A Mask for Every Mission

Have you ever experienced something so great you wished you could bottle it? Jared Salzman did -- and then he followed through on his wish and really DID bottle it. During a trip to the Dead Sea in Israel, Jared found the mud there did wonders for his acne-prone skin. So he created a cleansing mask that’s made with pure, mineral-rich mud sifted from the shores of the Dead Sea. Sulfur, zinc, and magnesium are the active ingredients in his signature Dead Sea Mud Mask, which is targeted at oily or acne-prone skin. Jared followed up his do-it-yourself mud treatment with three more skin-pampering facial masks. The restorative Vitamin C Ester Mask is designed to improve your skin's tone and texture by promoting collagen production, while the exfoliating Pumpkin Glycolic Mask contains glycolic acid and pumpkin enzymes that go to work sloughing off old skin. If it’s firm skin you’re after, the DMAE Mask detoxifies with French pink clay and improves the elasticity of your skin. Every day our faces are exposed to dirt, dust and pollutants in the air. When you can’t make it to your aesthetician, an at-home mask can give you a deep clean and help you achieve that elusive healthy glow. Whether your goal is to clear up blemishes, exfoliate, or tighten and tone, the Holy Mud Company has a mask for your mission. We’re converted.

The Holy Mud Company -

Premium Facial Masks

A Mask for Every Mission

Have you ever experienced something so great you wished you could bottle it? Jared Salzman did -- and then he followed through on his wish and really DID bottle it. During a trip to the Dead Sea in Israel, Jared found the mud there did wonders for his acne-prone skin. So he created a cleansing mask that’s made with pure, mineral-rich mud sifted from the shores of the Dead Sea. Sulfur, zinc, and magnesium are the active ingredients in his signature Dead Sea Mud Mask, which is targeted at oily or acne-prone skin. Jared followed up his do-it-yourself mud treatment with three more skin-pampering facial masks. The restorative Vitamin C Ester Mask is designed to improve your skin's tone and texture by promoting collagen production, while the exfoliating Pumpkin Glycolic Mask contains glycolic acid and pumpkin enzymes that go to work sloughing off old skin. If it’s firm skin you’re after, the DMAE Mask detoxifies with French pink clay and improves the elasticity of your skin. Every day our faces are exposed to dirt, dust and pollutants in the air. When you can’t make it to your aesthetician, an at-home mask can give you a deep clean and help you achieve that elusive healthy glow. Whether your goal is to clear up blemishes, exfoliate, or tighten and tone, the Holy Mud Company has a mask for your mission. We’re converted.

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Jared
    Jared

    We often forget about giving our skin a regular blast of TLC and that is exactly what a mask provides. Hello everyone! I'm Jared Salzman, owner of The Holy Mud Company and I'm here to answer any questions you have about our masks.

  • Margaret
    Margaret
    9/6/2011 12:57 PM

    Hi, Jared. Would the deep cleansing mask be appropriate for a woman in her 50s one who had a history of acne and still breaks out occasionally? How about the exfoliating mask?

  • Jared
    Jared – Special Guest
    9/6/2011 1:38 PM

    Dear Margaret,

    Provided you do not have excessively dry or flaky skin, the Dead Sea Mud Mask would be appropriate and is also quite effective as a spot treatment. As for the Exfoliating Pumpkin Glycolic Mask, which happens to be our best-selling mask, it contains 5% Glycolic Acid so please do not use it if you have sensitive skin. And even if you don't have sensitive skin, with this mask it is best to test on a small area of your skin before using on your entire face.

    Regards,

    Jared

  • Kim
    Kim
    9/6/2011 11:42 PM

    Hi, Jared--

    Your masks look great, and I'm eager to try a couple of them, but I do have one question: What, if any, preservatives are in the masks? I ask because I prefer to avoid chemical preservatives, particularly the parabens.

    Thanks for your time; I look forward to your response.

    Regards,

    Kim

  • Jared
    Jared – Special Guest
    9/7/2011 9:14 AM

    Dear Kim, With respect to the 4 masks featured on the Daily Grommet, 2 use a paraben-based preservative system and 2 are paraben free. The DMAE Mask and the Vitamin C Ester Mask contain parabens. The Dead Sea Mud Mask and the Pumpkin Glycolic Mask do not contain parabens. Regards, Jared

  • Natasha
    Natasha
    9/7/2011 9:15 PM

    Hi, Jared--

    I would love to try your facial masks, but have a question as well: is it ok to use more than 1 mask ( not at the same time, of course!) but for the different skin issues addressed for each specific product? Or, is it best to stick with one until you're done and move on to another?

