Ice Blocking

Ever wish you could go sledding in the middle of summer? Wish no more. The Slicer all-season sled lets you race down the slopes whether they’re covered in snow or not. Years ago, snow-deprived kids started freezing large blocks of ice to use as sleds on grassy hills. When Scott Ireland’s kids tried “ice blocking,” he realized what a cool idea it was and wanted to make it better. He created the Slicer—a sled that could be fitted with blocks of ice. Honeycomb-shaped Icer trays make lighter, stronger blocks of ice that last for up to two hours of “winter” fun. Freeze ‘em and snap ‘em to the bottom of your sled. After a few minutes they’ll be slippery, and you’ll be ready to roll. Already have snow? The Slicer works great by itself in wintery conditions, with a double-walled design that keeps you a little warmer and further away from the ground. When you’re not out racing, put the Icers inside Slicer for easy storage. Next time the urge to sled hits, no matter the season, you’ll be ready.

Slicer by Ice Meister

All-Season Sled

Ice Blocking

Ever wish you could go sledding in the middle of summer? Wish no more. The Slicer all-season sled lets you race down the slopes whether they’re covered in snow or not. Years ago, snow-deprived kids started freezing large blocks of ice to use as sleds on grassy hills. When Scott Ireland’s kids tried “ice blocking,” he realized what a cool idea it was and wanted to make it better. He created the Slicer—a sled that could be fitted with blocks of ice. Honeycomb-shaped Icer trays make lighter, stronger blocks of ice that last for up to two hours of “winter” fun. Freeze ‘em and snap ‘em to the bottom of your sled. After a few minutes they’ll be slippery, and you’ll be ready to roll. Already have snow? The Slicer works great by itself in wintery conditions, with a double-walled design that keeps you a little warmer and further away from the ground. When you’re not out racing, put the Icers inside Slicer for easy storage. Next time the urge to sled hits, no matter the season, you’ll be ready.
Independent Maker

Grommet Launch Conversation

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Scott
    Scott

    Hello everyone! I'm proud to introduce Ice Meister to The Grommet. I'd be happy to answer any questions you have!

  • Jessica
    Jessica
    12/3/2015 9:47 AM

    Hello Scott! I remember as a teenager doing this with the ice block on a golf course and then going back the next day and seeing the damage we'd done on the hill. How is it that these ice blocks do not ruin the grass?

  • Scott
    Scott – Special Guest
    12/3/2015 10:14 AM

    @Jessica Hi Jessca. Great question!

    With normal ice-blocking, the ice blocks tend to be very heavy and have a relatively small footprint (especially if you're using ones purchased at the grocery store). That puts a lot of concentrated pressure on the grass. With the Slicer sled, the Icers (or the ice blocks that are attached to the bottom of the sled) are much lighter and thinner (and there are two of them), and that spreads the riders weight out over a much greater area and greatly minimizes the concentrated downward pressure on the grass. Contrary to normal ice-blocking, we've found that sledding on grass with the Slicer sled results in absolutely no damage to the lawn!

    Hope that answers your question.

  • Sherri
    Sherri
    12/3/2015 10:19 AM

    Do you recommend for certain weight limit or age ----

  • Scott
    Scott – Special Guest
    12/3/2015 10:25 AM

    @Sherri Hi Sherri,

    The Slicer can be great fun for kids and adults of all ages, but it's recommended for those 3 and up. For younger children, a more gentle slope is recommended. It's officially rated to accommodate riders up to 200 pounds, but we've actually had heavier riders than that use it without damaging the sled.

  • Joyce
    Joyce
    12/3/2015 10:54 AM

    @Scott It's very cool, but the price point is a bit steep...

  • J
    J
    12/3/2015 11:06 AM

    @Joyce I was thinking it was a bargain!

  • Scott
    Scott – Special Guest
    12/3/2015 11:17 AM

    @Joyce Hi Joyce,

    Yes, the Slicer is quite a bit more expensive than many of the cheap plastic snow sleds that are used a time or two before they break and are discarded. However, I think if you compare it against some of the better, higher-end snow sleds -- the Slicer really is one of the very best snow sleds out there, as it's rugged and works great in all snow conditions -- and then consider the fact that it can be used year-round (not just when it snows), we think it's actually a very good value.

