Thanks

  • Mike
    Mike – Special Guest
    8/9/2011 1:59 PM

    @Lara Lucas: Most of out products are actually manufactured overseas in China, then we bring them back to our facility and inspect and package them. However, we have been able to bring some of our plastic lines back to the states and manufacture them here in Kansas.

  • Rich MacKinnon
    Rich MacKinnon
    8/10/2011 2:50 AM

    As my wife only has use of 1 hand, the Knork is a lifesaver! It combines the curve of a rocker-knife, yet is perfectly suited for the one-handed person. In fact even the able-bodied people here love it!

    I bought a set of 4, that came with 4 of their plastic ones; I honestly believe that 2 of the stainless steel ones were "borrowed" by my daughter's friends.

    Heavy- no, HEFTY- durable and practical, the Knork is the best eating utensil out there. And would be the PERFECT GIFT for a person who has lost the use of one hand- like a young Iraq/Afghan Wounded Warrior. Get one and have it engraved with their name and unit..or something. It really helps restore personal idependence with eating!

    Trust me- I'm a retired military healthcare provider with over 27 years of experience, as well as 27 years of marriage to a tri-plegic wife. This Knork rocks!

    Doc MacKinnon

  • Michelle
    Michelle
    8/17/2011 1:31 PM

    @Rich MacKinnon: What an inspiring review! I love my Knorks and have told my physical therapist friends to spread the word to their patients.

  • Mary Ann Langston
    Mary Ann Langston
    8/12/2011 3:50 AM

    Looking for Made in American products. Hopefully, you can have all the utentils made in the USA.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    8/12/2011 10:37 AM

    @Mary Ann Langston: I know he'll keep searching for that possibility.

  • Mimi
    Mimi
    10/28/2011 5:40 PM

    @Mary Ann Langston:

    I agree...I am very concerned about the future of American businesses. I would buy this product, if it was made in America. That's the problem these days...companies want to go overseas to squeeze out all profits & cut out the American worker, whom they want to buy their overly inflated products produced in China. Smh...

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    10/28/2011 6:39 PM

    @Mimi: We love supporting products that are made in the USA and Knork, as Mike mentions, has been able to bring some of their production back to the US. We have learned, through many Grommets, that there are often other factors at work as to why a startup company cannot manufacture in the US, and it usually doesn't boil down to greed. They would love to have their products manufactured locally but it simply isn't possible. We are all hoping that this trend reverses.

  • Sharon Broyles
    Sharon Broyles
    11/5/2011 8:52 AM

    @Katherine Klinger: I too am looking for products made in the USA. I love the idea of the Knork and it's style. I am looking for a new set of silverware and will keep an eye out for the day they are manufactured in the USA. Thanks fpr a great new idea.

  • Lynn Solomon
    Lynn Solomon
    8/12/2011 2:40 PM

    Do you make them for lefties or do you plan to??

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    8/12/2011 2:42 PM

    Good news Lynn! The same Knork will work for a lefty or a righty.

  • Kelly
    Kelly
    11/13/2011 11:44 AM

    What is the weight of each utensil? People who suffer from tremors sometimes require the use of weighted utensils while eating.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/13/2011 2:48 PM

    @Kelly: Great question. I will find out and let you know.

  • Rochelle
    Rochelle
    12/30/2011 3:24 AM

    @Katherine Klinger: It's been a month-and-a-half, and I'm curious to know if you found out the weight of each piece yet? I'm planning on buying a couple of your 20-pc sets soon. Thanks.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    12/30/2011 10:23 AM

    @Rochelle: I apologize, I have found out the weight to be 78.4 grams/2.8 oz. I hope that this is a good weight for your use.

  •  Tish
    Tish
    11/3/2012 1:34 PM

    I like the idea but where are the knorks for left-handers?

  • Jim Anderson
    Jim Anderson
    11/3/2012 5:04 PM

    @ Tish: They are ambidextrous and work for normal people and us lefties..

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

Knork

The Fork, Reinvented

Rockin’ Utensils

Ah, the travails of middle school. Making friends, keeping up with schoolwork, trying to eat a pizza in mixed company without making a fool of yourself. That last challenge in particular was a tough one for Mike Miller, who wanted to eat pizza neatly with a fork while trying to impress some young ladies. But it’s not an easy task, and he wound up wishing for a fork-like utensil that incorporated the functionality of the snazzy pizza cutter. Fast forward about a decade, and Mike has invented just such a thing.