  • Jared
    Jared – Special Guest
    9/8/2011 10:22 AM

    Dear Natasha, You can absolutely use more than one mask. Regards, Jared

  • Christin
    Christin
    9/13/2011 1:04 PM

    I know it's a little late to ask questions on this one -- I'm catching up on my recent grommets. :) Do you know if the size of these mask containers would be large enough to use on my legs? Because I use an epilator for hair removal, I get some ingrowns and scars/discolorations, and the descriptions of these products make me think one or two of them might be good to work on those problems as well. Thanks!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/13/2011 1:11 PM

    @Christin: Actually, it's never too late to ask a question! I will find out and let you know.

  • Jared
    Jared – Special Guest
    9/13/2011 2:14 PM

    @Christin: I don't think the size of the jars would be adequate for someone to use on their legs unless they were doing spot treatments.

  • Colleen Rush
    Colleen Rush
    9/23/2011 12:06 PM

    Loving the masks! I got three different ones, and they are all doing great things for my skin.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/23/2011 12:44 PM

    @Colleen Rush: Wonderful - that must be a great feeling. Thank you for stopping back to share.

  • Holly Turner
    Holly Turner
    11/5/2011 11:04 PM

    The Holy Mud Company gets its materials from 'the Dead Sea'. If the point of the Grommet is to live one's values, it is essential to know from where, precisely, and by what rights Mr. Salzman, a Floridian I believe, obtains these materials. The Dead Sea is bordered by both the West Bank and by Israel. Many people have made illegitimate fortunes from Dead Sea assets belonging to Palestinians; customers need to know whether this is such a case. I would appreciate knowing this important information.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/6/2011 9:07 AM

    @Holly Turner: It absolutely is our intent that you ask the tough questions so that you understand where your purchase dollars go and therefore what you are supporting. I have forwarded your question on to Jared.

  • Jared
    Jared – Special Guest
    11/6/2011 2:36 PM

    @Holly Turner: Thank you for your interest in The Holy Mud Company. We obtain our Dead Sea Mud from the southern portion of the Dead Sea due to the fact that the mud from that part of the Dead Sea has a higher concentration of the mineral rich ingredients that make Dead Sea Mud so popular throughout the world. This area of the Dead Sea is not a part of the West Bank. Lastly, in addition to Israel and the West Bank, the Dead Sea is also bordered by Jordan. A place where we have also procured Dead Sea Mud. As far as the rights with which we obtain Dead Sea Mud under, I believe they are governed and outlined by trade agreements that the United States has entered into with both Israel and Jordan.

  • Holly Turner
    Holly Turner
    11/7/2011 12:52 AM

    @Jared Salzman and Katherine Klinger: thank you for responding so quickly. I appreciate the rare opportunity to ask these questions and receive a courteous response.

    I would very much appreciate if you could be more specific about the geographical source of your materials. I don't mean to suggest that you were in any sense knowingly untruthful in your response ... if you have different sensitivities than I, it may be less important to you. I am trying to put together your response with the facts that Ahava prefers the 'mineral rich' materials in the northern Dead Sea area, and the intense industrial exploitation of the southern area (e.g. that Dead Sea Works is extensively excavating the southern Dead Sea, spewing bromine far and wide ....) I'll not post the photos.

    I'm not in manufacturing, but I assume that you have a supplier(s) in the region providing the materials. Perhaps you could find out more specifically where? There must be a town or settlement nearby. (As for the Jordanian side - - I've spent time in Jordan and my sense is that they can very well look after themselves (smile) so I'm not inquiring about that side of sourcing.)

    Whenever I see Dead Sea products, and they are ubiquitous, I wonder about the acquisition - who owns and thereby sells minerals from a small body of water with more than one national border? Does a company such as yours pay (whether directly or through your supplier) the national government that controls the source portion of the Dead Sea, or the controller of the shore from which the acquisition occurred? Or does the bordering landowner from which the extraction is launched receive the money? International trade agreements would, I think, govern the import and export, I'm curious what happens locally, at the point of acquisition. I assume that an entreprenurial business such as would make dailygrommet is on a level to know such details.

    [As an aside from a naive citizen of the world - despite my advanced age, I'm surprised each time to learn that places we imagine as the very epitome of unspoiled nature, even those that are unique in the world and held sacred by many for their historical significance, are nonetheless exploited to the edge of destruction. Tourism, the means by which this business owner happened to come to the Dead Sea, may be all that can save it.)

    Again, thank you for you last prompt and courteous response. I hope you will be so helpful again.

  • Jared
    Jared – Special Guest
    11/7/2011 12:01 PM

    @Holly Turner: The Israeli supplier we use is based in Ein Bokek, which is located on the shores of the southern portion of the Dead Sea and home to many famous Dead Sea resorts. If you look at a map you'll see that Ein Bokek is not a part of the West Bank. I think I understand the point you are trying to make, however, since our Dead Sea Mud does not come from the West Bank I don't see how it applies to our company.