  • Faith
    Faith
    12/3/2015 11:25 AM

    @Faith

    Great Idea...I am wondering how sturdy the base of the sled is and will the ice blocks remain unbroken and in place after the sled hits or runs over a rock. I live next to Rocky Mt. Natl' Park with a great sled hill...formerly a ski slope. AND rocks in the ground, usually below ground and hidden by the winter snow, are above ground in the summer. I don't see any guiding apparatus? Thanks.

    Faith

  • Scott
    Scott – Special Guest
    12/3/2015 11:47 AM

    @Faith Hi Faith,

    The Slicer sled's low-profile runners do allow the rider to somewhat steer (by leaning to one side or the other) when using the sled on snow; but when using it on grass with the attached Icers (ice blocks), you really don't have any steering control whatsoever. That can certainly add to the excitement (especially for older kids); but if you have rocks sticking up in your path, that doesn't sound like a very safe place to go ice block sledding.

    The honeycomb grid (that is formed inside the ice of the attached ice blocks or Icers) is the secret to creating a thin, lightweight ice block that won't easily break apart during sledding. (It's kind of like putting rebar or a wire mesh inside concrete). That means you can sled over some some bumps without having the Icers (or ice blocks) fall apart -- and they could even survive going over a flat smooth rock as long as the rock wasn't sticking up; but strictly from a safety standpoint, I would try to find a smooth grassy hill to use the Slicer on during the summer (without any rocks in the way to worry about).

  • peggy
    peggy
    12/3/2015 12:11 PM

    How long does the ice last, ie, how long can you play?

  • Scott
    Scott – Special Guest
    12/3/2015 12:47 PM

    @peggy Great, question, Peggy!

    The time you can sled is dependent on several factors, so it varies somewhat. Factors such as the outdoor temperature and humidity greatly influence how fast the ice melts, and the amount of runs that are made also plays a role. It stands to reason that the hotter (and more humid) it is,and the more runs you make, the faster the ice will melt. Ironically, it's the melting ice that makes the sled go on grass; so the better or more it melts, the better the sled goes. (Think about taking an ice cube straight out of the freezer and how it is initially kind of sticky; but then after a few minutes of melting, it is so slippery you can't even pick it up!) Generally speaking, at room temperature and low humidity, under normal usage the Icers (or ice blocks) can last up to about an hour. In warmer temperatures, we recommend purchasing additional Icers in order to extend your sledding fun; and those can be obtained directly from us (the manufacturer).

  • Scott
    Scott – Special Guest
    12/3/2015 3:35 PM

    The Slicer Sled is a great snow sled that works well in almost all snow conditions; but that's not what makes it unique, By attaching the included Icers (or special ice blocks you form in your freezer) to the bottom of the Slicer Sled, you can use the Slicer to go sledding on grass! In the winter you put the sled on the snow; and in the summer you put the "snow" on the bottom of the sled!

    We're excited that The Grommet has chosen to feature the Slicer. Feel free to ask me any questions about this unique product!

  • Deborah
    Deborah
    12/3/2015 6:50 PM

    Hi Scott, Does it work on sand dunes?

  • Deborah
    Deborah
    12/3/2015 6:53 PM

    @Deborah Oops, didn't read that it was real ice. Maybe find some other material for sand

  • Scott
    Scott – Special Guest
    12/3/2015 7:15 PM

    @Deborah Hi Deborah,

    The Icers (ice blocks) are intended to be used only on grass. (The Slicer Sled does not use the Icers at all when sledding on snow.) Without the Icers, the Slicer would probably work on steep sand dunes, but flat bottomed sleds (without runners) would probably work a little better on that surface. If you were to use the Icers on sand dunes, you wouldn't go anywhere and would probably just end up with a muddy mess!

  • Suz
    Suz
    12/3/2015 8:41 PM

    Do you sell extra ice trays so one set can be used while the other is freezing?

