Loyal Service

Patriot PAWS captured our hearts with an amazing mission that helps disabled veterans gain emotional and physical independence. The charity trains service dogs to do just about anything an injured vet might need—from pulling a wheelchair to picking up fallen objects to contacting help in an emergency. Besides providing companionship and tangible assistance to injured servicemen and women, Patriot PAWS’ pups are also changing the lives of inmates. Their Prison Program empowers inmates to train some of the dogs, teaching incarcerated individuals a new, meaningful vocation while letting them give back to the greater good. To date, Patriot PAWS has paired 130 dogs with veterans in over 33 states and they’re just getting started. Each dog is trained with his or her specific veteran in mind, which take lots lot of love and attention. The process takes over two years, but with the commitment of donors and volunteers, veterans are paired with a life-changing animal at no cost. We invite you to support the amazing work Patriot PAWS is doing. You’ll make a real difference for heroes who have sacrificed to serve us all.

Patriot PAWS

Training Service Dogs for Veterans

Loyal Service

Patriot PAWS captured our hearts with an amazing mission that helps disabled veterans gain emotional and physical independence. The charity trains service dogs to do just about anything an injured vet might need—from pulling a wheelchair to picking up fallen objects to contacting help in an emergency. Besides providing companionship and tangible assistance to injured servicemen and women, Patriot PAWS’ pups are also changing the lives of inmates. Their Prison Program empowers inmates to train some of the dogs, teaching incarcerated individuals a new, meaningful vocation while letting them give back to the greater good. To date, Patriot PAWS has paired 130 dogs with veterans in over 33 states and they’re just getting started. Each dog is trained with his or her specific veteran in mind, which take lots lot of love and attention. The process takes over two years, but with the commitment of donors and volunteers, veterans are paired with a life-changing animal at no cost. We invite you to support the amazing work Patriot PAWS is doing. You’ll make a real difference for heroes who have sacrificed to serve us all.
Philanthropy

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Lori
    Lori

    My name is Lori Stevens, and I am the Founder and Executive Director of Patriot PAWS Service Dogs. In 2005, I was working as a professional dog trainer when I was asked to help a group of disabled veterans train their dogs. After working with these veterans and visiting the VA Hospital in Dallas, I realized just how many of our disabled veterans are in desperate need of assistance dogs and I knew I had to help.

  • Emily
    Emily – Grommet Team
    11/2/2017 4:19 PM

    What does it take to train a pup?

  • Lori
    Lori – Special Guest
    11/2/2017 4:27 PM

    @Emily It takes 2 – 2 ½ years to fully train and certify a Patriot PAWS Service Dog and it costs approximately $34,000. The cost to train includes procurement; boarding, general care and veterinary care; training staff, time and travel; veteran/service dog team training; customization travel, training and adaptive equipment.

  • Emily
    Emily – Grommet Team
    11/2/2017 4:20 PM

    How did the Patriot Paws idea and mission start?

  • Lori
    Lori – Special Guest
    11/2/2017 4:27 PM

    @Emily My efforts began with four volunteers and quickly gained momentum and support. Patriot Paws was designated as a 501(c)(3) organization in February 2006. Since then, Patriot PAWS has grown to include a partnership program with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) which teaches prison inmates to train service dogs for disabled veterans. This program not only allows Patriot PAWS to reduce their training costs, but also provides the inmate trainers an opportunity to give back to society while incarcerated and gives them a new vocation when they are released.

  • Emily
    Emily – Grommet Team
    11/2/2017 4:20 PM

    You just had your graduation event. Tell us about it. What is it?

  • Lori
    Lori – Special Guest
    11/2/2017 4:28 PM

    @Emily On Monday, October 23, seven disabled American Veterans arrived at Patriot PAWS Service Dogs Training Center in Rockwall, TX and began the two-week process that would forever change their lives. Veterans that have been waiting for 3 to 4 years received the dogs that will become their lifelong companions and help mates.

    The seven newest recipients, five men and two women span the country with one from each coast (California and Michigan) and four from Texas. On Monday, they began the process of meeting all of the dogs that are up for graduation not knowing which dog will be going home with them. For the first four days, the veterans worked on a rotating basis with every dog as the Patriot PAWS staff observed the budding relationships developing between veterans and dogs. On Matching Day, Friday, October 27, the announcement was made as to which veteran gets which dog. Essentially, the dogs choose their veterans. Sometimes those bonds are obvious from Day 1 and for others, it may take a few days longer.

  • Emily
    Emily – Grommet Team
    11/2/2017 4:23 PM

    You train the service dogs for a specific veteran. Can you explain what that involves?

  • Lori
    Lori – Special Guest
    11/2/2017 4:29 PM

    @Emily Once a dog is placed with a veteran, we customize the training as much as possible during the training time before graduation. After the dog goes home with the veteran, we wait two weeks and then travel to the veteran’s home to further customize the training and make any necessary adaptations specific to the home environment.

  • Emily
    Emily – Grommet Team
    11/2/2017 4:23 PM

    How do the veterans respond when they finally meet their pups?

  • Lori
    Lori – Special Guest
    11/2/2017 4:29 PM

    @Emily It can be a very emotional time – there are feelings of joy, relief, hope, anxiety about the adjustment of owning a service dog. But mostly, I think, hope and happiness are the prevailing emotions.

