Vocabulary + Strategy

Thirteen lettered tiles. Sixty seconds. Go! Find as many words as you can in Lexigo RUSH, a head-to-head game of stringing letters together. Arrange the tiles into a honeycomb-shaped game grid, start the timer, and the rush is on. Form words letter-by-letter along a continuous path, but work fast and get creative because only words no other player has earn points. To up the challenge, Maker Wiggles 3D (creator of Randomonium) added a few twists. The same tile can be used twice in a sequence. And blank tiles are a wild card, representing any letter a player needs. With three sixty-second rounds per game, the stakes rise in each. Bonus brackets are placed on certain letters. Any word using a bracketed letter earns double points. This entertaining, educational new take on linguistic competition is, in a word, fun.

Lexigo RUSH

Twisty Word Game

Vocabulary + Strategy

Thirteen lettered tiles. Sixty seconds. Go! Find as many words as you can in Lexigo RUSH, a head-to-head game of stringing letters together. Arrange the tiles into a honeycomb-shaped game grid, start the timer, and the rush is on. Form words letter-by-letter along a continuous path, but work fast and get creative because only words no other player has earn points. To up the challenge, Maker Wiggles 3D (creator of Randomonium) added a few twists. The same tile can be used twice in a sequence. And blank tiles are a wild card, representing any letter a player needs. With three sixty-second rounds per game, the stakes rise in each. Bonus brackets are placed on certain letters. Any word using a bracketed letter earns double points. This entertaining, educational new take on linguistic competition is, in a word, fun.

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Don
    Don

    Lexigo RUSH is a straightforward, but challenging game. Each player has just 60 seconds to find as many words as possible using the tiles in the grid. Be creative, and we hope you'll have fun. Happy to answer questions today.

  • susan
    susan
    1/13/2015 12:28 PM

    How is this different than Boggle?

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    1/13/2015 12:51 PM

    Hi Susan, one of the major differences is in Lexigo RUSH you can use the same tile more than once in the same word which is not allowed in Boggle. Another difference is the presence of a blank tile. And lastly, bonus brackets in the second and third rounds kick are new as well. Each adds a new, creative wrinkle.

  • Don
    Don – Special Guest
    1/13/2015 12:53 PM

    @susan Thank you for your question. There is one common element with Boggle and several differences. What is similar is that you make a list of words you see in the grid. What is different is important as the following features add variety and fun to the game play:

    1) You can reuse letters in a single word. So for example in spelling 'rebel' you could jump on and off of the 'e' to use it a second time

    2) There are blank tiles that add much more variety to words that may be spelled

    3) Each round sees an escalation in point value as you add the bonus rings in round 2 and 3. In this instance any word using the bonus ring has a double word value

    4) We've developed a great app - Wiggles 3D Game Box - that handles scoring, timing and has a custom dictionary! Our dictionary includes many proper nouns including people first names, places and many brand names.

    Have fun!

  • William
    William
    1/13/2015 12:49 PM

    Isn't it difficult for the player who is seated where they have to read the letters up-side-down?

  • Don
    Don – Special Guest
    1/13/2015 12:56 PM

    @William Hi William, If Lexigo RUSH is being played with 2 or 3 players there is no problem. With 4 players we suggest that each round the grid is assembled facing a different player. We have the grid being assembled by a different player each round to keep everyone involved. For rounds 2 and 3 when bonus rings are added, it keeps it fair if a different player does the random array of letters and placement of the bonus ring or rings.

  • Elisa
    Elisa
    1/13/2015 1:00 PM

    How many tiles are provided? How are the letters distributed? (Has some thought gone into letter distribution so that if you draw a random set of 13 letters, you don't have, say, an excess of consonants, or Qs without Us?)

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    1/13/2015 1:59 PM

    Hi Elisa, 46 tiles are provided with 13 distributed for each turn. Don can correct me if I'm wrong, but the player assembling the hexagon pattern can look at the letters as they put them in place so there won't be an abundance of consonants or issues like that.

  • Don
    Don – Special Guest
    1/13/2015 2:29 PM

    @Mike Hi Elisa, we find that a random draw of letters always provides an interesting grid to work with. Part of the fun is the random nature of the draw. We generally don't find it necessary to 'manage the the tile selection' in any way. We do not have a Q in the assortment so that avoids that problem. I would mention that the grid is replaced after each round so 39 letters are used each game. The addition of the blank tiles also helps ensure that there are always vowels or consonants in abundance.