  • zach
    zach
    12/3/2015 10:00 PM

    @Suz

    Hey, dont take it from me but look at his reply to Peggy. At the end he says "In warmer temperatures, we recommend purchasing additional Icers in order to extend your sledding fun; and those can be obtained directly from us (the manufacturer)."

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    12/4/2015 9:35 AM

    Thanks for the response, Zach!

    Suz, we'll let you know as soon as we have extra ice trays on site!

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.

 

Slicer by Ice Meister

All-Season Sled

Ice Blocking

Ever wish you could go sledding in the middle of summer? Wish no more. The Slicer all-season sled lets you race down the slopes whether they’re covered in snow or not.

Years ago, snow-deprived kids started freezing large blocks of ice to use as sleds on grassy hills. When Scott Ireland’s kids tried “ice blocking,” he realized
what a cool idea it was and wanted to make it better. He created the Slicer—a sled that could be fitted with blocks of ice.

Honeycomb-shaped Icer trays make lighter, stronger blocks of ice that last for up to two hours of “winter” fun. Freeze ‘em and snap ‘em to the bottom of your sled. After a few minutes they’ll be slippery, and you’ll be ready to roll.

Already have snow? The Slicer works great by itself in wintery conditions, with a double-walled design that keeps you a little warmer and further away from the ground.

When you’re not out racing, put the Icers inside Slicer for easy storage. Next time the urge to sled hits, no matter the season, you’ll be ready.
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Go sledding this winter. And spring. And summer.

Shop Slicer by Ice Meister Products

Grommet Launch Conversation

  • Scott
    Scott

    Hello everyone! I'm proud to introduce Ice Meister to The Grommet. I'd be happy to answer any questions you have!

  • Jessica
    Jessica
    12/3/2015 9:47 AM

    Hello Scott! I remember as a teenager doing this with the ice block on a golf course and then going back the next day and seeing the damage we'd done on the hill. How is it that these ice blocks do not ruin the grass?

  • Scott
    Scott – Special Guest
    12/3/2015 10:14 AM

    @Jessica Hi Jessca. Great question!

    With normal ice-blocking, the ice blocks tend to be very heavy and have a relatively small footprint (especially if you're using ones purchased at the grocery store). That puts a lot of concentrated pressure on the grass. With the Slicer sled, the Icers (or the ice blocks that are attached to the bottom of the sled) are much lighter and thinner (and there are two of them), and that spreads the riders weight out over a much greater area and greatly minimizes the concentrated downward pressure on the grass. Contrary to normal ice-blocking, we've found that sledding on grass with the Slicer sled results in absolutely no damage to the lawn!

    Hope that answers your question.

  • Sherri
    Sherri
    12/3/2015 10:19 AM

    Do you recommend for certain weight limit or age ----

  • Scott
    Scott – Special Guest
    12/3/2015 10:25 AM

    @Sherri Hi Sherri,

    The Slicer can be great fun for kids and adults of all ages, but it's recommended for those 3 and up. For younger children, a more gentle slope is recommended. It's officially rated to accommodate riders up to 200 pounds, but we've actually had heavier riders than that use it without damaging the sled.

  • Joyce
    Joyce
    12/3/2015 10:54 AM

    @Scott It's very cool, but the price point is a bit steep...

  • J
    J
    12/3/2015 11:06 AM

    @Joyce I was thinking it was a bargain!

  • Scott
    Scott – Special Guest
    12/3/2015 11:17 AM

    @Joyce Hi Joyce,

    Yes, the Slicer is quite a bit more expensive than many of the cheap plastic snow sleds that are used a time or two before they break and are discarded. However, I think if you compare it against some of the better, higher-end snow sleds -- the Slicer really is one of the very best snow sleds out there, as it's rugged and works great in all snow conditions -- and then consider the fact that it can be used year-round (not just when it snows), we think it's actually a very good value.

  • Faith
    Faith
    12/3/2015 11:25 AM

    @Faith

    Great Idea...I am wondering how sturdy the base of the sled is and will the ice blocks remain unbroken and in place after the sled hits or runs over a rock. I live next to Rocky Mt. Natl' Park with a great sled hill...formerly a ski slope. AND rocks in the ground, usually below ground and hidden by the winter snow, are above ground in the summer. I don't see any guiding apparatus? Thanks.

