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American MoJo

Maker - Cara Aley

American MoJo
Social Enterprises

Maker Story

American Clothes, American Jobs

"Feminization of poverty" is the term used to describe the fact that 2/3 of the people living below the poverty line in the United States are women with dependent children. Daycare can cost more than a minimum-wage salary, and once a woman is out of the workforce for six months or more, it's even harder to break back in. So what's the solution?

If you're Cara Aley and her brothers Tom and Darr, the solution is American MoJo, a "social venture in a for-profit vehicle." Let's break it down: MoJo provides free daycare and offers full benefits, pays above minimum wage, and empowers women to return to the workforce and support their families in sustainable ways. Better still, they then provide American-made goods to the public, which you can buy knowing that you're helping to break the cycle of poverty right here in the United States.

MoJo began in March of 2010 in Lowell, Mass., bringing industry to a largely abandoned mill area, and expansion to Chicago and Oakland, Calif., is already underway. Today you can choose from Italian wool coin purses, cozy stadium scarves with hand pockets, and Polartec vests and jackets. Every purchase potentially means more expansion, and more families back on their feet.

Products

Discovered 10/19/2011

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Unfortunately, products from this maker are no longer available on our site.

Products

Discovered 10/19/2011

Save on Pinterest
Share on Facebook

Unfortunately, products from this maker are no longer available on our site.

Social Enterprises

Maker Story

American Clothes, American Jobs

"Feminization of poverty" is the term used to describe the fact that 2/3 of the people living below the poverty line in the United States are women with dependent children. Daycare can cost more than a minimum-wage salary, and once a woman is out of the workforce for six months or more, it's even harder to break back in. So what's the solution?

If you're Cara Aley and her brothers Tom and Darr, the solution is American MoJo, a "social venture in a for-profit vehicle." Let's break it down: MoJo provides free daycare and offers full benefits, pays above minimum wage, and empowers women to return to the workforce and support their families in sustainable ways. Better still, they then provide American-made goods to the public, which you can buy knowing that you're helping to break the cycle of poverty right here in the United States.

MoJo began in March of 2010 in Lowell, Mass., bringing industry to a largely abandoned mill area, and expansion to Chicago and Oakland, Calif., is already underway. Today you can choose from Italian wool coin purses, cozy stadium scarves with hand pockets, and Polartec vests and jackets. Every purchase potentially means more expansion, and more families back on their feet.