  • Patrick
    Patrick
    1/13/2015 5:02 PM

    Have you considered coming up with a math version?

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    1/13/2015 5:23 PM

    Interesting idea, Patrick. Did you have a thought for how it could be adapted?

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

Lexigo RUSH

Twisty Word Game

Vocabulary + Strategy

Thirteen lettered tiles. Sixty seconds. Go! Find as many words as you can in Lexigo RUSH, a head-to-head game of stringing letters together.

Arrange the tiles into a honeycomb-shaped game grid, start the timer, and the rush is on. Form words letter-by-letter along a continuous path, but work fast and get creative because only words no other player has earn points.

To up the challenge, Maker Wiggles 3D (creator of Randomonium) added a few twists. The same tile can be used twice in a sequence. And blank tiles are a
wild card, representing any letter a player needs.

With three sixty-second rounds per game, the stakes rise in each. Bonus brackets are placed on certain letters. Any word using a bracketed letter earns double points. This entertaining, educational new take on linguistic competition is, in a word, fun.
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Lexigo Rush - Twisty Word Game

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Don
    Don

    Lexigo RUSH is a straightforward, but challenging game. Each player has just 60 seconds to find as many words as possible using the tiles in the grid. Be creative, and we hope you'll have fun. Happy to answer questions today.

  • susan
    susan
    1/13/2015 12:28 PM

    How is this different than Boggle?

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    1/13/2015 12:51 PM

    Hi Susan, one of the major differences is in Lexigo RUSH you can use the same tile more than once in the same word which is not allowed in Boggle. Another difference is the presence of a blank tile. And lastly, bonus brackets in the second and third rounds kick are new as well. Each adds a new, creative wrinkle.

  • Don
    Don – Special Guest
    1/13/2015 12:53 PM

    @susan Thank you for your question. There is one common element with Boggle and several differences. What is similar is that you make a list of words you see in the grid. What is different is important as the following features add variety and fun to the game play:

    1) You can reuse letters in a single word. So for example in spelling 'rebel' you could jump on and off of the 'e' to use it a second time

    2) There are blank tiles that add much more variety to words that may be spelled

    3) Each round sees an escalation in point value as you add the bonus rings in round 2 and 3. In this instance any word using the bonus ring has a double word value

    4) We've developed a great app - Wiggles 3D Game Box - that handles scoring, timing and has a custom dictionary! Our dictionary includes many proper nouns including people first names, places and many brand names.

    Have fun!

  • William
    William
    1/13/2015 12:49 PM

    Isn't it difficult for the player who is seated where they have to read the letters up-side-down?

  • Don
    Don – Special Guest
    1/13/2015 12:56 PM

    @William Hi William, If Lexigo RUSH is being played with 2 or 3 players there is no problem. With 4 players we suggest that each round the grid is assembled facing a different player. We have the grid being assembled by a different player each round to keep everyone involved. For rounds 2 and 3 when bonus rings are added, it keeps it fair if a different player does the random array of letters and placement of the bonus ring or rings.

  • Elisa
    Elisa
    1/13/2015 1:00 PM

    How many tiles are provided? How are the letters distributed? (Has some thought gone into letter distribution so that if you draw a random set of 13 letters, you don't have, say, an excess of consonants, or Qs without Us?)

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    1/13/2015 1:59 PM

    Hi Elisa, 46 tiles are provided with 13 distributed for each turn. Don can correct me if I'm wrong, but the player assembling the hexagon pattern can look at the letters as they put them in place so there won't be an abundance of consonants or issues like that.

  • Don
    Don – Special Guest
    1/13/2015 2:29 PM

    @Mike Hi Elisa, we find that a random draw of letters always provides an interesting grid to work with. Part of the fun is the random nature of the draw. We generally don't find it necessary to 'manage the the tile selection' in any way. We do not have a Q in the assortment so that avoids that problem. I would mention that the grid is replaced after each round so 39 letters are used each game. The addition of the blank tiles also helps ensure that there are always vowels or consonants in abundance.

  • Patrick
    Patrick
    1/13/2015 5:02 PM

    Have you considered coming up with a math version?

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    1/13/2015 5:23 PM

    Interesting idea, Patrick. Did you have a thought for how it could be adapted?

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.