    Faith

  • Scott
    Scott – Special Guest
    12/3/2015 11:47 AM

    @Faith Hi Faith,

    The Slicer sled's low-profile runners do allow the rider to somewhat steer (by leaning to one side or the other) when using the sled on snow; but when using it on grass with the attached Icers (ice blocks), you really don't have any steering control whatsoever. That can certainly add to the excitement (especially for older kids); but if you have rocks sticking up in your path, that doesn't sound like a very safe place to go ice block sledding.

    The honeycomb grid (that is formed inside the ice of the attached ice blocks or Icers) is the secret to creating a thin, lightweight ice block that won't easily break apart during sledding. (It's kind of like putting rebar or a wire mesh inside concrete). That means you can sled over some some bumps without having the Icers (or ice blocks) fall apart -- and they could even survive going over a flat smooth rock as long as the rock wasn't sticking up; but strictly from a safety standpoint, I would try to find a smooth grassy hill to use the Slicer on during the summer (without any rocks in the way to worry about).

  • peggy
    peggy
    12/3/2015 12:11 PM

    How long does the ice last, ie, how long can you play?

  • Scott
    Scott – Special Guest
    12/3/2015 12:47 PM

    @peggy Great, question, Peggy!

    The time you can sled is dependent on several factors, so it varies somewhat. Factors such as the outdoor temperature and humidity greatly influence how fast the ice melts, and the amount of runs that are made also plays a role. It stands to reason that the hotter (and more humid) it is,and the more runs you make, the faster the ice will melt. Ironically, it's the melting ice that makes the sled go on grass; so the better or more it melts, the better the sled goes. (Think about taking an ice cube straight out of the freezer and how it is initially kind of sticky; but then after a few minutes of melting, it is so slippery you can't even pick it up!) Generally speaking, at room temperature and low humidity, under normal usage the Icers (or ice blocks) can last up to about an hour. In warmer temperatures, we recommend purchasing additional Icers in order to extend your sledding fun; and those can be obtained directly from us (the manufacturer).

  • Scott
    Scott – Special Guest
    12/3/2015 3:35 PM

    The Slicer Sled is a great snow sled that works well in almost all snow conditions; but that's not what makes it unique, By attaching the included Icers (or special ice blocks you form in your freezer) to the bottom of the Slicer Sled, you can use the Slicer to go sledding on grass! In the winter you put the sled on the snow; and in the summer you put the "snow" on the bottom of the sled!

    We're excited that The Grommet has chosen to feature the Slicer. Feel free to ask me any questions about this unique product!

  • Deborah
    Deborah
    12/3/2015 6:50 PM

    Hi Scott, Does it work on sand dunes?

  • Deborah
    Deborah
    12/3/2015 6:53 PM

    @Deborah Oops, didn't read that it was real ice. Maybe find some other material for sand

  • Scott
    Scott – Special Guest
    12/3/2015 7:15 PM

    @Deborah Hi Deborah,

    The Icers (ice blocks) are intended to be used only on grass. (The Slicer Sled does not use the Icers at all when sledding on snow.) Without the Icers, the Slicer would probably work on steep sand dunes, but flat bottomed sleds (without runners) would probably work a little better on that surface. If you were to use the Icers on sand dunes, you wouldn't go anywhere and would probably just end up with a muddy mess!

  • Suz
    Suz
    12/3/2015 8:41 PM

    Do you sell extra ice trays so one set can be used while the other is freezing?

  • zach
    zach
    12/3/2015 10:00 PM

    @Suz

    Hey, dont take it from me but look at his reply to Peggy. At the end he says "In warmer temperatures, we recommend purchasing additional Icers in order to extend your sledding fun; and those can be obtained directly from us (the manufacturer)."

  • Mike
    Mike – Grommet Team
    12/4/2015 9:35 AM

    Thanks for the response, Zach!

    Suz, we'll let you know as soon as we have extra ice trays on site!

The launch day conversation has ended. Please direct further questions about this Grommet to our Community Experience Team.