  • Julie
    Julie
    12/9/2011 2:11 PM

    I love facial mud masks!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    12/9/2011 2:25 PM

    @Julie: Then you must try these and let us know how they compare to others you've used. We think they are pretty great.

  • Stacie
    Stacie
    1/11/2012 1:29 PM

    Hi Jared,

    We have been trying to place an order but the phone number isn't working and we don't know how to contact you. Can you please let us know how to connect with you? Thanks! Stacie at Indian Springs

  • Tori
    Tori – Grommet Team
    1/11/2012 1:35 PM

    @Stacie: Hi Stacie, we'll be sure to pass your note along to Jared.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

The Holy Mud Company -

Premium Facial Masks

A Mask for Every Mission

Have you ever experienced something so great you wished you could bottle it? Jared Salzman did -- and then he followed through on his wish and really DID bottle it.

During a trip to the Dead Sea in Israel, Jared found the mud there did wonders for his acne-prone skin. So he created a cleansing mask that’s made with pure, mineral-rich mud sifted from the shores of the Dead Sea. Sulfur, zinc, and magnesium are the active ingredients in his signature Dead Sea Mud Mask, which is targeted at oily or acne-prone skin.


Jared followed up his do-it-yourself mud treatment with three more skin-pampering facial masks. The restorative Vitamin C Ester Mask is designed to improve your skin's tone and texture by promoting collagen production, while the exfoliating Pumpkin Glycolic Mask contains glycolic acid and pumpkin enzymes that go to work sloughing off old skin. If it’s firm skin you’re after, the DMAE Mask detoxifies with French pink clay and improves the elasticity of your skin.

Every day our faces are exposed to dirt, dust and pollutants in the air. When you can’t make it to your aesthetician, an at-home mask can give you a deep clean and help you achieve that elusive healthy glow. Whether your goal is to clear up blemishes, exfoliate, or tighten and tone, the Holy Mud Company has a mask for your mission. We’re converted.
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Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Jared
    Jared

    We often forget about giving our skin a regular blast of TLC and that is exactly what a mask provides. Hello everyone! I'm Jared Salzman, owner of The Holy Mud Company and I'm here to answer any questions you have about our masks.

  • Margaret
    Margaret
    9/6/2011 12:57 PM

    Hi, Jared. Would the deep cleansing mask be appropriate for a woman in her 50s one who had a history of acne and still breaks out occasionally? How about the exfoliating mask?

  • Jared
    Jared – Special Guest
    9/6/2011 1:38 PM

    Dear Margaret,

    Provided you do not have excessively dry or flaky skin, the Dead Sea Mud Mask would be appropriate and is also quite effective as a spot treatment. As for the Exfoliating Pumpkin Glycolic Mask, which happens to be our best-selling mask, it contains 5% Glycolic Acid so please do not use it if you have sensitive skin. And even if you don't have sensitive skin, with this mask it is best to test on a small area of your skin before using on your entire face.

    Regards,

    Jared

  • Kim
    Kim
    9/6/2011 11:42 PM

    Hi, Jared--

    Your masks look great, and I'm eager to try a couple of them, but I do have one question: What, if any, preservatives are in the masks? I ask because I prefer to avoid chemical preservatives, particularly the parabens.

    Thanks for your time; I look forward to your response.

    Regards,

    Kim

  • Jared
    Jared – Special Guest
    9/7/2011 9:14 AM

    Dear Kim, With respect to the 4 masks featured on the Daily Grommet, 2 use a paraben-based preservative system and 2 are paraben free. The DMAE Mask and the Vitamin C Ester Mask contain parabens. The Dead Sea Mud Mask and the Pumpkin Glycolic Mask do not contain parabens. Regards, Jared

  • Natasha
    Natasha
    9/7/2011 9:15 PM

    Hi, Jared--

    I would love to try your facial masks, but have a question as well: is it ok to use more than 1 mask ( not at the same time, of course!) but for the different skin issues addressed for each specific product? Or, is it best to stick with one until you're done and move on to another?

  • Jared
    Jared – Special Guest
    9/8/2011 10:22 AM

    Dear Natasha, You can absolutely use more than one mask. Regards, Jared

  • Christin
    Christin
    9/13/2011 1:04 PM

    I know it's a little late to ask questions on this one -- I'm catching up on my recent grommets. :) Do you know if the size of these mask containers would be large enough to use on my legs? Because I use an epilator for hair removal, I get some ingrowns and scars/discolorations, and the descriptions of these products make me think one or two of them might be good to work on those problems as well. Thanks!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/13/2011 1:11 PM

    @Christin: Actually, it's never too late to ask a question! I will find out and let you know.

  • Jared
    Jared – Special Guest
    9/13/2011 2:14 PM

    @Christin: I don't think the size of the jars would be adequate for someone to use on their legs unless they were doing spot treatments.

