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Earthling Crazy Crayons

A Rainbow of Recycling

LuAnn Foty invented Earthling Crazy Crayons by accident. She was melting down crayons for a craft project when it occurred to her that there were probably plenty of bits of crayons out there just being thrown away. She was right: 120,000 pounds of crayons are produced every day by the top crayon producer alone, and every year we seem to buy new boxes. Where do the old, broken crayons go? Well, if you send them to LuAnn, they can be reborn as awesome, 100%-post-consumer content crayons (see Details for how to donate your old crayons). Recycling is always good, of course, but because crayons are a petroleum-based product, you can feel especially good about maximizing the lifespan of an item that depends on oil.
Earthling Crazy Crayons
A Rainbow of Recycling

LuAnn Foty invented Earthling Crazy Crayons by accident. She was melting down crayons for a craft project when it occurred to her that there were probably plenty of bits of crayons out there just being thrown away. She was right: 120,000 pounds of crayons are produced every day by the top crayon producer alone, and every year we seem to buy new boxes. Where do the old, broken crayons go? Well, if you send them to LuAnn, they can be reborn as awesome, 100%-post-consumer content crayons (see Details for how to donate your old crayons). Recycling is always good, of course, but because crayons are a petroleum-based product, you can feel especially good about maximizing the lifespan of an item that depends on oil.

Our recycled crayon bundle includes a box of Eco Stars. With 20 stars in each box­, you’ll have 100 nice sharp points of color for your artistic masterpieces. Or use two points at once to create parallel lines. You also get a Can of Worms, which is (fittingly) nine earthworm-shaped crayons perfectly sized for little hands. As a special bonus, our bundle also includes one star-shaped crazy crayon with two colors swirled together.

LuAnn partners with a local work center in Wisconsin that employs people with developmental disabilities to sort the used crayons that arrive for recycling. She also works nationwide to educate kids on the importance of conservation. Art education, indeed.