In your hands

Just as beauty is in the eye of the beholder, perfectly brewed espresso is a matter of taste. From a British company called Rok comes a non-electric espresso maker that puts the power completely in your hands so you can make each cup just the way you like it. While steam-powered espresso makers have been around since the turn of the 20th century, the Rok Espresso Maker is a hand-pumped machine. Not a single volt of electricity necessary (no pricey coffee pods either). The sleek engine grade metal and elegant shape make a statement on the countertop and bring new joy to a cherished part of any coffee connoisseur's day. For best results, be sure to use finely ground espresso beans and boiling hot water. By changing the amount of pressure you apply to the handles, you can control the strength of the espresso you make. The slower and steadier you press, the stronger the taste. The Rok Espresso Maker comes with a 10 year guarantee and is packaged in a reusable tin that includes a measuring spoon, detachable double spout, and a stainless steel milk frother. Why go to the coffee shop when the art of making espresso is right within your reach.

Rok

Espresso Maker

In your hands

Just as beauty is in the eye of the beholder, perfectly brewed espresso is a matter of taste. From a British company called Rok comes a non-electric espresso maker that puts the power completely in your hands so you can make each cup just the way you like it. While steam-powered espresso makers have been around since the turn of the 20th century, the Rok Espresso Maker is a hand-pumped machine. Not a single volt of electricity necessary (no pricey coffee pods either). The sleek engine grade metal and elegant shape make a statement on the countertop and bring new joy to a cherished part of any coffee connoisseur's day. For best results, be sure to use finely ground espresso beans and boiling hot water. By changing the amount of pressure you apply to the handles, you can control the strength of the espresso you make. The slower and steadier you press, the stronger the taste. The Rok Espresso Maker comes with a 10 year guarantee and is packaged in a reusable tin that includes a measuring spoon, detachable double spout, and a stainless steel milk frother. Why go to the coffee shop when the art of making espresso is right within your reach.

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Patrick
    Patrick

    Hi my name is Patrick, designer of the ROK Espresso Maker.

    I love coffee. I love design. And I love engineering that uses the power of our hands to save energy. So I wanted to create the best manual coffee maker, with the freedom to choose any coffee. No matter if it’s a quick morning coffee you want or a perfectly fine-tuned espresso shot – the ROK makes the experience richer. Life is busy nowadays and we love good quality coffee on weekdays and weekends. With the ROK you can prepare excellent coffee in just seconds, but you don’t need to spend thousands for a machine. I hope the ROK brings joy to your coffee routine.

  • Sylvia
    Sylvia
    10/8/2013 12:53 PM

    Unfortunately you have lost all of us who have "aging" hands with arthritis. It is a good looking piece of equipment but frankly I will spend my $200 on an expresso maker where I can push a button.

    Sorry!

  • Julia
    Julia – Grommet Team
    10/8/2013 1:09 PM

    @Sylvia Yes, this is more like driving a stick shift automobile. It is great for people that like the control and the morning calisthenics to get their ideal cup of espresso. Thank goodness there are also wonderful machines that start with a push of the button. We appreciate hearing your point of view.

  • Jon
    Jon
    10/8/2013 10:34 PM

    I'm not exactly sure if this really can make quality Espresso. If I'm not mistaken, a real espresso maker uses steam and not just boiled water... My stove top espresso maker can do the same thing at a much higher pressure and heat, it does not use electricity, just the same amount of energy you used to boil the water for this press. Not to mention I'm not very fond of having to manually press my espresso early in the morning while I have other things I need to do.

  • Jon
    Jon
    10/8/2013 10:36 PM

    Not to mention a stove top espresso maker costs $30.00 at most... Not $200.00.

  • Matthew
    Matthew
    10/9/2013 7:57 AM

    @Jon There are several types of machines that claim to be espresso makers. Electric steam driven and stove top "espresso"makers are considered by most to be inferior to pump driven espresso machines. An espresso purist type person would tell you that the only way to make "real" espresso is with a pump driven machine. I'm not affiliated with Rok, but the product looks to do a good job at mimicking the hand pump driven nature of an original manual espresso machine. That design choice will result in a higher quality cup of espresso than anything a moka pot can produce. The cost and effort for a better cup of espresso may not be worth it for you, but I'm sure it is for some people.

  • Amy
    Amy – Grommet Team
    10/9/2013 9:36 AM

    Hi Jon,

    Thanks for your feedback here. It's important that we address any concerns you might have here and to be certain we give you the right amount of clarity, I've contacted the founder and we'll be in touch shortly.

  • Tracy
    Tracy
    10/9/2013 10:15 AM

    @Matthew "The act of producing a shot of espresso is often termed "pulling" a shot, originating from lever espresso machines, which require pulling down a handle attached to a spring-loaded piston, forcing hot water through the coffee at high pressure.

    Today, however, it is more common for the pressure to be generated by an electric pump.

    Any steam is used to froth the milk - not to make espressos.

    Stovetop makers can create 'espresso style' coffee. However, the maximum pressure for coffee extraction that can be achieved with a stovetop pot at under 2 bar is not sufficient to extract the coffee oils to make a true espresso. According to the Italian Espresso National Institute an espresso must be made using an extraction pressure of 9 bar.