  • Emily
    Emily – Grommet Team
    11/2/2017 4:24 PM

    What are the ways in which Patriot Paws hopes to grow and expand in the future?

  • Lori
    Lori – Special Guest
    11/2/2017 4:29 PM

    @Emily We hope to continue to expand our capacity to train service dogs as quickly and efficiently as possible.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

Patriot PAWS

Training Service Dogs for Veterans

Loyal Service

Patriot PAWS captured our hearts with an amazing mission that helps disabled veterans gain emotional and physical independence. The charity trains service dogs to do just about anything an injured vet might need—from pulling a wheelchair to picking up fallen objects to contacting help in an emergency.

Besides providing
companionship and tangible assistance to injured servicemen and women, Patriot PAWS’ pups are also changing the lives of inmates. Their Prison Program empowers inmates to train some of the dogs, teaching incarcerated individuals a new, meaningful vocation while letting them give back to the greater good.

To date, Patriot PAWS has paired 130 dogs with veterans in over 33 states and they’re just getting started.

Each dog is trained with his or her specific veteran in mind, which take lots lot of love and attention. The process takes over two years, but with the commitment of donors and volunteers, veterans are paired with a life-changing animal at no cost.

We invite you to support the amazing work Patriot PAWS is doing. You’ll make a real difference for heroes who have sacrificed to serve us all.
Read More Read Less
Patriot Paws v3

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Lori
    Lori

    My name is Lori Stevens, and I am the Founder and Executive Director of Patriot PAWS Service Dogs. In 2005, I was working as a professional dog trainer when I was asked to help a group of disabled veterans train their dogs. After working with these veterans and visiting the VA Hospital in Dallas, I realized just how many of our disabled veterans are in desperate need of assistance dogs and I knew I had to help.

  • Emily
    Emily – Grommet Team
    11/2/2017 4:19 PM

    What does it take to train a pup?

  • Lori
    Lori – Special Guest
    11/2/2017 4:27 PM

    @Emily It takes 2 – 2 ½ years to fully train and certify a Patriot PAWS Service Dog and it costs approximately $34,000. The cost to train includes procurement; boarding, general care and veterinary care; training staff, time and travel; veteran/service dog team training; customization travel, training and adaptive equipment.

  • Emily
    Emily – Grommet Team
    11/2/2017 4:20 PM

    How did the Patriot Paws idea and mission start?

  • Lori
    Lori – Special Guest
    11/2/2017 4:27 PM

    @Emily My efforts began with four volunteers and quickly gained momentum and support. Patriot Paws was designated as a 501(c)(3) organization in February 2006. Since then, Patriot PAWS has grown to include a partnership program with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) which teaches prison inmates to train service dogs for disabled veterans. This program not only allows Patriot PAWS to reduce their training costs, but also provides the inmate trainers an opportunity to give back to society while incarcerated and gives them a new vocation when they are released.

  • Emily
    Emily – Grommet Team
    11/2/2017 4:20 PM

    You just had your graduation event. Tell us about it. What is it?

  • Lori
    Lori – Special Guest
    11/2/2017 4:28 PM

    @Emily On Monday, October 23, seven disabled American Veterans arrived at Patriot PAWS Service Dogs Training Center in Rockwall, TX and began the two-week process that would forever change their lives. Veterans that have been waiting for 3 to 4 years received the dogs that will become their lifelong companions and help mates.

    The seven newest recipients, five men and two women span the country with one from each coast (California and Michigan) and four from Texas. On Monday, they began the process of meeting all of the dogs that are up for graduation not knowing which dog will be going home with them. For the first four days, the veterans worked on a rotating basis with every dog as the Patriot PAWS staff observed the budding relationships developing between veterans and dogs. On Matching Day, Friday, October 27, the announcement was made as to which veteran gets which dog. Essentially, the dogs choose their veterans. Sometimes those bonds are obvious from Day 1 and for others, it may take a few days longer.

  • Emily
    Emily – Grommet Team
    11/2/2017 4:23 PM

    You train the service dogs for a specific veteran. Can you explain what that involves?

  • Lori
    Lori – Special Guest
    11/2/2017 4:29 PM

    @Emily Once a dog is placed with a veteran, we customize the training as much as possible during the training time before graduation. After the dog goes home with the veteran, we wait two weeks and then travel to the veteran’s home to further customize the training and make any necessary adaptations specific to the home environment.

  • Emily
    Emily – Grommet Team
    11/2/2017 4:23 PM

    How do the veterans respond when they finally meet their pups?

  • Lori
    Lori – Special Guest
    11/2/2017 4:29 PM

    @Emily It can be a very emotional time – there are feelings of joy, relief, hope, anxiety about the adjustment of owning a service dog. But mostly, I think, hope and happiness are the prevailing emotions.

  • Emily
    Emily – Grommet Team
    11/2/2017 4:24 PM

    What are the ways in which Patriot Paws hopes to grow and expand in the future?

  • Lori
    Lori – Special Guest
    11/2/2017 4:29 PM

    @Emily We hope to continue to expand our capacity to train service dogs as quickly and efficiently as possible.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.