  • Colleen Rush
    Colleen Rush
    9/23/2011 12:06 PM

    Loving the masks! I got three different ones, and they are all doing great things for my skin.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    9/23/2011 12:44 PM

    @Colleen Rush: Wonderful - that must be a great feeling. Thank you for stopping back to share.

  • Holly Turner
    Holly Turner
    11/5/2011 11:04 PM

    The Holy Mud Company gets its materials from 'the Dead Sea'. If the point of the Grommet is to live one's values, it is essential to know from where, precisely, and by what rights Mr. Salzman, a Floridian I believe, obtains these materials. The Dead Sea is bordered by both the West Bank and by Israel. Many people have made illegitimate fortunes from Dead Sea assets belonging to Palestinians; customers need to know whether this is such a case. I would appreciate knowing this important information.

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    11/6/2011 9:07 AM

    @Holly Turner: It absolutely is our intent that you ask the tough questions so that you understand where your purchase dollars go and therefore what you are supporting. I have forwarded your question on to Jared.

  • Jared
    Jared – Special Guest
    11/6/2011 2:36 PM

    @Holly Turner: Thank you for your interest in The Holy Mud Company. We obtain our Dead Sea Mud from the southern portion of the Dead Sea due to the fact that the mud from that part of the Dead Sea has a higher concentration of the mineral rich ingredients that make Dead Sea Mud so popular throughout the world. This area of the Dead Sea is not a part of the West Bank. Lastly, in addition to Israel and the West Bank, the Dead Sea is also bordered by Jordan. A place where we have also procured Dead Sea Mud. As far as the rights with which we obtain Dead Sea Mud under, I believe they are governed and outlined by trade agreements that the United States has entered into with both Israel and Jordan.

  • Holly Turner
    Holly Turner
    11/7/2011 12:52 AM

    @Jared Salzman and Katherine Klinger: thank you for responding so quickly. I appreciate the rare opportunity to ask these questions and receive a courteous response.

    I would very much appreciate if you could be more specific about the geographical source of your materials. I don't mean to suggest that you were in any sense knowingly untruthful in your response ... if you have different sensitivities than I, it may be less important to you. I am trying to put together your response with the facts that Ahava prefers the 'mineral rich' materials in the northern Dead Sea area, and the intense industrial exploitation of the southern area (e.g. that Dead Sea Works is extensively excavating the southern Dead Sea, spewing bromine far and wide ....) I'll not post the photos.

    I'm not in manufacturing, but I assume that you have a supplier(s) in the region providing the materials. Perhaps you could find out more specifically where? There must be a town or settlement nearby. (As for the Jordanian side - - I've spent time in Jordan and my sense is that they can very well look after themselves (smile) so I'm not inquiring about that side of sourcing.)

    Whenever I see Dead Sea products, and they are ubiquitous, I wonder about the acquisition - who owns and thereby sells minerals from a small body of water with more than one national border? Does a company such as yours pay (whether directly or through your supplier) the national government that controls the source portion of the Dead Sea, or the controller of the shore from which the acquisition occurred? Or does the bordering landowner from which the extraction is launched receive the money? International trade agreements would, I think, govern the import and export, I'm curious what happens locally, at the point of acquisition. I assume that an entreprenurial business such as would make dailygrommet is on a level to know such details.

    [As an aside from a naive citizen of the world - despite my advanced age, I'm surprised each time to learn that places we imagine as the very epitome of unspoiled nature, even those that are unique in the world and held sacred by many for their historical significance, are nonetheless exploited to the edge of destruction. Tourism, the means by which this business owner happened to come to the Dead Sea, may be all that can save it.)

    Again, thank you for you last prompt and courteous response. I hope you will be so helpful again.

  • Jared
    Jared – Special Guest
    11/7/2011 12:01 PM

    @Holly Turner: The Israeli supplier we use is based in Ein Bokek, which is located on the shores of the southern portion of the Dead Sea and home to many famous Dead Sea resorts. If you look at a map you'll see that Ein Bokek is not a part of the West Bank. I think I understand the point you are trying to make, however, since our Dead Sea Mud does not come from the West Bank I don't see how it applies to our company.

  • Julie
    Julie
    12/9/2011 2:11 PM

    I love facial mud masks!

  • Katherine
    Katherine – Grommet Team
    12/9/2011 2:25 PM

    @Julie: Then you must try these and let us know how they compare to others you've used. We think they are pretty great.

  • Stacie
    Stacie
    1/11/2012 1:29 PM

    Hi Jared,

    We have been trying to place an order but the phone number isn't working and we don't know how to contact you. Can you please let us know how to connect with you? Thanks! Stacie at Indian Springs

  • Tori
    Tori – Grommet Team
    1/11/2012 1:35 PM

    @Stacie: Hi Stacie, we'll be sure to pass your note along to Jared.

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.