Mike
left medical school to devote his energy to designing the Knork he envisioned so many years earlier. He observed the way people eat and engineered a curved, beveled edge and subtle fingertip platform below the tines that gives you leverage when you’re using a rocking motion to cut through foods. The Knork is not meant to replace the knife, but rather work as a better performing fork. These modifications better support the maneuvering we try to do with the standard fork. They even enable a user to both cut and spear food using one utensil and one hand.

Knorks come in stainless steel and plastic versions. The plastic Knorks are ideal for cocktail parties and other events that call for standing, balancing a plate of food, and trying to eat without making an embarrassing mess. It’s like middle school all over again—but now there’s a better utensil option.
Read More Read Less
Knork - the fork reinvented

Shop Knork Products

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Mike
    Mike

    Knock Knock…Who’s There? The Knork Dork, and I am honored that the Daily Grommet has chosen to feature my journey as today's Grommet. How many times have you sat down to eat something, picked up a fork and tried to cut your food realizing that all you’re doing is smashing your food and creating a very sore finger? I, too, had this problem in the eighth grade while eating pizza and finally decided to do something about it. I’m live and online and ready to answer any questions you may have about my journey with the Knork or just stop by and say hi!

  • js
    js
    8/9/2011 12:14 PM

    How sharp is the edge of this fork? I'm imagining a risk to cutting my lip or tongue when I eat the food off of the knork.

  • Julia
    Julia – Grommet Team
    8/9/2011 12:40 PM

    @js: Nope, not to worry. The sides of the Knork are not sharp. They do not have knife-like edges, yet because of their heft and curvature you can rock the Knork to cut your food. This utensil does not replace the knife, just better supports the natural way we operate our forks.

  • Ginny Markowski
    Ginny Markowski
    8/9/2011 12:14 PM

    Would the "cutting" edge be a problem for a young child or elderly person if he puts the whole thing in his mouth?

  • Mike
    Mike – Special Guest
    8/9/2011 1:07 PM

    @Ginny Markowski: The cutting edge of the knork is not sharp enough to cut the user. It is more of a beveled edge not sharp. Because of the rounded beveled edge and the finger platform, the knork allows the user to cut food with ease.

  • Laura Lawhon
    Laura Lawhon
    8/9/2011 12:33 PM

    I really like this as a solution for my stroke, head injury and upper extremity amputee patients who have one functional hand! But of course, need to make sure it is not TOO sharp. I assume it's like a butter knife edge, instead of the blunt edge usually found on the tines of a fork. Maybe include a model with built-up handle for improved grasp, and it would be great to see in rehab equipment catalogs!

  • Julia
    Julia – Grommet Team
    8/9/2011 2:24 PM

    @Laura Lawhon: Great Point. The design is really universal and inclusive. I have heard the Knork team say that these are popular among people who have suffered a stroke and have more limited movement. They are not sharp, so they are suitable for kids that are old enough to use a regular fork and for your patients. Good idea about the rehabilitation version.

  • Am
    Am
    8/9/2011 12:48 PM

    Is this fork useable for right and left handed people?

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    8/9/2011 1:03 PM

    @Am: Yes!

  • Sue Epstein
    Sue Epstein
    8/9/2011 12:55 PM

    I have a set of Knorks, and they work as advertised. Two caveats - they're HEAVY. And the knife doesn't have a serrated edge, which would make it far more useable.

  • Mike
    Mike – Special Guest
    8/9/2011 1:15 PM

    @Sue Epstein: The knife that is included with the set was designed more as a butter knife that can be used to cut other foods as well if needed. We did not include a serrated edge on this knife, instead we came out with a line of steak knives that are once again designed with the user in mind.

  • Margaret K.
    Margaret K.
    8/9/2011 1:23 PM

    Love this idea! And the design is actually lovely to look at as well. My questions: What is the composition of the plastic Knorks? Are they reusable, washable utensils? Or are they intended to be disposable?

    Thanks in advance!

  • Margaret K.
    Margaret K.
    8/9/2011 1:25 PM

    @Margaret K.: Note to self - read the details! I see they are washable and reusable. Sorry Mike, for not reading that first. So, what is the plastic composition please?