    The ROK uses the power of your hands to create a more involving experience to generate up to 10 bar. It gives so much more control and is as much an art as it is a science.

  • Matthew
    Matthew
    10/9/2013 10:21 AM

    @Tracy You're absolutely correct. Many people think that any strong coffee (e.g. moka pot or an aeropress' concentrated result) is the same as espresso, but anyone that has had a double shot pulled by a skilled person from a quality machine knows the vast difference.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

Rok

Espresso Maker

In your hands

Just as beauty is in the eye of the beholder, perfectly brewed espresso is a matter of taste. From a British company called Rok comes a non-electric espresso maker that puts the power completely in your hands so you can make each cup just the way you like it.

While steam-powered espresso makers have been around since the turn of the 20th century, the Rok Espresso Maker is a hand-pumped machine. Not a single volt of electricity necessary (no pricey coffee pods either). The sleek engine grade metal and elegant shape
make a statement on the countertop and bring new joy to a cherished part of any coffee connoisseur's day.

For best results, be sure to use finely ground espresso beans and boiling hot water. By changing the amount of pressure you apply to the handles, you can control the strength of the espresso you make. The slower and steadier you press, the stronger the taste.

The Rok Espresso Maker comes with a 10 year guarantee and is packaged in a reusable tin that includes a measuring spoon, detachable double spout, and a stainless steel milk frother.

Why go to the coffee shop when the art of making espresso is right within your reach.
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ROK - Espresso Maker

Shop Rok Products

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Patrick
    Patrick

    Hi my name is Patrick, designer of the ROK Espresso Maker.

    I love coffee. I love design. And I love engineering that uses the power of our hands to save energy. So I wanted to create the best manual coffee maker, with the freedom to choose any coffee. No matter if it’s a quick morning coffee you want or a perfectly fine-tuned espresso shot – the ROK makes the experience richer. Life is busy nowadays and we love good quality coffee on weekdays and weekends. With the ROK you can prepare excellent coffee in just seconds, but you don’t need to spend thousands for a machine. I hope the ROK brings joy to your coffee routine.

  • Sylvia
    Sylvia
    10/8/2013 12:53 PM

    Unfortunately you have lost all of us who have "aging" hands with arthritis. It is a good looking piece of equipment but frankly I will spend my $200 on an expresso maker where I can push a button.

    Sorry!

  • Julia
    Julia – Grommet Team
    10/8/2013 1:09 PM

    @Sylvia Yes, this is more like driving a stick shift automobile. It is great for people that like the control and the morning calisthenics to get their ideal cup of espresso. Thank goodness there are also wonderful machines that start with a push of the button. We appreciate hearing your point of view.

  • Jon
    Jon
    10/8/2013 10:34 PM

    I'm not exactly sure if this really can make quality Espresso. If I'm not mistaken, a real espresso maker uses steam and not just boiled water... My stove top espresso maker can do the same thing at a much higher pressure and heat, it does not use electricity, just the same amount of energy you used to boil the water for this press. Not to mention I'm not very fond of having to manually press my espresso early in the morning while I have other things I need to do.

  • Jon
    Jon
    10/8/2013 10:36 PM

    Not to mention a stove top espresso maker costs $30.00 at most... Not $200.00.

  • Matthew
    Matthew
    10/9/2013 7:57 AM

    @Jon There are several types of machines that claim to be espresso makers. Electric steam driven and stove top "espresso"makers are considered by most to be inferior to pump driven espresso machines. An espresso purist type person would tell you that the only way to make "real" espresso is with a pump driven machine. I'm not affiliated with Rok, but the product looks to do a good job at mimicking the hand pump driven nature of an original manual espresso machine. That design choice will result in a higher quality cup of espresso than anything a moka pot can produce. The cost and effort for a better cup of espresso may not be worth it for you, but I'm sure it is for some people.

  • Amy
    Amy – Grommet Team
    10/9/2013 9:36 AM

    Hi Jon,

    Thanks for your feedback here. It's important that we address any concerns you might have here and to be certain we give you the right amount of clarity, I've contacted the founder and we'll be in touch shortly.

  • Tracy
    Tracy
    10/9/2013 10:15 AM

    @Matthew "The act of producing a shot of espresso is often termed "pulling" a shot, originating from lever espresso machines, which require pulling down a handle attached to a spring-loaded piston, forcing hot water through the coffee at high pressure.

    Today, however, it is more common for the pressure to be generated by an electric pump.

    Any steam is used to froth the milk - not to make espressos.

    Stovetop makers can create 'espresso style' coffee. However, the maximum pressure for coffee extraction that can be achieved with a stovetop pot at under 2 bar is not sufficient to extract the coffee oils to make a true espresso. According to the Italian Espresso National Institute an espresso must be made using an extraction pressure of 9 bar.

    The ROK uses the power of your hands to create a more involving experience to generate up to 10 bar. It gives so much more control and is as much an art as it is a science.

  • Matthew
    Matthew
    10/9/2013 10:21 AM

    @Tracy You're absolutely correct. Many people think that any strong coffee (e.g. moka pot or an aeropress' concentrated result) is the same as espresso, but anyone that has had a double shot pulled by a skilled person from a quality machine knows the vast difference.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.