  • Mike
    Mike – Special Guest
    8/9/2011 1:39 PM

    @Margaret K.: You are correct, the plastic knorks are dishwasher safe and reusable. The plastic knorks are composed of a strong polystyrene plastic. This type of plastic is very strong, and allows the knork to work properly to still cut your food.

  • Lara Lucas
    Lara Lucas
    8/9/2011 1:46 PM

    Hi Mike,

    Great idea! Where are the knorks and other utensils manufactured? Thanks

  • Mike
    Mike – Special Guest
    8/9/2011 1:59 PM

    @Lara Lucas: Most of out products are actually manufactured overseas in China, then we bring them back to our facility and inspect and package them. However, we have been able to bring some of our plastic lines back to the states and manufacture them here in Kansas.

  • Rich MacKinnon
    Rich MacKinnon
    8/10/2011 2:50 AM

    As my wife only has use of 1 hand, the Knork is a lifesaver! It combines the curve of a rocker-knife, yet is perfectly suited for the one-handed person. In fact even the able-bodied people here love it!

    I bought a set of 4, that came with 4 of their plastic ones; I honestly believe that 2 of the stainless steel ones were "borrowed" by my daughter's friends.

    Heavy- no, HEFTY- durable and practical, the Knork is the best eating utensil out there. And would be the PERFECT GIFT for a person who has lost the use of one hand- like a young Iraq/Afghan Wounded Warrior. Get one and have it engraved with their name and unit..or something. It really helps restore personal idependence with eating!

    Trust me- I'm a retired military healthcare provider with over 27 years of experience, as well as 27 years of marriage to a tri-plegic wife. This Knork rocks!

    Doc MacKinnon

  • Michelle
    Michelle
    8/17/2011 1:31 PM

    @Rich MacKinnon: What an inspiring review! I love my Knorks and have told my physical therapist friends to spread the word to their patients.

  • Mary Ann Langston
    Mary Ann Langston
    8/12/2011 3:50 AM

    Looking for Made in American products. Hopefully, you can have all the utentils made in the USA.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    8/12/2011 10:37 AM

    @Mary Ann Langston: I know he'll keep searching for that possibility.

  • Mimi
    Mimi
    10/28/2011 5:40 PM

    @Mary Ann Langston:

    I agree...I am very concerned about the future of American businesses. I would buy this product, if it was made in America. That's the problem these days...companies want to go overseas to squeeze out all profits & cut out the American worker, whom they want to buy their overly inflated products produced in China. Smh...

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    10/28/2011 6:39 PM

    @Mimi: We love supporting products that are made in the USA and Knork, as Mike mentions, has been able to bring some of their production back to the US. We have learned, through many Grommets, that there are often other factors at work as to why a startup company cannot manufacture in the US, and it usually doesn't boil down to greed. They would love to have their products manufactured locally but it simply isn't possible. We are all hoping that this trend reverses.

  • Sharon Broyles
    Sharon Broyles
    11/5/2011 8:52 AM

    @Katherine Klinger: I too am looking for products made in the USA. I love the idea of the Knork and it's style. I am looking for a new set of silverware and will keep an eye out for the day they are manufactured in the USA. Thanks fpr a great new idea.

  • Lynn Solomon
    Lynn Solomon
    8/12/2011 2:40 PM

    Do you make them for lefties or do you plan to??

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    8/12/2011 2:42 PM

    Good news Lynn! The same Knork will work for a lefty or a righty.

  • Kelly
    Kelly
    11/13/2011 11:44 AM

    What is the weight of each utensil? People who suffer from tremors sometimes require the use of weighted utensils while eating.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/13/2011 2:48 PM

    @Kelly: Great question. I will find out and let you know.

  • Rochelle
    Rochelle
    12/30/2011 3:24 AM

    @Katherine Klinger: It's been a month-and-a-half, and I'm curious to know if you found out the weight of each piece yet? I'm planning on buying a couple of your 20-pc sets soon. Thanks.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    12/30/2011 10:23 AM

    @Rochelle: I apologize, I have found out the weight to be 78.4 grams/2.8 oz. I hope that this is a good weight for your use.

  •  Tish
    Tish
    11/3/2012 1:34 PM

    I like the idea but where are the knorks for left-handers?

  • Jim Anderson
    Jim Anderson
    11/3/2012 5:04 PM

    @ Tish: They are ambidextrous and work for normal people and us lefties..

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.